Successfully reported this slideshow.
We use your LinkedIn profile and activity data to personalize ads and to show you more relevant ads. You can change your ad preferences anytime.

Workshop: Lessons from Online and edX / MITx Courses

807 views

Published on

Presented by Brandon Muramatsu and M.S. Vijay Kumar at KFUPM on August 27, 2014

Published in: Education
  • Be the first to comment

  • Be the first to like this

Workshop: Lessons from Online and edX / MITx Courses

  1. 1. Workshop: Lessons from Online and edX / MITx Courses M.S. Vijay Kumar, vkumar@mit.edu Brandon Muramatsu, mura@mit.edu Wednesday, August 27, 2014 Cite as: Kumar, V. & Muramatsu, B. (2014c, August). Lessons from online courses and edX / MITx courses. Workshop presented at KFUPM. Dhahran, Saudi Arabia. Unless otherwise specified this work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International License. 1
  2. 2. Agenda  Part 1: Introduction  Part 2: What are your online course experiences?  Part 3: A Brief History of MOOCs  Break  Part 4: Highlights of Online Courses and MOOCs Unless otherwise specified this work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International License. 2
  3. 3. Part 1: Introduction Unless otherwise specified this work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International License. 3
  4. 4. Vijay’s Background  B.Tech. in Chemical Engineering, M.S. in Industrial Management & Ed.D. in Future Studies in Education  Research in educational technology innovation diffusion  Taught courses in introductory programming, data communications, instructional computing, future studies, and teacher education  30+ years in EdTech – Developing, managing, & innovating educational uses of information technologies  10+ years in Open Education: Open Educational Resources and OpenCourseWare Unless otherwise specified this work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International License. 4
  5. 5. Brandon’s Background  B.S. & M.S. in Mechanical Engineering  Taught multimedia design and open education  20+ years in EdTech  ~10 years in educational digital libraries: Collections, nationwide collaborations, quality and peer review  10+ years in Open Education: Open Educational Resources and OpenCourseWare  “Been There, Done That”  Multimedia courseware design and course support, course design, video production software design, digital libraries, metadata, learning objects, open educational resources/OpenCourseWare, … Unless otherwise specified this work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International License. 5
  6. 6. Goals & Objectives for the Workshops  Help you understand how we think about educational technologies, and how they support pedagogy and learning  See some examples of educational technologies, to help you understand a range of possibilities  Identify how KFUPM can implement online/digital learning Unless otherwise specified this work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International License. 6
  7. 7. Goals for this Morning  Understand your experiences with online courses and MOOC courses  Understand some of the highlights from online / digital courses and our edX / MITx experiences Unless otherwise specified this work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International License. 7
  8. 8. Part 2: What are your online course experiences? Unless otherwise specified this work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International License. Image on this slide licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-Sharealike 2.0 License. 8
  9. 9. What are your online course experiences?  Have you designed an online course?  What were your experiences?  Have you taken…  an online course?  a MOOC?  What were your experiences?  (Have you designed a MOOC?) Unless otherwise specified this work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International License. 9
  10. 10. Group Activity – Plus / Delta Worked Well Could be Improved Unless otherwise specified this work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International License. 10
  11. 11. A Brief History of MOOCs Unless otherwise specified this work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International License. 11
  12. 12. Day of the MOOC is licensed CC BY 3.0. No attribution requested by the author. Unless otherwise specified this work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International License. 12
  13. 13. A Brief History of MOOCs  The Canadians and cMOOCs  Artificial Intelligence course with 150,000+ registrants https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/  xMOOCs and a number of players  edX, Coursera, Udacity, FutureLearn, etc., etc. Unless otherwise specified this work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International License. 13 X 2.0/ MOOC Timeline by Phil Hill is licensed under CC BY-ND 3.0
  14. 14. What are key characteristics of a MOOC? Unless otherwise specified this work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International License. 14
  15. 15. Which of these features of MOOCs do you have now (in Blackboard)? Unless otherwise specified this work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International License. 15
  16. 16. What we find interesting about MOOCs  It is their scale!  Potential reach  Engaged users, varied backgrounds and needs  It is their departure from “traditional” online courses  Interleaving of content and varied parameterized assessment  Infinite formative assessment  Potential to radically change what we think of as an online course, and how we teach online / offline Unless otherwise specified this work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International License. 16
  17. 17. Break Unless otherwise specified this work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International License. 17
  18. 18. Part 3: Highlights of Online Courses and MOOCs Unless otherwise specified this work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International License. 18
  19. 19. Key Themes  Experimentation and validation  Learning outcomes/objectives and assessments  Modularity  Design of the experience Unless otherwise specified this work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International License. 19
  20. 20. Why MOOCs at MIT? Unless otherwise specified this work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International License. 20
  21. 21. Why did MIT start offering MOOCs / Online?  Advances our institutional mission  Builds upon MIT OpenCourseWare sharing of course materials  Increasing opportunity to use online to significantly impact learning at MIT  Enables us to focus on updating our teaching methods  Breaks down barriers of time and space (i2.002)  Enables us to rethink “courses” via modularity (i2.002)  Improve learning outcomes (3.091, Chemistry Bridge, 16.90)  Enable hands-on learning, and other “valuable” teaching / learning methods (3.091)  Future of Education at MIT Unless otherwise specified this work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International License. 21
  22. 22. 3.091 / 3.091x Unless otherwise specified this work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International License. Image courtesy of MIT/Prof. Michael Cima 22
  23. 23. 3.091 Introduction to Solid State Chemistry  One of two chemistry classes fulfilling MIT’s general education requirements in chemistry  Prof. Michael Cima developed 3.091x (MITx version of the course)  Course has learning objectives for each module, and assessments linked to those learning objectives  Originally skeptical of the approaches used in of 3.091x would be comparable to the residential course Unless otherwise specified this work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International License. 23
  24. 24. 3.091x Assessments  Originally skeptical of the approaches used in of 3.091x would be comparable to the residential course  Analyzing Fall 2012 data convinced the faculty that the online assessments were effective  3.091x learners did well on the final exam when compared with residential learners  Final exam questions were the same as those used with residential students Unless otherwise specified this work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International License. 24
  25. 25. 3.091x Assessments – Fall 2012  3.091x learners did well on the final exam when compared with residential learners  Final exam questions were the same as those used with residential students Unless otherwise specified this work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International License. 25 class: numerically correct answer; closed book (no partial credit) edx: first attempt to answer numerically correct score; open book Chart courtesy of MIT/Prof. Michael Cima
  26. 26. Impacting 3.091 at MIT  Experiment to see if replacing traditional homework assignments and in-class quizzes, with entirely online assessments would lead to same learning outcomes with MIT students  The secret? The answer is yes!  New Format—Proctored weekly quizzes  Created testing center proctored by TAs  Students come in and take online assessments every week; they can take the assessments multiple times but must wait 24 hours between attempts  In Class—More experiments and examples Unless otherwise specified this work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International License. 26
  27. 27. Comparing 3.091 in 2012 and 2013  Students scored significantly better on assessments (by learning outcome) using online assessments derived from 3.091x and no homework or quizzes. Unless otherwise specified this work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International License.
  28. 28. Workshop: Lessons from Online and edX / MITx Courses M.S. Vijay Kumar, vkumar@mit.edu Brandon Muramatsu, mura@mit.edu Cite as: Kumar, V. & Muramatsu, B. (2014c, August). Lessons from online courses and edX / MITx courses. Workshop presented at KFUPM. Dhahran, Saudi Arabia. Unless otherwise specified this work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International License. 28

×