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Database Basics: Microsoft Access

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Microsoft Access is the world's most popular database management system (DBMS). It is designed to be flexible, easy-to-learn, web compatible, and compatible with other interfaces (meaning it can be used to create the relationship between data fields in a record and it can use any method to access the information)

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Database Basics: Microsoft Access

  1. 1. Database Basics Microsoft Access © Mr. Breitsprecher & BreitLinks. All Rights Reserved
  2. 2. Fall, 2002 Database  Organized collection of related information  Arranged for ease of use  Examples include address and phone books © Mr. Breitsprecher & BreitLinks. All Rights Reserved
  3. 3. Fall, 2002 Database Management System (DBMS)  Software that creates and manages a database  Microsoft’s DBMS is called Access © Mr. Breitsprecher & BreitLinks. All Rights Reserved
  4. 4. Fall, 2002 Database Files  Think of a database as an electronic file cabinet  Each cabinet (set of drawers) is a collection of data  This is a manual database © Mr. Breitsprecher & BreitLinks. All Rights Reserved
  5. 5. Fall, 2002 Database Records  Within each drawer is a set of folders  The folders contain data that is related  Each folder represents a record within the database © Mr. Breitsprecher & BreitLinks. All Rights Reserved
  6. 6. Fall, 2002 Database Fields  Within each folder are pieces of information  Each small piece of information represents a field Phone Number © Mr. Breitsprecher & BreitLinks. All Rights Reserved
  7. 7. Fall, 2002 Database Hierarchy  Field (smallest unit)  Record (collection of related fields)  File (collection of related records) Each line on this card represents a field Each card represents a record A collection of cards represents a database file © Mr. Breitsprecher & BreitLinks. All Rights Reserved
  8. 8. Fall, 2002 Working with Access Databases  Databases are collections of relationships between information  They are intangible  We can view Access data in different ways  Microsoft calls these tools objects © Mr. Breitsprecher & BreitLinks. All Rights Reserved
  9. 9. Fall, 2002 Common Access Objects  Tables  Forms  Queries  Reports © Mr. Breitsprecher & BreitLinks. All Rights Reserved
  10. 10. Fall, 2002 Access Tables  Columns (fields) and rows (records)  Looks like Excel spreadsheets  Differ because they maintain relationships © Mr. Breitsprecher & BreitLinks. All Rights Reserved
  11. 11. Fall, 2002 Access Forms  Records in Access can be organized as forms  Shows 1 record at a time  Used to enter, view, or edit data © Mr. Breitsprecher & BreitLinks. All Rights Reserved
  12. 12. Fall, 2002 Access Queries  Information can be easily pulled out of a database  Asking Access for information is called a query  Easily locates data © Mr. Breitsprecher & BreitLinks. All Rights Reserved
  13. 13. Fall, 2002 Access Reports  Summarize data  Print out selected information  Customize reports to organize data  Use only information you need © Mr. Breitsprecher & BreitLinks. All Rights Reserved
  14. 14. Fall, 2002 Databases Are All Around Us  Schools keep data on students  Government keeps data on earnings and taxes  Credit information is in databases  Grocery stores track purchases  Website collect user information (cookies)  Databases drive the information age and modern economy © Mr. Breitsprecher & BreitLinks. All Rights Reserved

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