Modernism and the Russians <ul><li>Chapter 32:  The Modernist Assault </li></ul>Copyright, 1996 © Dale Carnegie & Associat...
Challenge Questions: <ul><li>In what way does a government control art and artists?  Are any paintings in this slideshow c...
Background to Russian Modernism... <ul><li>Imperial Russia = Tzars wanted to be great “European” powers, expansionist and ...
Icon as Key Symbol and Influence in Russian Painting <ul><li>Icon = holy image typically painted on wood, emphasizes relig...
Russian Impressionists <ul><li>The following slides represent work by relatively unknown Russian artists who ultimately to...
Liubov Popova (1889-1924) <ul><li>Considered most famous female Russian Impressionist </li></ul><ul><li>“ Representation o...
Popova <ul><li>“ Sketch for Portrait” (1915) </li></ul>
Popova <ul><li>“ Painterly Architectonics” (1916) </li></ul>
Marc Chagall (1887-1985) <ul><li>Failed first art examination </li></ul><ul><li>Inspired by Jewish heritage, scriptures, R...
Self-portrait with seven fingers Chagall
Chagall Me and My Village
Filonov (1883-1941) <ul><li>1910, expelled Academy of Arts, Moscow </li></ul><ul><li>1913 travelled to Italy, France </li>...
Filonov The Collective Farmworker
Filanov The Holy Family
Filonov (1883-1941) <ul><li>“The artist-proletarian’s obligation is not only to create works that answer the demands of to...
Natal’ia Goncharova  (1881-1962) <ul><li>Began with sculpture, then painting </li></ul><ul><li>Favorite theme:  working Ru...
Natal’ia Goncharova  (1881-1962) <ul><li>“In the Artist’s Studio” (1907-1908) </li></ul><ul><li>“Green and Yellow Forest” ...
Goncharova In the artist’s studio, 1907-1908
Goncharova The Green and Yellow Forest, 1912 Next:   The Cyclist, 1912-1913
 
Kandinskii (1866-1944) <ul><li>Painter, printmaker, stage designer, decorative artist, theorist </li></ul><ul><li>Interest...
Kandinskii Blue Mountain,  1906-1911
Kandinskii Improvisation 6 (African), 1896-1911 Next:  Flood Improvisation,  1911-1914
 
Kandinskii (1866-1944) <ul><li>“Color is the power which directly influences the soul.  Color is the keyboard, the eyes ar...
Kandinskii (1866-1944) <ul><li>“Moscow” (1914-1921) </li></ul><ul><li>“Several Circles” (Bauhaus, 1922-1933) </li></ul><ul...
 
 
 
Malevich (1878-1935) <ul><li>Cubo-Futurism unique to Russia </li></ul><ul><li>Most Russian artists painted “Cubo-Futurism”...
Malevich (1878-1935) <ul><li>“Self Portrait” </li></ul><ul><li>“Taking in the Harvest” </li></ul><ul><li>“Girls in a Field...
 
 
 
Challenge Questions: <ul><li>In what way does a government control art and artists?  Are any paintings in this slideshow c...
Sources of Slides... <ul><li>Portland Art Museum exhibit: “Painting Revolution:  Kandinsky, Malevich and the Russian Avant...
Upcoming SlideShare
Loading in …5
×

Pp Russians

659 views

Published on

0 Comments
0 Likes
Statistics
Notes
  • Be the first to comment

  • Be the first to like this

No Downloads
Views
Total views
659
On SlideShare
0
From Embeds
0
Number of Embeds
3
Actions
Shares
0
Downloads
7
Comments
0
Likes
0
Embeds 0
No embeds

No notes for slide
  • Source: http://www.rollins.ed/Foreign_Lang/Russian/kandin.html
  • Source: http://www.rollins.ed/Foreign_Lang/Russian/kandin.html
  • Pp Russians

    1. 1. Modernism and the Russians <ul><li>Chapter 32: The Modernist Assault </li></ul>Copyright, 1996 © Dale Carnegie & Associates, Inc. Humanities 103 Spring 2005 Instructor Beth Camp
    2. 2. Challenge Questions: <ul><li>In what way does a government control art and artists? Are any paintings in this slideshow considered propaganda? </li></ul><ul><li>Which paintings do you think could be considered Impressionist? Post-Impressionist? Modern? Cubist? Futurist? Fauvist? Why? </li></ul>
    3. 3. Background to Russian Modernism... <ul><li>Imperial Russia = Tzars wanted to be great “European” powers, expansionist and despotic. </li></ul><ul><li>Tzar Alexander II emancipated serfs in 1861 but he was assassinated in 1881. Harsher governments resulted. </li></ul><ul><li>1904 Russia defeated by Japan, peasants hungry, students protesting, workers striking – These factors led to end of the Tzar’s rule and the Russian Revolution, 1917 </li></ul>
    4. 4. Icon as Key Symbol and Influence in Russian Painting <ul><li>Icon = holy image typically painted on wood, emphasizes religious and spiritual values and beliefs </li></ul><ul><li>Not representational art, but simple, flat figures; symbolic colors, no natural source of light, can show simultaneous time </li></ul><ul><li>Religious ideas more important than reality </li></ul><ul><li>Psychological perspective </li></ul>
    5. 5. Russian Impressionists <ul><li>The following slides represent work by relatively unknown Russian artists who ultimately took great risks to paint in a more modern style. </li></ul>
    6. 6. Liubov Popova (1889-1924) <ul><li>Considered most famous female Russian Impressionist </li></ul><ul><li>“ Representation of reality – without artistic deformation and transformation – cannot be the subject of painting.” (1919) </li></ul><ul><li>Can you see the influence of icon painting, cubism and other avant-garde ideas (futurism) in her works? </li></ul>
    7. 7. Popova <ul><li>“ Sketch for Portrait” (1915) </li></ul>
    8. 8. Popova <ul><li>“ Painterly Architectonics” (1916) </li></ul>
    9. 9. Marc Chagall (1887-1985) <ul><li>Failed first art examination </li></ul><ul><li>Inspired by Jewish heritage, scriptures, Russian icons </li></ul><ul><li>1910, moved to Paris; influenced by cubism </li></ul><ul><li>1914 returned to Russia, 1923 returned to Paris </li></ul>
    10. 10. Self-portrait with seven fingers Chagall
    11. 11. Chagall Me and My Village
    12. 12. Filonov (1883-1941) <ul><li>1910, expelled Academy of Arts, Moscow </li></ul><ul><li>1913 travelled to Italy, France </li></ul><ul><li>Poetry, illustrator, theorist, painter </li></ul><ul><li>1919 exhibit in Petrograd </li></ul><ul><li>Ostracized for his controversial work </li></ul><ul><li>Died siege of Leningrad, 1941 </li></ul>
    13. 13. Filonov The Collective Farmworker
    14. 14. Filanov The Holy Family
    15. 15. Filonov (1883-1941) <ul><li>“The artist-proletarian’s obligation is not only to create works that answer the demands of today, but also to open the way to intellect into the distant future.” </li></ul><ul><li>“Think persistently and accurately over every atom of the work you are doing.” </li></ul>
    16. 16. Natal’ia Goncharova (1881-1962) <ul><li>Began with sculpture, then painting </li></ul><ul><li>Favorite theme: working Russian peasants </li></ul><ul><li>Influenced by icons and poster design for for Russian prints </li></ul><ul><li>Exhibited 700 paintings in one-woman show, August 1913 </li></ul>
    17. 17. Natal’ia Goncharova (1881-1962) <ul><li>“In the Artist’s Studio” (1907-1908) </li></ul><ul><li>“Green and Yellow Forest” (1912) </li></ul><ul><li>“The Cyclist” (1912-1913) </li></ul>
    18. 18. Goncharova In the artist’s studio, 1907-1908
    19. 19. Goncharova The Green and Yellow Forest, 1912 Next: The Cyclist, 1912-1913
    20. 21. Kandinskii (1866-1944) <ul><li>Painter, printmaker, stage designer, decorative artist, theorist </li></ul><ul><li>Interested in Russian folk art </li></ul><ul><li>Age 30 from lawyer to artist </li></ul><ul><li>Drawn to art that expresses “inner soul” </li></ul>
    21. 22. Kandinskii Blue Mountain, 1906-1911
    22. 23. Kandinskii Improvisation 6 (African), 1896-1911 Next: Flood Improvisation, 1911-1914
    23. 25. Kandinskii (1866-1944) <ul><li>“Color is the power which directly influences the soul. Color is the keyboard, the eyes are the hammers, the soul is the piano with the strings. The artist is the hand which plays, touching one key or another, to cause vibrations in the soul” </li></ul><ul><ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Munich, 1896-1911 (1) </li></ul></ul></ul></ul></ul>
    24. 26. Kandinskii (1866-1944) <ul><li>“Moscow” (1914-1921) </li></ul><ul><li>“Several Circles” (Bauhaus, 1922-1933) </li></ul><ul><li>“Colorful Ensemble” (Paris, 1934-1944) </li></ul>
    25. 30. Malevich (1878-1935) <ul><li>Cubo-Futurism unique to Russia </li></ul><ul><li>Most Russian artists painted “Cubo-Futurism” before moving to nonobjective art </li></ul><ul><li>Seen as process of “freeing itself” from European influence by focusing on Russian experiences </li></ul>
    26. 31. Malevich (1878-1935) <ul><li>“Self Portrait” </li></ul><ul><li>“Taking in the Harvest” </li></ul><ul><li>“Girls in a Field” (1928-1930) </li></ul>
    27. 35. Challenge Questions: <ul><li>In what way does a government control art and artists? Are any paintings in this slideshow considered propaganda? </li></ul><ul><li>Which paintings do you think could be considered Impressionist? Post-Impressionist? Modern? Why? </li></ul>
    28. 36. Sources of Slides... <ul><li>Portland Art Museum exhibit: “Painting Revolution: Kandinsky, Malevich and the Russian Avant-Garde” (November 1, 2000-January 7, 2001), Portland, Oregon. </li></ul><ul><li>Alexander Boguslawski. “Russian Painting” site: http://www.rollins.edu/Foreign_Lang/Russian (1998-2000) </li></ul><ul><li>Portland Art Museum: Picasso Postcard (Robert Doisneau) </li></ul>

    ×