Innovative Online Strategies at MIT

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Presented by Brandon Muramatsu at a NASA/MIT/NSTA Collaboration Meeting on January 24, 2014.

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  • Cite as: Muramatsu, B. (2014, January). Innovative Online Strategies at MIT. NASA-MIT-NSTA Collaboration Discussions. Washington, D.C. January 24, 2013. Unless otherwise specified this work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution 3.0 License.
  • Thank you. It’s a pleasure to be here. Thanks to XXX for inviting me to speak about MIT OpenCourseWare.My name is XXXXX and I am XXXXX for MIT OpenCourseWare.
  • In that initial proposal for OpenCourseWare, the faculty committee articulated a dual mission for OCW.The first part was to publish materials from all of MIT’s courses, and they felt very strongly on this point. They wanted OCW to represent the academic diversity of MIT, including not just the science, math and engineering subjects for which the Institute was best known, but also the humanities, social sciences, health sciences and other disciplines that were taught with a unique MIT flavor. And they set the goal of publishing all MIT courses well before anyone sat down to figure out how expensive it might be.The second goal was to extend the reach of MIT OCW and the OpenCourseWare concept. By this, they meant not only to ensure that MIT materials reached the widest possible audience, but that OCW would become a practice adopted by many other schools around the world. They recognized that for MIT to do this would produce some benefit, but for OpenCourseWare to truly transform education, it would have to become a movement shared by a great many institutions.
  • It’s hard for us to communicate just how big OCW is. 2,180 courses, means of course 2,180 syllabi and reading lists, but also notes from more than 18,000 lectures, 10,000 assignments, 1000 exams. About 40% of the exams include solutions, so you check your answers. And beyond the core teaching materials, we’ve included other kinds of enhanced materials, including video content in 117 courses—60 of which have their entire lectures recorded—complete text books, animations and simulations. The materials cover all 33 of MITs academic disciplines at both the undergraduate and graduate level.
  • 1 Summary, 16 focused on individual coursesSeminar at Harvard GSE (video recording available)
  • Cite as: Muramatsu, B. (2014, January). Innovative Online Strategies at MIT. NASA-MIT-NSTA Collaboration Discussions. Washington, D.C. January 24, 2013. Unless otherwise specified this work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution 3.0 License.
  • Innovative Online Strategies at MIT

    1. 1. Innovative Online Strategies at MIT Brandon Muramatsu, mura@mit.edu MIT Office of Digital Learning Cite as: Muramatsu, B. (2014, January). Innovative Online Strategies at MIT. NASA-MIT-NSTA Collaboration Discussions. Washington, D.C. January 24, 2014. Unless otherwise specified this work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution 3.0 License. 1
    2. 2. Background: Office of Digital Learning  Mission The Office of Digital Learning works to transform teaching and learning at MIT and around the globe through the innovative use of digital technologies.  Established November 2012  Key Area: Strategic Initiatives  Realize mission through collaborations at K-12, Community College, Higher Education and Corporate levels Unless otherwise specified this work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution 3.0 License. 3
    3. 3. ocw.mit.edu UNLOCKING KNOWLEDGE, EMPOWERING MINDS 4 Unlocking Knowledge, Empowering Minds
    4. 4. UNLOCKING KNOWLEDGE > DUAL MISSION • Publish core teaching materials—including syllabi, lecture notes, assignments and exams—from virtually all of MIT’s courses • Extend the reach and impact of OCW and the OpenCourseWare concept 5 Unlocking Knowledge, Empowering Minds
    5. 5. UNLOCKING KNOWLEDGE > 2,180 COURSES • 2,180 Syllabi & reading lists • 18,000+ lecture notes • 10,000+ assignments • 1,000+ exams • 700+ projects Many include: • Audio/video (~100) • Complete texts (~30) • Simulations/animations 6 Unlocking Knowledge, Empowering Minds
    6. 6. MIT’s Educational Outreach  Long history, deeply ingrained  MIT’s sharing benefits the world, and we believe, enhances MIT  Course Materials  MIT OpenCourseWare (2001)  Courses & Teaching  MITx (2011), then edX (2012)  The Experience  The ―special sauce‖, in and around Cambridge, MA; with peers, faculty, researchers, alumni, startups Unless otherwise specified this work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution 3.0 License.
    7. 7. Online Teacher Education  Project Details    Grant funded by Education Development Center (EDC) with US Agency for International Development funds 4 month project: May – September 2013 Deliverables  3 Online Courses  2+2+6 BLOSSOMS Modules  5 Workshops  Concept Tools  Online Course Design Guide Unless otherwise specified this work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution 3.0 License. 8
    8. 8. 3 Online Video-Based Courses Best Practices for Teaching and Learning 5 Sessions Mathlets: An Introduction 4 Hours Games and Learning 5 Weeks Unless otherwise specified this work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike 3.0 License. 9
    9. 9. blossoms.mit.edu 2+2 BLOSSOMS Modules +6 Translations to Urdu Monty Hall Tragedy of the Commons Kite Flying From Psychology to Logic Unless otherwise specified this work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike 3.0 License. 10
    10. 10. 5 Workshops 4 Day Visualization Workshop ½ Day Admin & Infrastructure Workshop 1 Day Online Course Design Workshop ½ Day EdTech Workshop ½ Day Concept Tools Workshop Unless otherwise specified this work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution 3.0 License. 11
    11. 11. mc3.mit.edu Concept Tools Concept Map Authoring Tool MC3 Browser Extension (Assign Resources to Concepts) Concept-Driven Repository Tool Unless otherwise specified this work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution 3.0 License. 12
    12. 12. CC/MIT: Community College Collaborations  Massachusetts Transformation Agenda   Advanced Manufacturing Case Studies and Online Learning Modules—building/sharing MIT’s strengths Guided Pathways to Success    Nascent collaboration Tools and infrastructure to link learning outcomes with courses, student information systems and real-time labor market information (Experiments around MITx courses) Unless otherwise specified this work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution 3.0 License. 13
    13. 13. MITx / edX  MITx: many meanings, many interests   Residential experiments utilizing MOOCs for blended learning   MOOC courses SPOC (―Small Private Online Course‖, aka Online Course) edX: Standalone non-profit organization    Major funding from MIT and Harvard Consortium of universities publishing MOOC courses Impact beyond MOOC courses  New organizational models, opportunity for discussion Unless otherwise specified this work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution 3.0 License. 14
    14. 14. Image: Andrew Ho and Issac Chuang Initial MITx & HarvardX Research Released on Tuesday, January 21, 2014 odl.mit.edu/mitx-working-papers harvardx.harvard.edu/harvardx-working-papers Unless otherwise specified this work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution 3.0 License. 15
    15. 15. Next Gen Science Standards MOOC  Goal Prepare K-12 educators to implement Next Gen Science Standards with their students.  Let’s look at research / observations that might influence design… Unless otherwise specified this work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution 3.0 License. 16
    16. 16. Engagement  What’s in a number?  Only registered  Only viewed  Explored (accessed half or more of chapters)  7.00x Introduction to Biology: The Secret of Life, Spring 2013 Certified Figure 3: Participants separated into four mutually exclusive and exhaustive categories (not to scale). Seaton, D. T., Reich, J., Nesterko, S, Mullaney, T., Waldo, J., Ho, A., & Chuang, I. (2014). 7.00x Introduction to Biology: The Secret of Life - Spring 2013 MITx Course Report (MITxwork is licensed under#9) Unless otherwise specified this Working Paper a Creative Commons Attribution 3.0 License. 17
    17. 17. Intent & Outcomes Figure 4: Scatter plot of grade versus chapters viewed (left), highlighting student sub-populations; certified students are red points and all points are jittered. Histograms of grades and number of chapters viewed (right) distinguished by student certification status. 7.00x Introduction to Biology: The Secret of Life, Spring 2013  What are the learners’ intent?  What do we want the outcomes to be? Seaton, D. T., Reich, J., Nesterko, S, Mullaney, T., Waldo, J., Ho, A., & Chuang, I. (2014). 7.00x Introduction to Biology: The Secret of Life - Spring 2013 MITx Course Report (MITxwork is licensed under#9) Unless otherwise specified this Working Paper a Creative Commons Attribution 3.0 License. 18
    18. 18. Support to Completion  Persistence beyond the first week is key  Given our goals, how can we support learners to completion? Figure 12. Average percentage of active registrants whose last action in a course is in a particular week. Ho, A. D., Reich, J., Nesterko, S., Seaton, D. T., Mullaney, T., Waldo, J., & Chuang, I. (2014). HarvardX and MITx: The first year of open online courses (HarvardX and MITx Working Paper No. 1). Unless otherwise specified this work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution 3.0 License. 19
    19. 19. Series and Duration University of California, Irvine Virtual Teacher Program A Specialization on Coursera: Your Pathway to Expertise www.coursera.org/specialization/virtualteacher/10/courses 20
    20. 20. Innovative Online Strategies at MIT Brandon Muramatsu, mura@mit.edu MIT Office of Digital Learning Cite as: Muramatsu, B. (2014, January). Innovative Online Strategies at MIT. NASA-MIT-NSTA Collaboration Discussions. Washington, D.C. January 24, 2014. Unless otherwise specified this work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution 3.0 License. 21

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