Digital Citizenship Education
in Saskatchewan Schools
A Webinar for School Divisions and Schools
September 30, 2015
Joanna...
Webinar Recording Access
To access a recording of this
webinar and the presentation
slides following this session, visit
t...
Webinar Outline
1. Background and Introduction
2. What is Digital Citizenship?
3. Overview of the Guide
4. Overview of the...
Digital Citizenship Education in Saskatchewan Schools
BACKGROUND AND INTRODUCTION
Digital Citizenship in
Saskatchewan Schools
A Policy Planning Guide for School Divisions and
Schools to Implement Digital ...
Key outcomes state that both
students and educators need to
be able to use technology safely
and effectively to communicat...
Saskatchewan’s Action Plan to Address Bullying and Cyberbullying
• Released in November 2013
• Hon. Jennifer Campeau, MLA ...
Saskatchewan’s Action Plan
to Address Bullying and Cyberbullying
Support Students to Develop Responsible and Appropriate
O...
Saskatchewan’s Action Plan
to Address Bullying and Cyberbullying
Proposed Action: Support the instruction of appropriate
a...
Digital Citizenship Education and the
Education Sector Strategic Plan Connections
to the
ESSP
Consultations identified the...
How Was the Guide Created?
Ministry officials collaborated with:
A small working group consisting of school
division consu...
Digital Citizenship Education in Saskatchewan Schools
WHAT IS DIGITAL CITIZENSHIP?
What is Digital Citizenship?
“Digital Citizenship can be
defined as the norms of
appropriate and responsible
online behavi...
What is Digital Citizenship?
“Digital Citizenship is more than just a
teaching tool, it is a way to prepare students
for a...
Source: Dr. Mike Ribble, http://digitalcitizenship.net
Digital Citizenship Education in Saskatchewan Schools
OVERVIEW OF THE GUIDE
Who is the Guide for?
Audience
Main audience:
• School Divisions Officials
• In-School Administrators
Other interested aud...
How Should this Guide Be Used?
Purpose
The Digital Citizenship Guide:
• Outlines a common frame of reference for the conce...
What is the Big Idea? Key
Concept
“Digital Citizenship is not intended to be a
stand-alone course, lesson or unit. Rather ...
How Does this Fit into Curriculum? Curricular
Connections
Cross-curricular Competencies:
• Provide a curricular rationale ...
What’s in the Guide?
Overview
From “Acceptable Use”
to “Digital Citizenship”
Content
Example
Acceptable Use Policy
• Is presented in the format of what ...
Key Considerations and Questions
for Discussions with Stakeholders Content
Example
Outline of each
element
Questions for
d...
Digital Citizenship Education in Saskatchewan Schools
OVERVIEW OF THE CONTINUUM
Digital Citizenship Continuum
Intent: used to plan for instructional integration of digital
citizenship concepts and skill...
K-12
Continuum
Important questions for
the consideration of
lifelong learners What do we want
students to know?
What do st...
Knowledge gained through understanding of concepts and skills experienced from K-12
K-12
Continuum
Digital Citizenship Con...
Planning
Tool
Digital Citizenship Continuum
Digital Citizenship Education in Saskatchewan Schools
SUPPORT FOR IMPLEMENTATION
Provided online professional development opportunity
#DCMOOC: a Massive Open Online Course on Digital Citizenship
• Introd...
Through a partnership with SaskTel and their “I Am
Stronger” campaign, the ministry is able to:
• provide a stand-alone si...
Provide access to licensed digital resources
for educators and students.
http://mediasmarts.ca
Implementation Support
Acce...
Host provincial Student First Anti-Bullying Forums.
2013 Student First Anti-Bullying Forum
Video: http://youtu.be/KSR2Wn1N...
Digital Citizenship Education in Saskatchewan Schools
HOW TO GET STARTED
Where to Start? School
Divisions
Considerations at the school division level:
• Do school board policies regarding the use...
Where to Start? Schools
Considerations for In-School Administrators:
• What is the digital citizenship policy guide and ho...
Where to Start? Schools
Considerations for In-School Administrators:
• Do current school policies and procedures need to b...
Where to Start? Teachers
Considerations for teachers:
• What are the current realities facing the students in my
class?
• ...
Where to Start? Teachers
Considerations for teachers:
• Am I modeling proper digital citizenship for my students?
• How ca...
Digital Citizenship Education in Saskatchewan Schools
QUESTIONS AND ANSWERS
Further Questions?
Please contact:
Joanna Sanders, Digital Fluency Consultant, Ministry of Education
Email: joanna.sanders...
Provincial Webinar: Digital Citizenship Education in Saskatchewan Schools
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Provincial Webinar: Digital Citizenship Education in Saskatchewan Schools

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Slides from the webinar that was held on September 30, 2015 about the release of the policy guide, Digital Citizenship Education in Saskatchewan Schools.

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  • Following this event, a recording of the webinar and the presentation slides will be made available on the I Am Stronger website.
  • Today we are here to talk about the recently released Digital Citizenship policy planning guide for schools and school divisions. Let’s start by sharing a little bit of background to know where this document came about and how it was created.
  • An existing policy document that is used when considering the use of technology in schools is the Technology in Education Policy Framework, released in June 2013. It outlines direction and outcomes with regards to the use of technology and is supportive of the premise that learning how to use technology effectively and safely is important.
  • The TEF was used in 2013, when Ms. Campeau announced Saskatchewan’s Action Plan to Address Bullying and Cyberbullying after months of research and public consultations. This plan proposed key actions that can be taken to provide students, families and schools with the knowledge, skills, resources and supports to help children and youth to feel safe and accepted at school, in their community and online. The four themes contained in the action plan that emerged through the consultation and research process will guide the creation of safe, caring and accepting schools for all Saskatchewan children and youth.
  • The Action Plan stated 6 key recommendations to address bullying and cyberbullying in the province. The topic of today’s presentation, the focus on digital citizenship education, comes from the fourth recommendation in the report.
  • The second part of the report contained a number of proposed actions to act upon the recommendations. The proposed actions to support the instruction of appropriate and responsible online behaviour includes supports for school divisions, schools, teachers, students and parents.
  • We learned through, both through our anti-bullying consultations in 2013 and our Student First engagement process in 2014 that our students, schools and families need support to deal with online bullying. This type of bullying can occur at anytime, anywhere, both inside and outside of school buildings, due to the widespread use of social media and handheld devices. Social bullying can interfere with student success at school and we need to work together to ensure we create safe, caring, inclusive and accepting schools and communities.

    Student First engagements also identified the need for students to be able to access technology as a part of a quality learning environment. Through the Education Sector Strategic Plan, we are working with the sector to improve graduation rates. This includes ensuring that each student is engaged in their learning, and is equipped and supported to achieve success. By offering opportunities for our students to use technology in an engaging school environment, they will learn how to use it responsibly and appropriately in their everyday lives. Our teachers and administrators also need supports and professional learning opportunities to help ensure that they are equipped with the knowledge and skills necessary to effectively infuse technology into their classrooms.
  • Using a Student First approach, this guide was developed in collaboration with the sector. Consultations were done with a small working group and the writing and research were done under contract with University of Regina professor, Dr. Alec Couros and sessional lecturer, Katia Hildebrandt.
  • Dr. Mike Ribble, co-author of Digital Citizenship in Schools, first defined Digital Citizenship in 2007. Dr. Ribble has become a leading expert on this concept. According to Dr. Ribble, digital citizenship can be defined as the norms of appropriate and responsible online behaviour.
  • Dr. Ribble also states that digital citizenship is more than just a teaching tool, it is a way to prepare students for a society full of technology. Digital citizenship instruction is a shared responsibility. It is something every teacher needs to take into account when planning for instruction, regardless of grade or subject.

    When we take into account that it is the student and their needs that we are trying to address through our lessons, we need to make our instruction relevant and engaging to support their success. We have a shared responsibility for preparing students to be able to live, work and play in a digital world. That is their reality. They need to be able to see that there is no difference between a digital world and the real world. It is the same place and we all live there.
  • To help us to better understand the concept of digital citizenship, Dr. Ribble broke it down into three main categories (Respect, Educate and Protect) that further sub-divide to give us a total of 9 elements of digital citizenship. All elements are equally important concepts to understand and have been used to frame an outline of the concepts covered in this guide.
  • Earlier, when we looked at the definition of digital citizenship, we saw that there is no difference between the real world and the digital world. That is the world we live in. Just like we don’t have our students learn about the world around them by memorizing a list of rules and procedures and then act them out without question or context, we need to infuse digital citizenship skills and concepts into the subject matter they are learning about. These aren’t stand-alone lessons, courses or units but essentially real-life examples and experiences that work into the context of what students are learning.
  • The document “Saskatchewan Cross Curricular Competencies”, that was released by the ministry in 2010, states that cross curricular competencies are addressed through all areas of study and through school and classroom routines, relationships, and environments. Such inclusive, culturally diverse, resource-rich environments include increasingly networked, technology-rich classrooms. Embedded within these competencies is the effective use of technology for teaching and learning. This digital citizenship document was developed as a support to help guide the infusion of digital citizenship concepts and skills into the classroom and not a curriculum correlation document.

    Teachers know their students and subject matter best. They are professionals and use that professional judgment when planning their lessons. Just like we differentiate instruction to meet individual student’s academic and physical needs, we need to consider the reality our students are living day-to-day when planning our lessons.

    For example, how students learn about access to the Internet is going to vary depending on the circumstances and reality the students in the class are living. Students in remote northern and rural communities might have different understandings and needs then the students who attend a large suburban school with unlimited access to strong and stable Wi-Fi and an abundance of personal devices. The concept of access still needs to be explored but the approach will be different. Students with less access might need to spend more time to explore why they need access and why they might not have the best access and possibly explore solutions to the problem. Students who have no trouble with access might need support to understand when it is appropriate and not appropriate to use their personal devices. Just because we have them, do we always need to be using them?
  • This graphic from the guide provides a frame for the reader to help them to understand and plan for the implementation of digital citizenship education into a school division, school and classroom. Plans will need to be developed at a number of levels to help ensure everyone that supports our students in their lives is part of the discussion and the process. Plans may vary from school to school and school division to school division depending on a number of factors, including existing policies and procedures, student needs, existing infrastructure and technology plans, the comfort level of employees and parent interest and support.
  • An example from the guide to consider when developing school division or school-level digital citizenship policies is the section on acceptable use policies and responsible use policies: (pg. 13 in DC Guide)

    It is important to recognize that while many schools already have in place Acceptable Use Policies (AUPs) that outline the use of technology in classrooms, these policies are often restrictive and are intended to control or prohibit particular behaviours, and they often operate on the principle that students will lose the privilege of technology if they do not follow certain rules. Digital citizenship policies, on the other hand, represent a more comprehensive view of technology-enhanced learning; they are based the concept of “one life” and therefore acknowledge the important role that online spaces play in education as well as students’ right to access, and they provide a framework for teaching students to act responsibly in digital spaces.

    In the Digital Citizenship Continuum, it is suggested that the development of a Responsible Use Policies be done with students. This activity could be at the beginning of the year and put into student friendly language and context. This helps students to understand their part, how their actions impact others and how they can help to ensure that they have a clear understanding of expectations regarding the use of technology in their classroom. It is recommended that once a responsible use policy is co-constructed with students, that it be revisited periodically throughout the year during regular instruction. Example could include a reminder when bringing in a laptop cart to do research about how to use online research time effectively or when students are pulling out their own devices to do an interactive lesson with the teacher or to schedule an assignment reminder in their calendars. All of these things help students to develop responsible habits when using technology.
  • The guide contains a framework for discussion that provides an outline of the elements of digital citizenship, key considerations for schools and school divisions to consider with regards to each element as well as questions for discussion with stakeholders. Stakeholders can include school division leaders, school-based leaders, teachers, parents, students and other community members. After consideration and discussion of these questions, a school division and/or school can then develop their own digital citizenship policies and proceedures.
  • Intended to be used as a guide to help plan for the integration of digital citizenship instruction.
    Contains essential questions and knowledge for all and then suggests understandings at age appropriate levels.
    Organized by curricular grade groupings using Ribble’s 9 elements divided into 3 categories: respect, educate and protect.
    These 3 categories should be taught beginning at the kindergarten level and span through Grade 12.
  • The concept of Ribble’s nine elements of digital citizenship is explained in detail in this guide. The nine elements have been divided into three categories:
    Respect (digital etiquette, digital access and digital law)
    Educate (digital communication, digital literacy, digital commerce); and,
    Protect (digital rights and responsibilities, digital safety and security, digital health and wellness).
     
    These three categories should be taught beginning at the kindergarten level and span through Grade 12. The digital citizenship continuum is to be used as a guide for in-school leadership and teachers in the classroom to help integrate digital citizenship instruction into the classroom. It contains the essential questions and knowledge that everyone needs to know at all levels and then is divided into four levels to create age appropriate understanding and demonstration of understanding.
  • If you look at the continuum for one of the nine elements, in this instance digital etiquette, you can look at how the essential questions and knowledge address the element. There are then suggestions for how to support students to understand the concepts as well as what students can do to help demonstrate their understanding of the concepts.
  • The creation of the digital citizenship continuum was a big request from the field as teachers that we talked to wanted to know where to start and where to focus their energies when integrating digital citizenship concepts and skills into their teaching. Digital citizenship instruction is a shared responsibility. It is something every teacher needs to take into account when planning for instruction because we are all sharing the responsibility or teaching students who need to prepare for .

    It was created with the understanding that every teacher has different students and responsibilities through the classes and subjects they are assigned to teach. There is also a varying degree of opportunities for the infusion of technology into classrooms due to access and appropriateness to use technology with students. Therefore, the use of technology isn’t always necessary in order to address digital citizenship concepts and skills in instruction. They can be included in the stories we read, the discussions we have, the topics we write about and the explorations we embark upon.
  • In the spring of 2014, we offered a very successful massive open online course on digital citizenship. Its goal was to introduce the concept of digital citizenship to educational professionals and provided participants with the opportunity to discuss and explore the many issues and concerns we are experiencing when considering the digital realities our students are living. The course is archived and still accessible to those who want to access the lessons and resources contained within the course.
  • Through a partnership with SaskTel’s I Am Stronger campaign, we are able to:
    house anti-bullying resources for the ministry, including digital citizenship resources.
    provides a place for youth to connect and get involved in making their communities a better place.
    host the online reporting tool for students to report bullying incidents.
    provide access to grants of up to $1,000 to support youth led initiatives in schools and communities.
  • MediaSmarts is a Canadian not-for-profit charitable organization for digital and media literacy. Their vision is that children and youth have the critical thinking skills to engage with media as active and informed digital citizens.
    The majority of their resources are free and through a provincial licensing agreement, teachers and students can access the licensed student learning modules and professional development workshops. Please contact me for more information or if you have trouble accessing the licensed resources. My contact information is at the end of this presentation.
  • The forum is an opportunity for students to share their experiences, work together to find possible solutions to address bullying and to encourage student responsibility in schools, communities and online. At the in-person forums in 2013 and 2014, students were encouraged to share the ideas from the forum with their schools so that together, they could work to create a safe and accepting learning environment for everyone. 
    The next forum is being planned during anti-bullying week in November 2015. It is being planned to be held using a virtual platform, rather than in-person, in order to offer the opportunity to participate in the forum to as many students as possible. This is your opportunity to put the digital citizenship guide into practice as many of the proposed activities being offered support concepts and skills contained in the guide and the continuum. We encourage you to check out the youth forum page on the I Am Stronger website to sign up your class for this great learning opportunity. This year’s forum is open to students in Grades 6-12.
  • Provincial Webinar: Digital Citizenship Education in Saskatchewan Schools

    1. 1. Digital Citizenship Education in Saskatchewan Schools A Webinar for School Divisions and Schools September 30, 2015 Joanna Sanders, Digital Fluency Consultant Ministry of Education
    2. 2. Webinar Recording Access To access a recording of this webinar and the presentation slides following this session, visit the digital citizenship section of the I Am Stronger website. VISIT http://iamstronger.ca
    3. 3. Webinar Outline 1. Background and Introduction 2. What is Digital Citizenship? 3. Overview of the Guide 4. Overview of the Continuum 5. Support for Implementation 6. How to Get Started 7. Questions and Answers
    4. 4. Digital Citizenship Education in Saskatchewan Schools BACKGROUND AND INTRODUCTION
    5. 5. Digital Citizenship in Saskatchewan Schools A Policy Planning Guide for School Divisions and Schools to Implement Digital Citizenship from Kindergarten to Grade 12 http://goo.gl/I7koPsVISIT
    6. 6. Key outcomes state that both students and educators need to be able to use technology safely and effectively to communicate and collaborate with others in a global digital society. http://www.education.gov.sk.ca/TEF Saskatchewan’s Technology in Education Framework VISIT
    7. 7. Saskatchewan’s Action Plan to Address Bullying and Cyberbullying • Released in November 2013 • Hon. Jennifer Campeau, MLA & Former Legislative Secretary to the Minister of Education for the Anti-Bullying Initiative http://www.saskatchewan.ca/residents/education-and-learning/anti-bullyingVISIT
    8. 8. Saskatchewan’s Action Plan to Address Bullying and Cyberbullying Support Students to Develop Responsible and Appropriate Online Behaviour Recognizing that all students need to learn the proper knowledge and necessary skills to develop appropriate and responsible online behaviour and that teachers and schools will need support to ensure this important work occurs starting in Kindergarten through Grade 12: Recommendation #4: It is recommended that the Government of Saskatchewan work with school divisions to provide teacher instructional supports and student resources to teach appropriate and responsible online behavior to all Kindergarten through Grade 12 students.
    9. 9. Saskatchewan’s Action Plan to Address Bullying and Cyberbullying Proposed Action: Support the instruction of appropriate and responsible online behaviour for Kindergarten through Grade 12 students. The Ministry of Education: • should provide school divisions with model digital citizenship policies and guidelines for local adaptation and implementation; • should work with school divisions to provide teachers with instructional supports and professional development opportunities and students with digital learning resources.
    10. 10. Digital Citizenship Education and the Education Sector Strategic Plan Connections to the ESSP Consultations identified the importance of access to technology to support quality learning environments. Consultations identified need for supports to deal with online bullying. ESSP works to improve graduation rates by ensuring each student is engaged in their learning, equipped and supported to achieve success. Opportunities to use technology in an engaging school environment will help to support our students to use it safely and responsibly in the future. Supports and professional learning opportunities are needed for teachers and administrators to effectively infuse technology into the classroom.
    11. 11. How Was the Guide Created? Ministry officials collaborated with: A small working group consisting of school division consultants. Dr. Alec Couros and Katia Hildebrandt, contracted researchers and writers from the University of Regina.
    12. 12. Digital Citizenship Education in Saskatchewan Schools WHAT IS DIGITAL CITIZENSHIP?
    13. 13. What is Digital Citizenship? “Digital Citizenship can be defined as the norms of appropriate and responsible online behaviour.” - Dr. Mike Ribble, http://digitalcitizenship.net
    14. 14. What is Digital Citizenship? “Digital Citizenship is more than just a teaching tool, it is a way to prepare students for a society full of technology.” - Dr. Mike Ribble
    15. 15. Source: Dr. Mike Ribble, http://digitalcitizenship.net
    16. 16. Digital Citizenship Education in Saskatchewan Schools OVERVIEW OF THE GUIDE
    17. 17. Who is the Guide for? Audience Main audience: • School Divisions Officials • In-School Administrators Other interested audiences: • Teachers • School Community Councils
    18. 18. How Should this Guide Be Used? Purpose The Digital Citizenship Guide: • Outlines a common frame of reference for the concept of digital citizenship by defining what it is in the context of learning and teaching. • Provides supports for school divisions and schools to plan for the integration of digital citizenship instruction through all grades and subjects.
    19. 19. What is the Big Idea? Key Concept “Digital Citizenship is not intended to be a stand-alone course, lesson or unit. Rather it is best learned and understood when taught in context through real-life examples and experiences.”
    20. 20. How Does this Fit into Curriculum? Curricular Connections Cross-curricular Competencies: • Provide a curricular rationale for teaching digital citizenship • Highlight both the general importance of technology in teaching and learning and specific citizenship-related competencies such as the ability to “communicate effectively and ethically”. • Was used to help inform the creation of the Digital Citizenship K-12 Continuum to help guide instructional integration of these concepts and skills.
    21. 21. What’s in the Guide? Overview
    22. 22. From “Acceptable Use” to “Digital Citizenship” Content Example Acceptable Use Policy • Is presented in the format of what the student “shouldn’t do” • Defines the rules that learners and educators must follow and may limit technology use • Often restrictive, intended to control or prohibit particular behaviours • Often operate on the assumption that students will lose the privilege of technology if they do not follow certain rules Responsible Use Policy • Is presented in the format of what the student “should do” • Increased student responsibility for use of technology to support learning • Developed with students to create common understanding of the responsibility of accessing online technologies as part of the learning process • Can contain clear expectations regarding the use of technology in the classroom
    23. 23. Key Considerations and Questions for Discussions with Stakeholders Content Example Outline of each element Questions for discussion Key considerations
    24. 24. Digital Citizenship Education in Saskatchewan Schools OVERVIEW OF THE CONTINUUM
    25. 25. Digital Citizenship Continuum Intent: used to plan for instructional integration of digital citizenship concepts and skills Contains: essential questions and knowledge for everyone then suggests understandings and skills at age appropriate levels Organized: by curricular grade groupings divided into three categories (respect, educate and protect) Taught: beginning in Kindergarten and span through Grade 12 K-12 Continuum Digital Citizenship Continuum K-2 3-5 6-9 10-12 Understand Do Understand Do Understand Do Understand Do ESSENTIAL QUESTIONS AND KNOWLEDGE FOR LIFELONG LEARNING
    26. 26. K-12 Continuum Important questions for the consideration of lifelong learners What do we want students to know? What do students need to understand? What do we want students to be able to do? Organized into four grade groupings Organized by category and element Digital Citizenship Continuum
    27. 27. Knowledge gained through understanding of concepts and skills experienced from K-12 K-12 Continuum Digital Citizenship Continuum
    28. 28. Planning Tool Digital Citizenship Continuum
    29. 29. Digital Citizenship Education in Saskatchewan Schools SUPPORT FOR IMPLEMENTATION
    30. 30. Provided online professional development opportunity #DCMOOC: a Massive Open Online Course on Digital Citizenship • Introduced the concept of digital citizenship. • Delivered online and free to over 900 registered participants. • Facilitated by Dr. Alec Couros from the University of Regina. • #DCMOOC ran in May and June 2014. • Materials have been archived and are accessible online. • Online communities were established using Twitter and Google+ and continue to be active.http://dcmooc.ca Implementation Support PD Opportunity VISIT
    31. 31. Through a partnership with SaskTel and their “I Am Stronger” campaign, the ministry is able to: • provide a stand-alone site for students, teachers and families to access anti-bullying resources; • co-sponsor community grants up to $1,000 for youth led initiatives; and, • host the anonymous student online tool for reporting bullying incidents. http://iamstronger.ca Implementation Support One-Stop Access to Resources VISIT
    32. 32. Provide access to licensed digital resources for educators and students. http://mediasmarts.ca Implementation Support Access to Canadian Resources VISIT
    33. 33. Host provincial Student First Anti-Bullying Forums. 2013 Student First Anti-Bullying Forum Video: http://youtu.be/KSR2Wn1N5Cw 2014 Student First Anti-Bullying Forum Video: http://youtu.be/7KSlb0xyj8w Calling all Grade 6-12 teachers and students! Register your class today for the 2015 Student First Anti-Bullying Virtual Forum being held online during National Anti-Bullying Awareness Week in November. Implementation Support Youth Engagement http://iamstronger.caVISIT
    34. 34. Digital Citizenship Education in Saskatchewan Schools HOW TO GET STARTED
    35. 35. Where to Start? School Divisions Considerations at the school division level: • Do school board policies regarding the use technology in schools need to be reviewed and updated? • How will the availability of this guide be communicated to in-school administrators and what expectations does the school division have for how it should be used in schools? • What needs and supports are required from the school division level to support implementation?
    36. 36. Where to Start? Schools Considerations for In-School Administrators: • What is the digital citizenship policy guide and how can it be used for school planning purposes? • Are the students in the school using technology respectfully and responsibly? • Are student activities that occur online outside of school impacting the learning environment in the school? • What do stakeholders (students, staff and the School Community Council) think about the need for digital citizenship instruction in the school?
    37. 37. Where to Start? Schools Considerations for In-School Administrators: • Do current school policies and procedures need to be updated? • How will teaching staff need to be supported to infuse digital citizenship concepts and skills into their teaching? • What supports are required to support implementation?
    38. 38. Where to Start? Teachers Considerations for teachers: • What are the current realities facing the students in my class? • Are the students in my class using technology respectfully and responsibly? • Are student activities that occur online outside of school impact the learning environment in the classroom? • What are the current school board policies and procedures regarding the use technology in schools?
    39. 39. Where to Start? Teachers Considerations for teachers: • Am I modeling proper digital citizenship for my students? • How can I begin to infuse the continuum’s suggested concepts and skills into my current practice? • Who is available to support me if I have questions or need help? How can I collaborate with other teachers? • What are the learning resources available to me and my students to deepen our understanding of digital citizenship?
    40. 40. Digital Citizenship Education in Saskatchewan Schools QUESTIONS AND ANSWERS
    41. 41. Further Questions? Please contact: Joanna Sanders, Digital Fluency Consultant, Ministry of Education Email: joanna.sanders@gov.sk.ca Twitter: @MmeSanders

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