Inaccuracies, Mistakes and Identity Theft
Property Records
Data entry errors may occur; it’s possible
the reporting organization has incorrectly
entered information...
Motor Vehicle


If you do not recognize a registered vehicle or find
errors in your registration information, contact the...
Driver’s License






If you believe someone has acquired a drivers
license or state-issued identification card in
you...
Professional Licenses


If you believe your name or Social
Security number may have been used to
obtain a state issued li...
Concealed Weapons
Permits
If you notice information on your permit
records that is inaccurate, you should
contact the issu...
Voter Registration
Coverage






If you find a voter registration record in a state
where you have never registered to...
Court Records –
Bankruptcies
This information is gathered from county
and state court databases, and may not be
available ...
Disputing Bankruptcies










If you believe someone has wrongly filed for bankruptcy
under your name:
1. Obtain a...
Criminal/ Civil Court
Records


The process to correct records within criminal
justice databases could vary from state to...
The arresting police department should compare the
prints and photographs with those of the imposter to
establish your inn...








Contact your state DMV. Find out if your drivers license is
being used by the imposter. Ask that your files be...
Court Records




If you notice inaccuracies on your court
records, you should contact the court reporting
the record (c...
Personal Information






Your identification information: Name, Date of
Birth, Social Security number and any aliases...
Other Names Associated with
SSN


This includes other names found in public records that
have been associated with your S...
Address Information


Address information is derived from various sources
such as public utilities and government records...
Incorrect Dates








This information provides a timeline for which a
public record could have you listed at a spe...
Inaccurate Address








Mistakes do happen; it is possible that the reporting
organization mis-keyed your address w...
Unfamiliar Address








If there are other public records listed in your profile using
that address, you may want t...
Unlisted Phone Number




Your Public Record Profile is compiled from
hundreds of public databases, including utility
co...
Is it IDT or an Error?
Before hitting the ‘Identity Theft’ panic
button, look into where the information
came from and you...
Police Reports







Obtain any documentation regarding the
fraudulent account including address, public
records. ht...
Fraud Alerts









Order and review all three national credit reports for
possible identity theft.
https://www.an...
90 Day Fraud Alert
Allows a new credit report every 90 days. This is
calendar days, so the start of the following month.
...
7 Year Fraud Alert







These include the same basics of the 90
day alert.
Good/active contact number are important...
Security Freeze
This is pretty much a ‘lock down’ of your credit.
 Does not mean credit can not be opened, some
creditors...
TransUnion


Security Freeze:
http://www.transunion.com/personal-credit/creditdisputes/credit-freezes.page



How to Rea...
Equifax


Security Freeze:
https://help.equifax.com/app/answers/detail/a_id/1
59



How to read a credit report:
http://...
Experian


Security Freeze:
https://www.experian.com/freeze/center.html



How to read a credit report:
http://www.exper...
Last but not least









Use common sense when adding a Fraud Alert or
Freeze to your credit files because of inac...
Compiled and designed by Mark Fullbright , Certified Identity Theft Risk
Management Specialist™ (CITRMS) as a free service...
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Correcting your Public Records

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Compiled and designed by Mark Fullbright , Certified Identity Theft Risk Management Specialist™ (CITRMS) as a free service for consumers to protect themselves online and reduce their exposure to identity theft * Stay Safe, Stay Secure *

*Company names mentioned herein are the property of, and may be trademarks of, their respective owners and are for educational purposes only.

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Correcting your Public Records

  1. 1. Inaccuracies, Mistakes and Identity Theft
  2. 2. Property Records Data entry errors may occur; it’s possible the reporting organization has incorrectly entered information to your files.  If there are other public records or accounts listed in your Public Record Profile using an unfamiliar property address, you may want to investigate further to rule out possible fraud.  Keep in mind, most data errors are just that. Errors. 
  3. 3. Motor Vehicle  If you do not recognize a registered vehicle or find errors in your registration information, contact the agency that issued the registration to investigate or correct the registration. To find the Department of Motor Vehicles for your state, visit www.dmv.org.
  4. 4. Driver’s License    If you believe someone has acquired a drivers license or state-issued identification card in your name, contact the Department of Motor Vehicles in the reporting state to further investigate. To find the DMV for your state, visit www.dmv.org. If your state typically uses your Social Security number as your drivers license number, insist they substitute another number. If there are drivers license records shown that are incorrect or unfamiliar, contact the DMV that issued the license to research and correct the item.
  5. 5. Professional Licenses  If you believe your name or Social Security number may have been used to obtain a state issued license illegally, contact the State Licensing Department in the state where the license was issued.
  6. 6. Concealed Weapons Permits If you notice information on your permit records that is inaccurate, you should contact the issuing county or state and work with them to ensure that they have the correct information on file.  If there is a permit record that does not belong to you on your report, you should contact the issuing county or state to research and correct the item or have it removed. 
  7. 7. Voter Registration Coverage    If you find a voter registration record in a state where you have never registered to vote, you should contact the voter registration board in the state reporting the record and notify them of the fraudulent or erroneous records. To register to vote or to verify the accuracy of your voter registration, contact your local voter registration office, which can often be found online by searching for your state’s board of elections. For more information about voter registration, visit the Election Assistance Commission’s Web site at www.eac.gov.
  8. 8. Court Records – Bankruptcies This information is gathered from county and state court databases, and may not be available for reporting by all states.  You may find additional court records that do not appear currently in your Public Record Profile.  In addition, existing court information and bankruptcies may appear on future reports as more agencies make this information accessible. 
  9. 9. Disputing Bankruptcies      If you believe someone has wrongly filed for bankruptcy under your name: 1. Obtain a copy of the bankruptcy documents. Contact the bankruptcy clerk of the court named in the bankruptcy record and request documents be sent to you, if possible. 2. Write a letter to the U.S. Trustee. You may need to send a letter in writing to the U.S. Trustee (UST) in the region where the bankruptcy was filed to describe the situation and provide proof of your identity. To locate the UST, visit www.usdoj.gov/ust. 3. File a complaint with law enforcement in the city where the bankruptcy was filed. You may need to go through your local police. 4. Get legal help. The UST does not provide legal representation, legal advice or referrals to lawyers.
  10. 10. Criminal/ Civil Court Records  The process to correct records within criminal justice databases could vary from state to county.  Contact the arresting or citing law enforcement agency. The law enforcement department that originally arrested the person using your identity or the court agency that issued the warrant for the arrest, to explain your situation. File an Identity Theft Report to confirm your identity. The police department may collect a full set of your fingerprints, your photograph and copies of photo identification such as your drivers license, passport or visa. Be prepared to provide the required documentation. 
  11. 11. The arresting police department should compare the prints and photographs with those of the imposter to establish your innocence. If the arrest warrant is from a state or county other than where you live, ask your local police department to send the identity theft report to the police department in the jurisdiction where the arrest warrant, traffic citation or criminal conviction originated.  Obtain a clearance letter. The law enforcement agency should then recall any warrants and issue a clearance letter or certificate of release (if you were arrested/booked). You'll need to keep this document with you at all times in case you're questioned by police.  Request the law enforcement agency to file a record of the investigation establishing your innocence with the district attorney's office and/or court where the crime took place, which should result in an amended complaint. 
  12. 12.     Contact your state DMV. Find out if your drivers license is being used by the imposter. Ask that your files be flagged for possible identity theft. You may need to hire an attorney to help you clear your name. Contact legal services in your state or your local bar association for help finding an attorney. Unfortunately, once your name is recorded in a criminal database, it's unlikely that it will be completely removed from the official record. Ask that the key name, or primary name, be changed from your name to the imposter's name (or to John Doe if the imposter's true identity is not known), with your name noted only as an alias. If your state has no formal procedure for clearing your record, contact the district attorney’s office in the county where the case was originally prosecuted to ask for the appropriate court records needed to clear your name.
  13. 13. Court Records   If you notice inaccuracies on your court records, you should contact the court reporting the record (county recorder) and work with them to update and correct the information. However, courts may not update old records or report updated information, depending on state law. If there are records listed in your Public Record Profile that are incorrect or unfamiliar, contact the agency shown to research and correct the item. You made need to make the request in writing.
  14. 14. Personal Information    Your identification information: Name, Date of Birth, Social Security number and any aliases associated with your identity. Aliases may appear if you use a nickname, selectively use your middle name or initial, legally change your name or if your name was accidentally misspelled in a public record. Listed names are collected from many different sources, including, utility companies; phone companies; court, city, county, state and federal records, creditors and credit reporting agencies.
  15. 15. Other Names Associated with SSN  This includes other names found in public records that have been associated with your Social Security number (SSN). These typically occur as the result of:  Clerical errors caused by data entry personnel mistyping the last digit of a SSN or name spelling into a public record.  Clerical errors in information sent to the credit reporting agencies  If you have another name associated with your SSN, you should:  Check the public records for unknown addresses, properties or other records  Check your credit files from each of 3 credit reporting agencies for accounts you do not recognize
  16. 16. Address Information  Address information is derived from various sources such as public utilities and government records.  Your verified address represents your current address(es) as indicated in these public records.  Multiple addresses occur for various reasons, such as: · You have more than one residence. · You use a different billing address. · You are a co-signor for a family member at a different address.
  17. 17. Incorrect Dates      This information provides a timeline for which a public record could have you listed at a specific address. These dates are not meant to represent specific relocation dates. If you move and do not update or obtain a new drivers license or change your voter registration to your new address, your address history may not reflect your move. Inaccurate dates should not cause concern if the address itself is one where you previously lived. Companies are not likely to update archived records to correct dates of residence or typographical errors.
  18. 18. Inaccurate Address     Mistakes do happen; it is possible that the reporting organization mis-keyed your address when entering it into their system. If the address is valid, but contains a typographical error and is not a current address, there is no need to correct the error. Companies are unlikely to update and re-report address information for accounts that are no longer active. If your current address contains errors, you may want to contact companies that you have accounts with to ensure that they have the correct address on file for your account to ensure that billing statements and other information are delivered to the correct address.
  19. 19. Unfamiliar Address     If there are other public records listed in your profile using that address, you may want to investigate further to rule out possible fraud. If you suspect mail theft, contact the U.S. Postal Inspection Service; visit https://postalinspectors.uspis.gov/ to file a report. Address records are collected from many different sources, including, but not limited to:  Utility Companies, Phone Companies, Court, County, State and Federal Records, Creditors and Credit Reporting Agencies Once an address has been reported and becomes part of your public records, it’s almost impossible to locate agency who reported the address. If you find an unfamiliar address that is more than just a data entry or typographical error, you should examine your profile for any records that do not belong to you.
  20. 20. Unlisted Phone Number   Your Public Record Profile is compiled from hundreds of public databases, including utility companies and other public resources. If your phone number is listed on any public record or utility company file, it is most likely listed on public records, even if your phone number is unlisted.
  21. 21. Is it IDT or an Error? Before hitting the ‘Identity Theft’ panic button, look into where the information came from and you’ll see many companies touch your information. Errors are not Identity Theft.  A good rule to determine if the error could be identity theft is if it’s linked to utilities, credit accounts or mailings.  Also if the error is corrected and it reappears. This could indicate someone is using parts of your identity and submitting applications for credit or utilities. 
  22. 22. Police Reports      Obtain any documentation regarding the fraudulent account including address, public records. http://www.consumer.ftc.gov/articles/pdf0090-fcra-609e.pdf Provide names and numbers of agencies, utility companies contacted. Write a brief synopsis listing a time line of facts of the crime. http://www.consumer.ftc.gov/articles/pdf-0094identity-theft-affidavit.pdf Notify your local police department and file a complaint. Provide copies of all documents.
  23. 23. Fraud Alerts       Order and review all three national credit reports for possible identity theft. https://www.annualcreditreport.com/index.action Look in the public records section of your credit report for inaccuracies or fraudulent names and addresses. If you locate fraud you have an option to place either a 90 day, 7 year or Security Freeze on your credit files. Understand how the Alerts and Freeze works and how they will impact your ability to obtain credit. Placing an alert will also opt you out of preapproved credit offers. Requesting a fraud alert from either credit bureau will automatically place on the other two.
  24. 24. 90 Day Fraud Alert Allows a new credit report every 90 days. This is calendar days, so the start of the following month.  Per the Fair and Accurate Credit Transactions Act these are free.  Add good contact number(s) example; Cell & Home.  It’s suggested merchants ask for addition information before extending credit. Most have a process in place for ‘out of pocket’ questions for verification. It’s also an option, so they may skip it.  If a creditor calls, they need to speak to you directly, not your spouse or friend. 
  25. 25. 7 Year Fraud Alert      These include the same basics of the 90 day alert. Good/active contact number are important and your responsibly to keep the bureaus updated if they change. Keep in mind, 7 years is a long time to have this alert in place. Is it necessary? Requires a police report that lists identity theft as the crime. You can request 2 free credit reports per year while the 7 year alert is in place.
  26. 26. Security Freeze This is pretty much a ‘lock down’ of your credit.  Does not mean credit can not be opened, some creditors use alternate credit reporting companies.  If you are a victim of identity theft related fraud, these are free. If not, there could be a fee depending on the state you live in.  You will have a code and special number to call to ‘lift’ the freeze to allow creditors access.  You can determine the amount of time this lift is in active, 2 days, 7 days, 25 days etc.  Each credit bureau has it’s own guidelines. Understand them before activating the freeze. 
  27. 27. TransUnion  Security Freeze: http://www.transunion.com/personal-credit/creditdisputes/credit-freezes.page  How to Read a credit report: http://www.transunion.com/docs/business/HowToR eadCreditReport.pdf  Fraud Alert:http://www.transunion.com/personalcredit/credit-disputes/fraud-alerts.page
  28. 28. Equifax  Security Freeze: https://help.equifax.com/app/answers/detail/a_id/1 59  How to read a credit report: http://www.uwsv.org/sites/uwsv.org/files/Sample% 20Credit%20Report-Equifax.pdf  Fraud Alert: http://www.equifax.com/answers/setfraud-alerts/en_cp
  29. 29. Experian  Security Freeze: https://www.experian.com/freeze/center.html  How to read a credit report: http://www.experian.com/credit_report_basics/pdf/ samplecreditreport.pdf  Fraud Alert: https://www.experian.com/fraud/center.html
  30. 30. Last but not least      Use common sense when adding a Fraud Alert or Freeze to your credit files because of inaccuracies found on public records. Request the agency responsible to fix the error. There are Specialty Credit Reports for many types of credit (mortgage, utilities, loans etc.) You may need to contact them in a similar manner. Don’t panic! If you are a victim of identity theft, numerous federal and state laws are available to you. Remember, you are not responsible for fraudulent accounts set up with your Personally Identifiable Information.
  31. 31. Compiled and designed by Mark Fullbright , Certified Identity Theft Risk Management Specialist™ (CITRMS) as a free service for consumers to reduce their exposure to identity theft. Stay Safe, Stay Secure

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