Chapter 27: Pacific Northwest to Artic:  Native American Encounter A slide set supporting Humanities 103 and Gloria Fiero’...
Introduction <ul><li>As we look at selected slides from Artic, Alaskan, Canadian and Pacific Northwest tribal cultures, as...
What are the origins? <ul><li>Berengia (Bering Strait) between 10,000 to 5,000 years ago </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Dorset cult...
Dorset mask c. 500 BCE <ul><li>Hundreds of animal and human figures </li></ul><ul><li>Ivory, bone, stone </li></ul><ul><li...
Flying Bear,  Dorset c. 800 BCE
Four key elements of native American culture: <ul><li>The mask </li></ul><ul><li>The dance </li></ul><ul><li>The song </li...
The Mask <ul><li>Contemporary Artic Mask Fairbanks, Alaska </li></ul>Source:  University of Alaska, Fairbanks
Northwest Coast <ul><li>Masks are hidden until used in ceremony </li></ul><ul><li>Creatures come from four domains:  sky w...
Raven Transformation Mask Pacific Northwest Source:  Seattle Art Museum
The Dance <ul><li>Chilkat Dancer Charles Jimmie, Sr.  Raven’s Fort,  Haines, Alaska </li></ul>
This Chilkat shawl was designed by men, woven by women, and worn by tribal elders at important rituals or clan gatherings.
Contemporary Fan Dance, Kodiak Dancers, Fairbanks, Alaska
‘ Ksan Historical Village <ul><li>‘ Ksan Historical Village preserves artifacts, ancient ways, and revives and passes on G...
Frog Clan, ‘Ksan
The Story <ul><li>Natar Ungalaq (1959-  ),  </li></ul><ul><li>Igloolik </li></ul><ul><li>Sedna with Hairbrush , 1985 </li>...
The Story <ul><li>Manasie Akpaliapik (1955-  ) </li></ul><ul><li>Respecting the Circle </li></ul><ul><li>Artic Whalebone c...
Types of Totems <ul><li>Legend totem (cultural hero) </li></ul><ul><li>History totem (clan history) </li></ul><ul><li>Fami...
Legend or History totem? <ul><li>Saxman Totem Park, Alaska </li></ul>
Clan Totem <ul><li>Eagle  Crest Pole, Alaska </li></ul>
‘ Ksan Historical Village:  Clan Totems
Clan Totem <ul><li>Front wall,  Chief Shakes’  Tribal House Wrangell,  Alaska, c. 1940 </li></ul>
Family Crest (House Pole):  Interior, Chief Shakes’ Tribal House, ‘Ksan
Replica of Tlingit house, Ketchican, Alaska
History Totem (Clan history) <ul><li>Raven Crest Pole, Tlingit, Sitka </li></ul>
Memorial Totem (Ridicule pole) <ul><li>Trader Legend  Pole, Sitka </li></ul>
Clan Totem <ul><li>Totem Park, Klawock, Alaska c. 1930 </li></ul>
Contemporary Clan Totem, University of Alaska, Fairbanks
George Catlin (1796-1872) <ul><li>Ball-play of the Choctaw—Ball up , 1846–50 Choctaw.  The game was called “little brother...
George Catlin (1796-1872) <ul><li>Stu-mick-o-súcks, Buffalo Bull's Back Fat, Head Chief, Blood Tribe , 1832 Blackfoot/Kain...
George Catlin (1796-1872) <ul><li>Pigeon's Egg Head (The Light) Going to and Returning from Washington , 1837–39 Assiniboi...
What’s Next? <ul><li>What is unique or new to you about these native cultures? </li></ul><ul><li>In what ways does Caitlin...
Resources <ul><li>Postcards collected in Canada and Alaska, Summer 1994 </li></ul><ul><li>Seattle Art Museum, San Francisc...
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Chap27 Pnw

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  • Interactive map of Berengia: http://www.anth.ucsb.edu/faculty/stsmith/classes/anth3/courseware/Mesolithic/movies/Berengia.html
  • Postcard, University of Alaska, Fairbanks
  • Seattle Art Museum
  • Postcard, Alaska
  • Postcard, K’san Village
  • Postcard, University of Alaska, Fairbanks
  • Postcard, K’san Village
  • University of Alaska, Fairbanks
  • University of Alaska, Fairbanks
  • Postcard, K’san Village
  • Postcard, Alaska
  • Postcard, K’san Village
  • Postcard, K’san Village
  • Postcard, K’san Village
  • Postcard, Alaska
  • Postcard, K’san Village
  • Postcard, K’san Village
  • Postcard, Alaska
  • Postcard, University of Alaska, Fairbanks
  • Catlin was a big fan of Choctaw lacrosse, which he witnessed in Indian Territory in 1834. He described ball-play as &amp;quot;a school for the painter or sculptor, equal to any of those which ever inspired the hand of the artist in the Olympian games or the Roman forum.&amp;quot; Lacrosse was a physical, even violent, game called &amp;quot;little brother of war&amp;quot; in Choctaw that included no-holds-barred scuffling and wrestling as players struggled desperately for the ball.
  • Stu-mick-o-súcks, Buffalo Bull&apos;s Back Fat, Head Chief, Blood Tribe , 1832 Blackfoot/Kainai oil 29 x 24 in. Smithsonian American Art Museum, Gift of Mrs. Joseph Harrison, Jr. This magnificent portrait was painted at Fort Union &amp;quot;from the free and vivid realities of life&amp;quot; rather than &amp;quot;the haggard deformities and distortions of disease and death&amp;quot; Catlin noted among frontier Indians. Buffalo Bull&apos;s Back Fat (named after the most delectable cut of bison) was a chief of the Blackfoot, a tribe of the northernmost Plains whose territory straddled the present-day border between the United States and Canada. Catlin considered the people of the northern Plains the least corrupted by white contact, and helped establish their image as nature&apos;s sovereign nobility in Europe as well as America. This commanding portrait, for example, was exhibited to favorable notice in the Paris Salon of 1846.
  • Pigeon&apos;s Egg Head (The Light) Going to and Returning from Washington , 1837–39 Assiniboine/Nakoda oil 29 x 24 in. Smithsonian American Art Museum, Gift of Mrs. Joseph Harrison, Jr. Eighteen months later, the artist met Pigeon&apos;s Egg Head on his return home to the northern Plains. In this before-and-after portrait, Catlin shows the Assiniboine arriving in Washington in a splendid buckskin suit, as noble and classic in its own way as the architecture of the Capitol in the background. On his return, dressed in a &amp;quot;general&apos;s&amp;quot; uniform accessorized with umbrella, fan, and bottles of whiskey, all gifts of the government, he made a far less harmonious sight. The final indignity was &amp;quot;a pair of water-proof boots, with high heels, which made him &apos;step like a yoked hog.&apos;&amp;quot; His tribesmen rejected his descriptions of the white man&apos;s cities, and his persistence in telling &amp;quot;evil lies&amp;quot; eventually led to his murder. Catlin&apos;s message—civilization destroys Indian culture—doesn&apos;t get much clearer than this.
  • Rattle , mid 19th century object no. 55.256 wood; leather unknown Haida; Tsimshian The expressive face on this rattle is thought to represent the sun or the moon, in part because of its roundness and in part because of the raylike encircling band. Rattle consists of two halves joined together by thongs.
  • http://americanart.si.edu/catlin/highlights.html
  • Chap27 Pnw

    1. 1. Chapter 27: Pacific Northwest to Artic: Native American Encounter A slide set supporting Humanities 103 and Gloria Fiero’s The Humanistic Tradition Instructor Beth Camp, LBCC, Spring 2006 [email_address]
    2. 2. Introduction <ul><li>As we look at selected slides from Artic, Alaskan, Canadian and Pacific Northwest tribal cultures, ask: </li></ul><ul><ul><li>How do these images reinforce or contradict the romantic pictures painted by Catlin in Chapter 27? </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Click on the SOUND ICONS throughout for a little extra background. </li></ul></ul>
    3. 3. What are the origins? <ul><li>Berengia (Bering Strait) between 10,000 to 5,000 years ago </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Dorset culture (800 BCE) </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Thule culture (1000 CE) </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Map Image from: Yukon Beringia Interpretive Center </li></ul></ul>
    4. 4. Dorset mask c. 500 BCE <ul><li>Hundreds of animal and human figures </li></ul><ul><li>Ivory, bone, stone </li></ul><ul><li>Petroglyphs </li></ul><ul><li>Magico-religious shaman-artists </li></ul><ul><li>Fertility figures </li></ul><ul><li>Some ritually “killed” </li></ul>
    5. 5. Flying Bear, Dorset c. 800 BCE
    6. 6. Four key elements of native American culture: <ul><li>The mask </li></ul><ul><li>The dance </li></ul><ul><li>The song </li></ul><ul><li>The story </li></ul>
    7. 7. The Mask <ul><li>Contemporary Artic Mask Fairbanks, Alaska </li></ul>Source: University of Alaska, Fairbanks
    8. 8. Northwest Coast <ul><li>Masks are hidden until used in ceremony </li></ul><ul><li>Creatures come from four domains: sky world, mortal world, undersea world, spirit world </li></ul><ul><li>Potlatch ritual from “beginning of time” </li></ul>
    9. 9. Raven Transformation Mask Pacific Northwest Source: Seattle Art Museum
    10. 10. The Dance <ul><li>Chilkat Dancer Charles Jimmie, Sr. Raven’s Fort, Haines, Alaska </li></ul>
    11. 11. This Chilkat shawl was designed by men, woven by women, and worn by tribal elders at important rituals or clan gatherings.
    12. 12. Contemporary Fan Dance, Kodiak Dancers, Fairbanks, Alaska
    13. 13. ‘ Ksan Historical Village <ul><li>‘ Ksan Historical Village preserves artifacts, ancient ways, and revives and passes on Gitksan art and culture </li></ul><ul><li>Gitsan people of the Skeena, British Columbia share language roots with Tsimshian people and have 4 clans: the Wolf, Fireweed, Frog and Eagle </li></ul>
    14. 14. Frog Clan, ‘Ksan
    15. 15. The Story <ul><li>Natar Ungalaq (1959- ), </li></ul><ul><li>Igloolik </li></ul><ul><li>Sedna with Hairbrush , 1985 </li></ul>
    16. 16. The Story <ul><li>Manasie Akpaliapik (1955- ) </li></ul><ul><li>Respecting the Circle </li></ul><ul><li>Artic Whalebone carving, 1989 </li></ul>
    17. 17. Types of Totems <ul><li>Legend totem (cultural hero) </li></ul><ul><li>History totem (clan history) </li></ul><ul><li>Family Crest totem (house poles) </li></ul><ul><li>Memorial totem (ridicule poles) </li></ul>
    18. 18. Legend or History totem? <ul><li>Saxman Totem Park, Alaska </li></ul>
    19. 19. Clan Totem <ul><li>Eagle Crest Pole, Alaska </li></ul>
    20. 20. ‘ Ksan Historical Village: Clan Totems
    21. 21. Clan Totem <ul><li>Front wall, Chief Shakes’ Tribal House Wrangell, Alaska, c. 1940 </li></ul>
    22. 22. Family Crest (House Pole): Interior, Chief Shakes’ Tribal House, ‘Ksan
    23. 23. Replica of Tlingit house, Ketchican, Alaska
    24. 24. History Totem (Clan history) <ul><li>Raven Crest Pole, Tlingit, Sitka </li></ul>
    25. 25. Memorial Totem (Ridicule pole) <ul><li>Trader Legend Pole, Sitka </li></ul>
    26. 26. Clan Totem <ul><li>Totem Park, Klawock, Alaska c. 1930 </li></ul>
    27. 27. Contemporary Clan Totem, University of Alaska, Fairbanks
    28. 28. George Catlin (1796-1872) <ul><li>Ball-play of the Choctaw—Ball up , 1846–50 Choctaw. The game was called “little brother of war”. </li></ul><ul><li>Image from Smithsonian </li></ul>
    29. 29. George Catlin (1796-1872) <ul><li>Stu-mick-o-súcks, Buffalo Bull's Back Fat, Head Chief, Blood Tribe , 1832 Blackfoot/Kainai </li></ul><ul><li>Image from Smithsonian </li></ul>
    30. 30. George Catlin (1796-1872) <ul><li>Pigeon's Egg Head (The Light) Going to and Returning from Washington , 1837–39 Assiniboine/Nakoda </li></ul><ul><li>Image from Smithsonian </li></ul>
    31. 31. What’s Next? <ul><li>What is unique or new to you about these native cultures? </li></ul><ul><li>In what ways does Caitlin’s work (Chapter 27) romanticize Native American beliefs and culture? </li></ul><ul><li>Have you visited the Portland Art Museum’s Native American collection? </li></ul>Rattle , mid 19th century, Haida; Tsimshian Portland Art Museum: “The expressive face on this rattle is thought to represent the sun or the moon, in part because of its roundness and in part because of the raylike encircling band. Rattle consists of two halves joined together by thongs.”
    32. 32. Resources <ul><li>Postcards collected in Canada and Alaska, Summer 1994 </li></ul><ul><li>Seattle Art Museum, San Francisco Museum </li></ul><ul><li>George Catlin and His Indian Gallery, Virtual Exhibit </li></ul><ul><li>Peter Jensen, LBCC English Dept. </li></ul>

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