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Prioritization 301: An Advanced Roadmapping Class for Product People

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Prioritization 301: An Advanced Roadmapping Class for Product People

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Veteran Product Person Bruce McCarthy's funny and insightful presentation on how to make fanboys out of all your stakeholders by using objective criteria to prioritize your requirements and drive consensus.

As seen at ProductCamp Boston, June 2012.

Visit www.reqqs.com/resources for a Scorecard template in Excel and information on Reqqs - The Smart Roadmap Tool for Product People.

Veteran Product Person Bruce McCarthy's funny and insightful presentation on how to make fanboys out of all your stakeholders by using objective criteria to prioritize your requirements and drive consensus.

As seen at ProductCamp Boston, June 2012.

Visit www.reqqs.com/resources for a Scorecard template in Excel and information on Reqqs - The Smart Roadmap Tool for Product People.

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Prioritization 301: An Advanced Roadmapping Class for Product People

  1. 1. Prioritization 301 Advanced Roadmapping Class Bruce McCarthy Chief Product Person, Reqqs bruce@reqqs.com www.reqqs.com @d8a_driven
  2. 2. Why roadmaps matter
  3. 3. R
  4. 4. “Did [Previous PM] send you his spreadsheet of [5 trillion un- prioritized] feature requests?” - VP Product Management
  5. 5. “We need this to close [big deal] this quarter!” - Key Sales Person
  6. 6. “37% of our Support calls are about [oldest, hairiest part of the code]. Can’t we fix it?” - Support Manager
  7. 7. “[Shiny tech thing] will make [your top priority] much easier!” - Tech Lead
  8. 8. “[Previously irrelevant competitor] just shipped [shiny feature]. How are we going to leapfrog them?” - VP Marketing
  9. 9. “We gotta drop everything and work on [meaningless buzzword]. It’s gonna be huge!” - VP Sales
  10. 10. “If you don’t support [obscure platform] I can’t buy your stuff.” - Key Customer CTO
  11. 11. “Why would anybody schedule [easy feature] before [hard feature]? Who approved that [expletive] idea?” - CEO
  12. 12. “What’s your business case for [CEO’s pet project]? When do we make money?” - CFO
  13. 13. “You can’t add work without subtracting something? What, is your whole team lazy?” - CEO
  14. 14. Roadmap Process 1. Set Goals 2. Collect Ideas 3. Set Priorities 4. Get Buy-in 5. Define Releases 6. Communicate Roadmap 7. Build Product 8. Launch Product 9. Repeat
  15. 15. Roadmap Process 1. Set Goals 2. Collect Ideas Today’s 3. Set Priorities focus 4. Get Buy-in 5. Define Releases 6. Communicate Roadmap 7. Build Product 8. Launch Product 9. Repeat
  16. 16. Prioritization
  17. 17. Prioritization Important Basis of your roadmap Can determine success Inspires confidence Grooms your backlog Key PM skill
  18. 18. Prioritization Important Hard Basis of your roadmap Big backlogs Can determine success Competing goals Inspires confidence Multiple stakeholders Grooms your backlog Vocal customers Key PM skill Dependencies Risks
  19. 19. Methods I Don’t Recommend
  20. 20. Methods I Don’t Recommend
  21. 21. Methods I Don’t Recommend Engineer How to build the perfect solution no one will buy
  22. 22. Methods I Don’t Recommend Engineer How to build the perfect solution no one will buy CEO How to build a buzzword
  23. 23. Methods I Don’t Recommend Engineer How to build the perfect solution no one will buy CEO How to build a buzzword Sales How to never finish anything (and lose your devs)
  24. 24. Methods I Don’t Recommend Engineer How to build the perfect solution no one will buy CEO How to build a buzzword Sales How to never finish anything (and lose your devs) PM How long can you tread water?
  25. 25. Methods I Don’t Recommend Engineer How to build the perfect solution no one will buy CEO How to build a buzzword Sales How to never finish anything (and lose your devs) PM How long can you tread water? Customer How to stop growing
  26. 26. Methods I Don’t Recommend Engineer How to build the perfect solution no one will buy CEO How to build a buzzword Sales How to never finish anything (and lose your devs) PM How long can you tread water? Customer How to stop growing Analyst How to miss the market window
  27. 27. Math makes (almost) everything better
  28. 28. Value / Effort = Priority
  29. 29. High Value Low High Low Effort
  30. 30. High Value Low High Low Effort
  31. 31. Value / Effort = Priority Value = Expected Contribution to Defined Goals
  32. 32. Typical Goals
  33. 33. Typical Goals Grow the user base
  34. 34. Typical Goals Grow the user base Increase customer satisfaction
  35. 35. Typical Goals Grow the user base Increase customer satisfaction Improve performance
  36. 36. Typical Goals Grow the user base Increase customer satisfaction Improve performance Increase referrals
  37. 37. Typical Goals Grow the user base Increase customer satisfaction Improve performance Increase referrals Validated learning
  38. 38. Typical Goals Grow the user base Increase customer satisfaction Improve performance Increase referrals Validated learning Increase revenue this year
  39. 39. Typical Goals Grow the user base Increase customer satisfaction Improve performance Increase referrals Validated learning Increase revenue this year Transformation (revenue in future years)
  40. 40. Typical Goals Grow the user base Increase customer satisfaction Improve performance Increase referrals Validated learning Increase revenue this year Transformation (revenue in future years) Generate buzz
  41. 41. Value / Effort = Priority
  42. 42. Value / Effort = Priority Value = V1+V2+V3...
  43. 43. Value / Effort = Priority
  44. 44. Value / Effort = Priority (V1+V2+V3) / (E1+E2) x Certainty = P
  45. 45. Contribution
  46. 46. Contribution Exact numbers
  47. 47. Contribution Exact numbers
  48. 48. Contribution Exact numbers 1-10
  49. 49. Contribution Exact numbers 1-10 1-100
  50. 50. Contribution Exact numbers 1-10 1-100 Fibonacci
  51. 51. Contribution Exact numbers 1-10 1-100 Fibonacci 1 to 5 stars
  52. 52. Contribution Exact numbers 1-10 1-100 Fibonacci 1 to 5 stars 0,1,2
  53. 53. Contribution Exact numbers 1-10 1-100 Fibonacci 1 to 5 stars 0,1,2
  54. 54. Feature V1 V2 E Raw C Score A 1 1 2 1 75% 0.75 B 1 0 2 0.5 90% 0.45 C 2 -1 1 1 40% 0.4
  55. 55. (V1+V2)/E = Raw Feature V1 V2 E Raw C Score A 1 1 2 1 75% 0.75 B 1 0 2 0.5 90% 0.45 C 2 -1 1 1 40% 0.4
  56. 56. Feature V1 V2 E Raw C Score A 1 1 2 1 75% 0.75 B 1 0 2 0.5 90% 0.45 C 2 -1 1 1 40% 0.4
  57. 57. (V1+V2)/E x C = Score Feature V1 V2 E Raw C Score A 1 1 2 1 75% 0.75 B 1 0 2 0.5 90% 0.45 C 2 -1 1 1 40% 0.4
  58. 58. Feature V1 V2 E Raw C Score A 1 1 2 1 75% 0.75 B 1 0 2 0.5 90% 0.45 C 2 -1 1 1 40% 0.4
  59. 59. Are We There Yet?
  60. 60. Roadmap Process 1. Set Goals 2. Collect Ideas 3. Set Priorities 4. Get Buy-in 5. Define Releases 6. Communicate Roadmap 7. Build Product 8. Launch Product 9. Repeat
  61. 61. Roadmap Process 1. Set Goals 2. Collect Ideas 3. Set Priorities w/o this, you 4. Get Buy-in are f***ed 5. Define Releases 6. Communicate Roadmap 7. Build Product 8. Launch Product 9. Repeat
  62. 62. Shuttle Diplomacy “I’ve got a draft set of priorities. Would you help me refine it?”
  63. 63. Collaboration “I’ll present our priorities to the executive team on Friday”
  64. 64. Feature V1 V2 E Raw C Score  1 1 2 1 75% 0.75 ? 1 0 2 0.5 90% 0.45  2 -1 1 1 40% 0.4
  65. 65. Use Tools (Don’t let them use you.)
  66. 66. Discussion
  67. 67. For Slides & Excel Template Bruce McCarthy Chief Product Person, Reqqs bruce@reqqs.com www.reqqs.com/resources @d8a_driven

Editor's Notes

  • I’m Bruce McCarthy, CPP of Reqqs - the smart roadmap tool for product people. I’ve been in product management for 16 years at companies like iMarket (bought by Dun & Bradstreet) and ATG (bought by Oracle). My day job currently is VP of Product at NetProspex in Waltham. \n\nI’m here to talk about how to do prioritization in an objective and collaborative way so that you can get the buy-in you need to put together a roadmap that will stick. This is the advanced class because you guys are well beyond the basics of H-M-L.\n\nI developed this methodology over time in various jobs. I’ve seen it work over and over again where gut instinct or endless meetings fail. In talking with other product people, I’ve found the good ones usually develop something similar. I’ve really just tried to standardize it and genericize it a bit so everyone can benefit.\n
  • In today’s agile world, do roadmaps still matter? Aren’t we allowed to change direction after each sprint? Actually, I think roadmaps are needed even more in an agile world. Yes, you can correct course after each sprint, but you should be correcting course toward something - toward a vision of where you want your product or your company to be in a year or 2 or 3. You need to stake out that vision and then you need to work out what you think is the best path to get there. That’s your roadmap.\n
  • Your roadmap is also a shield against the constant onslaught of potentially diverting requests from all quarters.\n
  • \n
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  • This is my favorite - actually heard - CEO quote.\n
  • Your roadmap isn’t much of a shield unless you have buy-in from your stakeholders on it. Before you can get that, though, you need priorities. To set priorities you need ideas, and you need goals to test those ideas against. I want to talk about priorities first because your roadmap is really a reflection - a timeline view - of your priorities.\n
  • Your roadmap isn’t much of a shield unless you have buy-in from your stakeholders on it. Before you can get that, though, you need priorities. To set priorities you need ideas, and you need goals to test those ideas against. I want to talk about priorities first because your roadmap is really a reflection - a timeline view - of your priorities.\n
  • \n
  • \n
  • The PM’s gut is near and dear to my heart, of course, but it can only take you so far. Sooner or later you need data. Even more, though, you need consensus from all of these stakeholders.\n
  • The PM’s gut is near and dear to my heart, of course, but it can only take you so far. Sooner or later you need data. Even more, though, you need consensus from all of these stakeholders.\n
  • The PM’s gut is near and dear to my heart, of course, but it can only take you so far. Sooner or later you need data. Even more, though, you need consensus from all of these stakeholders.\n
  • The PM’s gut is near and dear to my heart, of course, but it can only take you so far. Sooner or later you need data. Even more, though, you need consensus from all of these stakeholders.\n
  • The PM’s gut is near and dear to my heart, of course, but it can only take you so far. Sooner or later you need data. Even more, though, you need consensus from all of these stakeholders.\n
  • The PM’s gut is near and dear to my heart, of course, but it can only take you so far. Sooner or later you need data. Even more, though, you need consensus from all of these stakeholders.\n
  • The PM’s gut is near and dear to my heart, of course, but it can only take you so far. Sooner or later you need data. Even more, though, you need consensus from all of these stakeholders.\n
  • There is a better way.\n
  • A simple equation. It’s really the familiar ROI calculation. Effort is the investment you make to generate value in return. The items in your backlog that have the highest ROI are the ones you should do first, right?\n
  • Analysts and some requirements tools like to plot value vs. effort on the classic 2x2 grid. You do the things that fall in the upper right quadrant, right? That works fine when you have 5 or 10 things to prioritize, but most of us are dealing with hundreds. How do you figure out which is closest to the corner here? And don’t most of us have several projects running in parallel?\n
  • Analysts and some requirements tools like to plot value vs. effort on the classic 2x2 grid. You do the things that fall in the upper right quadrant, right? That works fine when you have 5 or 10 things to prioritize, but most of us are dealing with hundreds. How do you figure out which is closest to the corner here? And don’t most of us have several projects running in parallel?\n
  • Analysts and some requirements tools like to plot value vs. effort on the classic 2x2 grid. You do the things that fall in the upper right quadrant, right? That works fine when you have 5 or 10 things to prioritize, but most of us are dealing with hundreds. How do you figure out which is closest to the corner here? And don’t most of us have several projects running in parallel?\n
  • Analysts and some requirements tools like to plot value vs. effort on the classic 2x2 grid. You do the things that fall in the upper right quadrant, right? That works fine when you have 5 or 10 things to prioritize, but most of us are dealing with hundreds. How do you figure out which is closest to the corner here? And don’t most of us have several projects running in parallel?\n
  • Analysts and some requirements tools like to plot value vs. effort on the classic 2x2 grid. You do the things that fall in the upper right quadrant, right? That works fine when you have 5 or 10 things to prioritize, but most of us are dealing with hundreds. How do you figure out which is closest to the corner here? And don’t most of us have several projects running in parallel?\n
  • Analysts and some requirements tools like to plot value vs. effort on the classic 2x2 grid. You do the things that fall in the upper right quadrant, right? That works fine when you have 5 or 10 things to prioritize, but most of us are dealing with hundreds. How do you figure out which is closest to the corner here? And don’t most of us have several projects running in parallel?\n
  • Analysts and some requirements tools like to plot value vs. effort on the classic 2x2 grid. You do the things that fall in the upper right quadrant, right? That works fine when you have 5 or 10 things to prioritize, but most of us are dealing with hundreds. How do you figure out which is closest to the corner here? And don’t most of us have several projects running in parallel?\n
  • Analysts and some requirements tools like to plot value vs. effort on the classic 2x2 grid. You do the things that fall in the upper right quadrant, right? That works fine when you have 5 or 10 things to prioritize, but most of us are dealing with hundreds. How do you figure out which is closest to the corner here? And don’t most of us have several projects running in parallel?\n
  • Analysts and some requirements tools like to plot value vs. effort on the classic 2x2 grid. You do the things that fall in the upper right quadrant, right? That works fine when you have 5 or 10 things to prioritize, but most of us are dealing with hundreds. How do you figure out which is closest to the corner here? And don’t most of us have several projects running in parallel?\n
  • Analysts and some requirements tools like to plot value vs. effort on the classic 2x2 grid. You do the things that fall in the upper right quadrant, right? That works fine when you have 5 or 10 things to prioritize, but most of us are dealing with hundreds. How do you figure out which is closest to the corner here? And don’t most of us have several projects running in parallel?\n
  • Analysts and some requirements tools like to plot value vs. effort on the classic 2x2 grid. You do the things that fall in the upper right quadrant, right? That works fine when you have 5 or 10 things to prioritize, but most of us are dealing with hundreds. How do you figure out which is closest to the corner here? And don’t most of us have several projects running in parallel?\n
  • Analysts and some requirements tools like to plot value vs. effort on the classic 2x2 grid. You do the things that fall in the upper right quadrant, right? That works fine when you have 5 or 10 things to prioritize, but most of us are dealing with hundreds. How do you figure out which is closest to the corner here? And don’t most of us have several projects running in parallel?\n
  • Analysts and some requirements tools like to plot value vs. effort on the classic 2x2 grid. You do the things that fall in the upper right quadrant, right? That works fine when you have 5 or 10 things to prioritize, but most of us are dealing with hundreds. How do you figure out which is closest to the corner here? And don’t most of us have several projects running in parallel?\n
  • Analysts and some requirements tools like to plot value vs. effort on the classic 2x2 grid. You do the things that fall in the upper right quadrant, right? That works fine when you have 5 or 10 things to prioritize, but most of us are dealing with hundreds. How do you figure out which is closest to the corner here? And don’t most of us have several projects running in parallel?\n
  • Analysts and some requirements tools like to plot value vs. effort on the classic 2x2 grid. You do the things that fall in the upper right quadrant, right? That works fine when you have 5 or 10 things to prioritize, but most of us are dealing with hundreds. How do you figure out which is closest to the corner here? And don’t most of us have several projects running in parallel?\n
  • Analysts and some requirements tools like to plot value vs. effort on the classic 2x2 grid. You do the things that fall in the upper right quadrant, right? That works fine when you have 5 or 10 things to prioritize, but most of us are dealing with hundreds. How do you figure out which is closest to the corner here? And don’t most of us have several projects running in parallel?\n
  • Analysts and some requirements tools like to plot value vs. effort on the classic 2x2 grid. You do the things that fall in the upper right quadrant, right? That works fine when you have 5 or 10 things to prioritize, but most of us are dealing with hundreds. How do you figure out which is closest to the corner here? And don’t most of us have several projects running in parallel?\n
  • Analysts and some requirements tools like to plot value vs. effort on the classic 2x2 grid. You do the things that fall in the upper right quadrant, right? That works fine when you have 5 or 10 things to prioritize, but most of us are dealing with hundreds. How do you figure out which is closest to the corner here? And don’t most of us have several projects running in parallel?\n
  • Analysts and some requirements tools like to plot value vs. effort on the classic 2x2 grid. You do the things that fall in the upper right quadrant, right? That works fine when you have 5 or 10 things to prioritize, but most of us are dealing with hundreds. How do you figure out which is closest to the corner here? And don’t most of us have several projects running in parallel?\n
  • Analysts and some requirements tools like to plot value vs. effort on the classic 2x2 grid. You do the things that fall in the upper right quadrant, right? That works fine when you have 5 or 10 things to prioritize, but most of us are dealing with hundreds. How do you figure out which is closest to the corner here? And don’t most of us have several projects running in parallel?\n
  • Analysts and some requirements tools like to plot value vs. effort on the classic 2x2 grid. You do the things that fall in the upper right quadrant, right? That works fine when you have 5 or 10 things to prioritize, but most of us are dealing with hundreds. How do you figure out which is closest to the corner here? And don’t most of us have several projects running in parallel?\n
  • Analysts and some requirements tools like to plot value vs. effort on the classic 2x2 grid. You do the things that fall in the upper right quadrant, right? That works fine when you have 5 or 10 things to prioritize, but most of us are dealing with hundreds. How do you figure out which is closest to the corner here? And don’t most of us have several projects running in parallel?\n
  • Analysts and some requirements tools like to plot value vs. effort on the classic 2x2 grid. You do the things that fall in the upper right quadrant, right? That works fine when you have 5 or 10 things to prioritize, but most of us are dealing with hundreds. How do you figure out which is closest to the corner here? And don’t most of us have several projects running in parallel?\n
  • Analysts and some requirements tools like to plot value vs. effort on the classic 2x2 grid. You do the things that fall in the upper right quadrant, right? That works fine when you have 5 or 10 things to prioritize, but most of us are dealing with hundreds. How do you figure out which is closest to the corner here? And don’t most of us have several projects running in parallel?\n
  • Analysts and some requirements tools like to plot value vs. effort on the classic 2x2 grid. You do the things that fall in the upper right quadrant, right? That works fine when you have 5 or 10 things to prioritize, but most of us are dealing with hundreds. How do you figure out which is closest to the corner here? And don’t most of us have several projects running in parallel?\n
  • Analysts and some requirements tools like to plot value vs. effort on the classic 2x2 grid. You do the things that fall in the upper right quadrant, right? That works fine when you have 5 or 10 things to prioritize, but most of us are dealing with hundreds. How do you figure out which is closest to the corner here? And don’t most of us have several projects running in parallel?\n
  • Analysts and some requirements tools like to plot value vs. effort on the classic 2x2 grid. You do the things that fall in the upper right quadrant, right? That works fine when you have 5 or 10 things to prioritize, but most of us are dealing with hundreds. How do you figure out which is closest to the corner here? And don’t most of us have several projects running in parallel?\n
  • Analysts and some requirements tools like to plot value vs. effort on the classic 2x2 grid. You do the things that fall in the upper right quadrant, right? That works fine when you have 5 or 10 things to prioritize, but most of us are dealing with hundreds. How do you figure out which is closest to the corner here? And don’t most of us have several projects running in parallel?\n
  • Analysts and some requirements tools like to plot value vs. effort on the classic 2x2 grid. You do the things that fall in the upper right quadrant, right? That works fine when you have 5 or 10 things to prioritize, but most of us are dealing with hundreds. How do you figure out which is closest to the corner here? And don’t most of us have several projects running in parallel?\n
  • Analysts and some requirements tools like to plot value vs. effort on the classic 2x2 grid. You do the things that fall in the upper right quadrant, right? That works fine when you have 5 or 10 things to prioritize, but most of us are dealing with hundreds. How do you figure out which is closest to the corner here? And don’t most of us have several projects running in parallel?\n
  • Analysts and some requirements tools like to plot value vs. effort on the classic 2x2 grid. You do the things that fall in the upper right quadrant, right? That works fine when you have 5 or 10 things to prioritize, but most of us are dealing with hundreds. How do you figure out which is closest to the corner here? And don’t most of us have several projects running in parallel?\n
  • Analysts and some requirements tools like to plot value vs. effort on the classic 2x2 grid. You do the things that fall in the upper right quadrant, right? That works fine when you have 5 or 10 things to prioritize, but most of us are dealing with hundreds. How do you figure out which is closest to the corner here? And don’t most of us have several projects running in parallel?\n
  • Analysts and some requirements tools like to plot value vs. effort on the classic 2x2 grid. You do the things that fall in the upper right quadrant, right? That works fine when you have 5 or 10 things to prioritize, but most of us are dealing with hundreds. How do you figure out which is closest to the corner here? And don’t most of us have several projects running in parallel?\n
  • Analysts and some requirements tools like to plot value vs. effort on the classic 2x2 grid. You do the things that fall in the upper right quadrant, right? That works fine when you have 5 or 10 things to prioritize, but most of us are dealing with hundreds. How do you figure out which is closest to the corner here? And don’t most of us have several projects running in parallel?\n
  • Analysts and some requirements tools like to plot value vs. effort on the classic 2x2 grid. You do the things that fall in the upper right quadrant, right? That works fine when you have 5 or 10 things to prioritize, but most of us are dealing with hundreds. How do you figure out which is closest to the corner here? And don’t most of us have several projects running in parallel?\n
  • Analysts and some requirements tools like to plot value vs. effort on the classic 2x2 grid. You do the things that fall in the upper right quadrant, right? That works fine when you have 5 or 10 things to prioritize, but most of us are dealing with hundreds. How do you figure out which is closest to the corner here? And don’t most of us have several projects running in parallel?\n
  • Analysts and some requirements tools like to plot value vs. effort on the classic 2x2 grid. You do the things that fall in the upper right quadrant, right? That works fine when you have 5 or 10 things to prioritize, but most of us are dealing with hundreds. How do you figure out which is closest to the corner here? And don’t most of us have several projects running in parallel?\n
  • Analysts and some requirements tools like to plot value vs. effort on the classic 2x2 grid. You do the things that fall in the upper right quadrant, right? That works fine when you have 5 or 10 things to prioritize, but most of us are dealing with hundreds. How do you figure out which is closest to the corner here? And don’t most of us have several projects running in parallel?\n
  • Analysts and some requirements tools like to plot value vs. effort on the classic 2x2 grid. You do the things that fall in the upper right quadrant, right? That works fine when you have 5 or 10 things to prioritize, but most of us are dealing with hundreds. How do you figure out which is closest to the corner here? And don’t most of us have several projects running in parallel?\n
  • Analysts and some requirements tools like to plot value vs. effort on the classic 2x2 grid. You do the things that fall in the upper right quadrant, right? That works fine when you have 5 or 10 things to prioritize, but most of us are dealing with hundreds. How do you figure out which is closest to the corner here? And don’t most of us have several projects running in parallel?\n
  • Analysts and some requirements tools like to plot value vs. effort on the classic 2x2 grid. You do the things that fall in the upper right quadrant, right? That works fine when you have 5 or 10 things to prioritize, but most of us are dealing with hundreds. How do you figure out which is closest to the corner here? And don’t most of us have several projects running in parallel?\n
  • Analysts and some requirements tools like to plot value vs. effort on the classic 2x2 grid. You do the things that fall in the upper right quadrant, right? That works fine when you have 5 or 10 things to prioritize, but most of us are dealing with hundreds. How do you figure out which is closest to the corner here? And don’t most of us have several projects running in parallel?\n
  • Analysts and some requirements tools like to plot value vs. effort on the classic 2x2 grid. You do the things that fall in the upper right quadrant, right? That works fine when you have 5 or 10 things to prioritize, but most of us are dealing with hundreds. How do you figure out which is closest to the corner here? And don’t most of us have several projects running in parallel?\n
  • Analysts and some requirements tools like to plot value vs. effort on the classic 2x2 grid. You do the things that fall in the upper right quadrant, right? That works fine when you have 5 or 10 things to prioritize, but most of us are dealing with hundreds. How do you figure out which is closest to the corner here? And don’t most of us have several projects running in parallel?\n
  • Analysts and some requirements tools like to plot value vs. effort on the classic 2x2 grid. You do the things that fall in the upper right quadrant, right? That works fine when you have 5 or 10 things to prioritize, but most of us are dealing with hundreds. How do you figure out which is closest to the corner here? And don’t most of us have several projects running in parallel?\n
  • Analysts and some requirements tools like to plot value vs. effort on the classic 2x2 grid. You do the things that fall in the upper right quadrant, right? That works fine when you have 5 or 10 things to prioritize, but most of us are dealing with hundreds. How do you figure out which is closest to the corner here? And don’t most of us have several projects running in parallel?\n
  • Analysts and some requirements tools like to plot value vs. effort on the classic 2x2 grid. You do the things that fall in the upper right quadrant, right? That works fine when you have 5 or 10 things to prioritize, but most of us are dealing with hundreds. How do you figure out which is closest to the corner here? And don’t most of us have several projects running in parallel?\n
  • Analysts and some requirements tools like to plot value vs. effort on the classic 2x2 grid. You do the things that fall in the upper right quadrant, right? That works fine when you have 5 or 10 things to prioritize, but most of us are dealing with hundreds. How do you figure out which is closest to the corner here? And don’t most of us have several projects running in parallel?\n
  • Analysts and some requirements tools like to plot value vs. effort on the classic 2x2 grid. You do the things that fall in the upper right quadrant, right? That works fine when you have 5 or 10 things to prioritize, but most of us are dealing with hundreds. How do you figure out which is closest to the corner here? And don’t most of us have several projects running in parallel?\n
  • Analysts and some requirements tools like to plot value vs. effort on the classic 2x2 grid. You do the things that fall in the upper right quadrant, right? That works fine when you have 5 or 10 things to prioritize, but most of us are dealing with hundreds. How do you figure out which is closest to the corner here? And don’t most of us have several projects running in parallel?\n
  • Analysts and some requirements tools like to plot value vs. effort on the classic 2x2 grid. You do the things that fall in the upper right quadrant, right? That works fine when you have 5 or 10 things to prioritize, but most of us are dealing with hundreds. How do you figure out which is closest to the corner here? And don’t most of us have several projects running in parallel?\n
  • Analysts and some requirements tools like to plot value vs. effort on the classic 2x2 grid. You do the things that fall in the upper right quadrant, right? That works fine when you have 5 or 10 things to prioritize, but most of us are dealing with hundreds. How do you figure out which is closest to the corner here? And don’t most of us have several projects running in parallel?\n
  • Analysts and some requirements tools like to plot value vs. effort on the classic 2x2 grid. You do the things that fall in the upper right quadrant, right? That works fine when you have 5 or 10 things to prioritize, but most of us are dealing with hundreds. How do you figure out which is closest to the corner here? And don’t most of us have several projects running in parallel?\n
  • Analysts and some requirements tools like to plot value vs. effort on the classic 2x2 grid. You do the things that fall in the upper right quadrant, right? That works fine when you have 5 or 10 things to prioritize, but most of us are dealing with hundreds. How do you figure out which is closest to the corner here? And don’t most of us have several projects running in parallel?\n
  • Analysts and some requirements tools like to plot value vs. effort on the classic 2x2 grid. You do the things that fall in the upper right quadrant, right? That works fine when you have 5 or 10 things to prioritize, but most of us are dealing with hundreds. How do you figure out which is closest to the corner here? And don’t most of us have several projects running in parallel?\n
  • Analysts and some requirements tools like to plot value vs. effort on the classic 2x2 grid. You do the things that fall in the upper right quadrant, right? That works fine when you have 5 or 10 things to prioritize, but most of us are dealing with hundreds. How do you figure out which is closest to the corner here? And don’t most of us have several projects running in parallel?\n
  • Analysts and some requirements tools like to plot value vs. effort on the classic 2x2 grid. You do the things that fall in the upper right quadrant, right? That works fine when you have 5 or 10 things to prioritize, but most of us are dealing with hundreds. How do you figure out which is closest to the corner here? And don’t most of us have several projects running in parallel?\n
  • Analysts and some requirements tools like to plot value vs. effort on the classic 2x2 grid. You do the things that fall in the upper right quadrant, right? That works fine when you have 5 or 10 things to prioritize, but most of us are dealing with hundreds. How do you figure out which is closest to the corner here? And don’t most of us have several projects running in parallel?\n
  • Analysts and some requirements tools like to plot value vs. effort on the classic 2x2 grid. You do the things that fall in the upper right quadrant, right? That works fine when you have 5 or 10 things to prioritize, but most of us are dealing with hundreds. How do you figure out which is closest to the corner here? And don’t most of us have several projects running in parallel?\n
  • Analysts and some requirements tools like to plot value vs. effort on the classic 2x2 grid. You do the things that fall in the upper right quadrant, right? That works fine when you have 5 or 10 things to prioritize, but most of us are dealing with hundreds. How do you figure out which is closest to the corner here? And don’t most of us have several projects running in parallel?\n
  • Analysts and some requirements tools like to plot value vs. effort on the classic 2x2 grid. You do the things that fall in the upper right quadrant, right? That works fine when you have 5 or 10 things to prioritize, but most of us are dealing with hundreds. How do you figure out which is closest to the corner here? And don’t most of us have several projects running in parallel?\n
  • Analysts and some requirements tools like to plot value vs. effort on the classic 2x2 grid. You do the things that fall in the upper right quadrant, right? That works fine when you have 5 or 10 things to prioritize, but most of us are dealing with hundreds. How do you figure out which is closest to the corner here? And don’t most of us have several projects running in parallel?\n
  • Analysts and some requirements tools like to plot value vs. effort on the classic 2x2 grid. You do the things that fall in the upper right quadrant, right? That works fine when you have 5 or 10 things to prioritize, but most of us are dealing with hundreds. How do you figure out which is closest to the corner here? And don’t most of us have several projects running in parallel?\n
  • Analysts and some requirements tools like to plot value vs. effort on the classic 2x2 grid. You do the things that fall in the upper right quadrant, right? That works fine when you have 5 or 10 things to prioritize, but most of us are dealing with hundreds. How do you figure out which is closest to the corner here? And don’t most of us have several projects running in parallel?\n
  • Analysts and some requirements tools like to plot value vs. effort on the classic 2x2 grid. You do the things that fall in the upper right quadrant, right? That works fine when you have 5 or 10 things to prioritize, but most of us are dealing with hundreds. How do you figure out which is closest to the corner here? And don’t most of us have several projects running in parallel?\n
  • Analysts and some requirements tools like to plot value vs. effort on the classic 2x2 grid. You do the things that fall in the upper right quadrant, right? That works fine when you have 5 or 10 things to prioritize, but most of us are dealing with hundreds. How do you figure out which is closest to the corner here? And don’t most of us have several projects running in parallel?\n
  • Analysts and some requirements tools like to plot value vs. effort on the classic 2x2 grid. You do the things that fall in the upper right quadrant, right? That works fine when you have 5 or 10 things to prioritize, but most of us are dealing with hundreds. How do you figure out which is closest to the corner here? And don’t most of us have several projects running in parallel?\n
  • Analysts and some requirements tools like to plot value vs. effort on the classic 2x2 grid. You do the things that fall in the upper right quadrant, right? That works fine when you have 5 or 10 things to prioritize, but most of us are dealing with hundreds. How do you figure out which is closest to the corner here? And don’t most of us have several projects running in parallel?\n
  • Analysts and some requirements tools like to plot value vs. effort on the classic 2x2 grid. You do the things that fall in the upper right quadrant, right? That works fine when you have 5 or 10 things to prioritize, but most of us are dealing with hundreds. How do you figure out which is closest to the corner here? And don’t most of us have several projects running in parallel?\n
  • Analysts and some requirements tools like to plot value vs. effort on the classic 2x2 grid. You do the things that fall in the upper right quadrant, right? That works fine when you have 5 or 10 things to prioritize, but most of us are dealing with hundreds. How do you figure out which is closest to the corner here? And don’t most of us have several projects running in parallel?\n
  • Analysts and some requirements tools like to plot value vs. effort on the classic 2x2 grid. You do the things that fall in the upper right quadrant, right? That works fine when you have 5 or 10 things to prioritize, but most of us are dealing with hundreds. How do you figure out which is closest to the corner here? And don’t most of us have several projects running in parallel?\n
  • Analysts and some requirements tools like to plot value vs. effort on the classic 2x2 grid. You do the things that fall in the upper right quadrant, right? That works fine when you have 5 or 10 things to prioritize, but most of us are dealing with hundreds. How do you figure out which is closest to the corner here? And don’t most of us have several projects running in parallel?\n
  • Analysts and some requirements tools like to plot value vs. effort on the classic 2x2 grid. You do the things that fall in the upper right quadrant, right? That works fine when you have 5 or 10 things to prioritize, but most of us are dealing with hundreds. How do you figure out which is closest to the corner here? And don’t most of us have several projects running in parallel?\n
  • Analysts and some requirements tools like to plot value vs. effort on the classic 2x2 grid. You do the things that fall in the upper right quadrant, right? That works fine when you have 5 or 10 things to prioritize, but most of us are dealing with hundreds. How do you figure out which is closest to the corner here? And don’t most of us have several projects running in parallel?\n
  • Analysts and some requirements tools like to plot value vs. effort on the classic 2x2 grid. You do the things that fall in the upper right quadrant, right? That works fine when you have 5 or 10 things to prioritize, but most of us are dealing with hundreds. How do you figure out which is closest to the corner here? And don’t most of us have several projects running in parallel?\n
  • Analysts and some requirements tools like to plot value vs. effort on the classic 2x2 grid. You do the things that fall in the upper right quadrant, right? That works fine when you have 5 or 10 things to prioritize, but most of us are dealing with hundreds. How do you figure out which is closest to the corner here? And don’t most of us have several projects running in parallel?\n
  • Analysts and some requirements tools like to plot value vs. effort on the classic 2x2 grid. You do the things that fall in the upper right quadrant, right? That works fine when you have 5 or 10 things to prioritize, but most of us are dealing with hundreds. How do you figure out which is closest to the corner here? And don’t most of us have several projects running in parallel?\n
  • Analysts and some requirements tools like to plot value vs. effort on the classic 2x2 grid. You do the things that fall in the upper right quadrant, right? That works fine when you have 5 or 10 things to prioritize, but most of us are dealing with hundreds. How do you figure out which is closest to the corner here? And don’t most of us have several projects running in parallel?\n
  • Analysts and some requirements tools like to plot value vs. effort on the classic 2x2 grid. You do the things that fall in the upper right quadrant, right? That works fine when you have 5 or 10 things to prioritize, but most of us are dealing with hundreds. How do you figure out which is closest to the corner here? And don’t most of us have several projects running in parallel?\n
  • Analysts and some requirements tools like to plot value vs. effort on the classic 2x2 grid. You do the things that fall in the upper right quadrant, right? That works fine when you have 5 or 10 things to prioritize, but most of us are dealing with hundreds. How do you figure out which is closest to the corner here? And don’t most of us have several projects running in parallel?\n
  • Analysts and some requirements tools like to plot value vs. effort on the classic 2x2 grid. You do the things that fall in the upper right quadrant, right? That works fine when you have 5 or 10 things to prioritize, but most of us are dealing with hundreds. How do you figure out which is closest to the corner here? And don’t most of us have several projects running in parallel?\n
  • Analysts and some requirements tools like to plot value vs. effort on the classic 2x2 grid. You do the things that fall in the upper right quadrant, right? That works fine when you have 5 or 10 things to prioritize, but most of us are dealing with hundreds. How do you figure out which is closest to the corner here? And don’t most of us have several projects running in parallel?\n
  • Analysts and some requirements tools like to plot value vs. effort on the classic 2x2 grid. You do the things that fall in the upper right quadrant, right? That works fine when you have 5 or 10 things to prioritize, but most of us are dealing with hundreds. How do you figure out which is closest to the corner here? And don’t most of us have several projects running in parallel?\n
  • Analysts and some requirements tools like to plot value vs. effort on the classic 2x2 grid. You do the things that fall in the upper right quadrant, right? That works fine when you have 5 or 10 things to prioritize, but most of us are dealing with hundreds. How do you figure out which is closest to the corner here? And don’t most of us have several projects running in parallel?\n
  • Analysts and some requirements tools like to plot value vs. effort on the classic 2x2 grid. You do the things that fall in the upper right quadrant, right? That works fine when you have 5 or 10 things to prioritize, but most of us are dealing with hundreds. How do you figure out which is closest to the corner here? And don’t most of us have several projects running in parallel?\n
  • Analysts and some requirements tools like to plot value vs. effort on the classic 2x2 grid. You do the things that fall in the upper right quadrant, right? That works fine when you have 5 or 10 things to prioritize, but most of us are dealing with hundreds. How do you figure out which is closest to the corner here? And don’t most of us have several projects running in parallel?\n
  • Analysts and some requirements tools like to plot value vs. effort on the classic 2x2 grid. You do the things that fall in the upper right quadrant, right? That works fine when you have 5 or 10 things to prioritize, but most of us are dealing with hundreds. How do you figure out which is closest to the corner here? And don’t most of us have several projects running in parallel?\n
  • Analysts and some requirements tools like to plot value vs. effort on the classic 2x2 grid. You do the things that fall in the upper right quadrant, right? That works fine when you have 5 or 10 things to prioritize, but most of us are dealing with hundreds. How do you figure out which is closest to the corner here? And don’t most of us have several projects running in parallel?\n
  • Analysts and some requirements tools like to plot value vs. effort on the classic 2x2 grid. You do the things that fall in the upper right quadrant, right? That works fine when you have 5 or 10 things to prioritize, but most of us are dealing with hundreds. How do you figure out which is closest to the corner here? And don’t most of us have several projects running in parallel?\n
  • Analysts and some requirements tools like to plot value vs. effort on the classic 2x2 grid. You do the things that fall in the upper right quadrant, right? That works fine when you have 5 or 10 things to prioritize, but most of us are dealing with hundreds. How do you figure out which is closest to the corner here? And don’t most of us have several projects running in parallel?\n
  • Analysts and some requirements tools like to plot value vs. effort on the classic 2x2 grid. You do the things that fall in the upper right quadrant, right? That works fine when you have 5 or 10 things to prioritize, but most of us are dealing with hundreds. How do you figure out which is closest to the corner here? And don’t most of us have several projects running in parallel?\n
  • Analysts and some requirements tools like to plot value vs. effort on the classic 2x2 grid. You do the things that fall in the upper right quadrant, right? That works fine when you have 5 or 10 things to prioritize, but most of us are dealing with hundreds. How do you figure out which is closest to the corner here? And don’t most of us have several projects running in parallel?\n
  • Analysts and some requirements tools like to plot value vs. effort on the classic 2x2 grid. You do the things that fall in the upper right quadrant, right? That works fine when you have 5 or 10 things to prioritize, but most of us are dealing with hundreds. How do you figure out which is closest to the corner here? And don’t most of us have several projects running in parallel?\n
  • Analysts and some requirements tools like to plot value vs. effort on the classic 2x2 grid. You do the things that fall in the upper right quadrant, right? That works fine when you have 5 or 10 things to prioritize, but most of us are dealing with hundreds. How do you figure out which is closest to the corner here? And don’t most of us have several projects running in parallel?\n
  • Analysts and some requirements tools like to plot value vs. effort on the classic 2x2 grid. You do the things that fall in the upper right quadrant, right? That works fine when you have 5 or 10 things to prioritize, but most of us are dealing with hundreds. How do you figure out which is closest to the corner here? And don’t most of us have several projects running in parallel?\n
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  • Your goals usually come down from your CEO or your executive team. Strategic goals help you prioritize projects. More tactical goals are what gets your project approved. Revenue is nearly always on the list. \n\nA tip for when your CEO asks what you are doing that’s “transformative” or “paradigm-shifting” is to think of it as things that won’t generate significant revenue this year but have a chance to grow it a lot in future years by entering new markets or serving new needs.\n\nI’ve never been able to get away without including some kind of “coolness” or “buzz factor” goal for anything but internal projects. If you skip that, someone always complains that we’re not taking into account that we need to generate excitement in the market to be successful.\n
  • Your goals usually come down from your CEO or your executive team. Strategic goals help you prioritize projects. More tactical goals are what gets your project approved. Revenue is nearly always on the list. \n\nA tip for when your CEO asks what you are doing that’s “transformative” or “paradigm-shifting” is to think of it as things that won’t generate significant revenue this year but have a chance to grow it a lot in future years by entering new markets or serving new needs.\n\nI’ve never been able to get away without including some kind of “coolness” or “buzz factor” goal for anything but internal projects. If you skip that, someone always complains that we’re not taking into account that we need to generate excitement in the market to be successful.\n
  • Your goals usually come down from your CEO or your executive team. Strategic goals help you prioritize projects. More tactical goals are what gets your project approved. Revenue is nearly always on the list. \n\nA tip for when your CEO asks what you are doing that’s “transformative” or “paradigm-shifting” is to think of it as things that won’t generate significant revenue this year but have a chance to grow it a lot in future years by entering new markets or serving new needs.\n\nI’ve never been able to get away without including some kind of “coolness” or “buzz factor” goal for anything but internal projects. If you skip that, someone always complains that we’re not taking into account that we need to generate excitement in the market to be successful.\n
  • Your goals usually come down from your CEO or your executive team. Strategic goals help you prioritize projects. More tactical goals are what gets your project approved. Revenue is nearly always on the list. \n\nA tip for when your CEO asks what you are doing that’s “transformative” or “paradigm-shifting” is to think of it as things that won’t generate significant revenue this year but have a chance to grow it a lot in future years by entering new markets or serving new needs.\n\nI’ve never been able to get away without including some kind of “coolness” or “buzz factor” goal for anything but internal projects. If you skip that, someone always complains that we’re not taking into account that we need to generate excitement in the market to be successful.\n
  • Your goals usually come down from your CEO or your executive team. Strategic goals help you prioritize projects. More tactical goals are what gets your project approved. Revenue is nearly always on the list. \n\nA tip for when your CEO asks what you are doing that’s “transformative” or “paradigm-shifting” is to think of it as things that won’t generate significant revenue this year but have a chance to grow it a lot in future years by entering new markets or serving new needs.\n\nI’ve never been able to get away without including some kind of “coolness” or “buzz factor” goal for anything but internal projects. If you skip that, someone always complains that we’re not taking into account that we need to generate excitement in the market to be successful.\n
  • Your goals usually come down from your CEO or your executive team. Strategic goals help you prioritize projects. More tactical goals are what gets your project approved. Revenue is nearly always on the list. \n\nA tip for when your CEO asks what you are doing that’s “transformative” or “paradigm-shifting” is to think of it as things that won’t generate significant revenue this year but have a chance to grow it a lot in future years by entering new markets or serving new needs.\n\nI’ve never been able to get away without including some kind of “coolness” or “buzz factor” goal for anything but internal projects. If you skip that, someone always complains that we’re not taking into account that we need to generate excitement in the market to be successful.\n
  • Your goals usually come down from your CEO or your executive team. Strategic goals help you prioritize projects. More tactical goals are what gets your project approved. Revenue is nearly always on the list. \n\nA tip for when your CEO asks what you are doing that’s “transformative” or “paradigm-shifting” is to think of it as things that won’t generate significant revenue this year but have a chance to grow it a lot in future years by entering new markets or serving new needs.\n\nI’ve never been able to get away without including some kind of “coolness” or “buzz factor” goal for anything but internal projects. If you skip that, someone always complains that we’re not taking into account that we need to generate excitement in the market to be successful.\n
  • Your goals usually come down from your CEO or your executive team. Strategic goals help you prioritize projects. More tactical goals are what gets your project approved. Revenue is nearly always on the list. \n\nA tip for when your CEO asks what you are doing that’s “transformative” or “paradigm-shifting” is to think of it as things that won’t generate significant revenue this year but have a chance to grow it a lot in future years by entering new markets or serving new needs.\n\nI’ve never been able to get away without including some kind of “coolness” or “buzz factor” goal for anything but internal projects. If you skip that, someone always complains that we’re not taking into account that we need to generate excitement in the market to be successful.\n
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  • Removing the QA step to ship early means negative numbers for quality (V2)\n
  • Removing the QA step to ship early means negative numbers for quality (V2)\n
  • Removing the QA step to ship early means negative numbers for quality (V2)\n
  • Removing the QA step to ship early means negative numbers for quality (V2)\n
  • No. Maybe halfway.\n
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  • Henry Kissinger was Nixon’s Secretary of State and famously settled things down in the Middle East after the 1967 war using shuttle diplomacy.\n
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  • A long-time PM of a company I had just joined saw the way this methodology drove consensus among his executive team as “magical.”\n
  • A PM I met recently told me he had a friend who developed a spreadsheet like this but could not get buy-in on it. Turns out he made two critical mistakes. First, he had about 20 different goals he scored everything against and so couldn’t get anyone to review it with him. Second, he insisted the team adopt the spreadsheet’s recommendations exactly without further discussion.\n
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