Session 3 ppt 2012

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  • Session 3 ppt 2012

    1. 1. Overview of Reading Principles TEACHING FOR RESULTS SESSION THREE
    2. 2. Objectives: DEFINE reading principles unique to the secondary grade levels as a prerequisite for effectively assessing and developing these principles in students. EXAMINE and articulate the purpose of the inquiry process and internalize the steps in the process to begin implementation with students. EXAMINE, administer, and score reading assessments to diagnose student reading proficiency skills. REFINE skill in using Strong Voice through practice and targeted feedback.
    3. 3. Agenda: 5:00- 5:15 Opening  Defining the Reading Principles Through the Lens of Struggling Readers 5:15-6:25 Section 1  Introduction to the Inquiry Process 6:25-6:40 MIY Protocol  Strong Voice 6:40-7:45 Section 2  How Do Diagnose Reading Achievement Levels? 7:45-8:00- Closing  Reflection and Next Steps
    4. 4. Opening: Take out Handouts 3.1 and 3.2 (pgs 96-98). We will be reviewing the need for adolescent literacy skills and its particular importance for struggling readers. Review Handout 3.1 silently, then discuss with a partner the following questions from the handout:  What was the most critical key point from this list? Why?  How do the literacy principles relate to the academic work your students do each day in all of their classes?
    5. 5.  We will now look at these same literacy principles through the lens of the struggling readers in our classes. Review the Key Points About Struggling Secondary Readers (Handout 3.2) and discuss, with a partner, the questions printed on the bottom of the handout.  Have you experienced these types of readers in your classrooms? If so, with what specifically have they struggled with in relation to the four principles? (Do you find that most of your students struggle with fluency? Motivation?)  Given this research on what struggling secondary students need, would you modify your thoughts on what you believe your unique role to be as a secondary ELA teacher?
    6. 6. Reflect: Flip back to Handout 1.7 (pg 78). Record any new thoughts you have about your unique role as a secondary ELA teacher.
    7. 7. Agenda: 5:00- 5:15 Opening  Defining the Reading Principles Through the Lens of Struggling Readers 5:15-6:25 Section 1  Introduction to the Inquiry Process 6:25-6:40 MIY Protocol  Strong Voice 6:40-7:45 Section 2  How Do Diagnose Reading Achievement Levels? 7:45-8:00- Closing  Reflection and Next Steps
    8. 8. Section One: Introduction to theInquiry Process We will now examine the role of reading assessment. In this section we will learn about how assessment and data will be used in this course. We will later explore how to use that information to inform motivation and instructional strategies for developing fluency, vocabulary and comprehension Definition of Assessment: Assessment is an ongoing process of determining the level at which students are performing and whether or not instruction is working. Key Message: Assessment is a key component to closing the achievement gap. Teachers need to use ongoing assessments to be highly effective in the classroom.
    9. 9.  Take out your homework (Handout 2.9, pg 93) Turn and Talk to a partner about the following questions:■ In what ways is assessment a key component to supporting struggling readers and closing the achievement gap?■ Which of the assessments (listed on Handout 2.9) have you already gathered, examined or given? How have you used this data?
    10. 10.  We are going to read a short article that illustrates the importance of ongoing classroom assessment and its implications. Read Handout 3.7 (pg 29): Ongoing Classroom Assessment. As you read, underline the important parts in the article and once you are finished, write down two major ideas you want to remember and return to. Share Out
    11. 11. Discussion: How do the main points in the article relate to the conversations you had in pairs at the beginning of this section? What aspect of this article do you find useful in terms of your experience as educator?
    12. 12. Key Messages from the Article:■ Assessment options are meaningless unless their results are usedto make decisions for improving student achievement.■ In a culture of assessment, students are deeply involved in theassessment process.■ ‘Gradebooks’ should be used for charting useful information inmaking decisions, not just recording assignment completion.■ In a culture of assessment, data is analyzed and decisions arefounded solidly on how students are working toward the ongoinggoal of increasing student achievement.■ Teachers should become critical consumers of the curricula theyuseto teach, and they modify the curriculum based on the assessmentdata to assure mastery of the content standards for all students.
    13. 13. The Inquiry Process: Take a look at handout 3.8 (pg 130) as well as the poster demonstrating the Inquiry Process Take in the points from the process chart for a couple of minutes. Try to make sense of it and generate questions if any aspect confuses you. Next, let’s walk through this process together. It is very important that all participants understand the inquiry process—and ask questions about it if you don’t—because it will be your guide to making the most effective data-driven instructional choices in each session.
    14. 14. Questions (record responses on chart paper): What do you think will be effective about the process? What questions do you have about the process? How much of this type of inquiry have you done before, even if the steps were not called the same things?
    15. 15. Looking ahead: Participants will use the inquiry process in this course to diagnose, set goals, plan, teach, evaluate, and respond, first with student reading and then with student writing. You will have a chance to touch base with colleagues on the process routine and data they have collected in subsequent sessions. There will also be an entire session about data and responding to student needs. One of the primary challenges of teaching secondary ELA is determining how to address a wide range of learning styles. The next section addresses the first step in effectively teaching students with a wide range of abilities—namely, diagnosing current achievement levels.
    16. 16. Let’s chart some challenges:Step One: Identify 3-5 major challenges with the Inquiry Process and record.Step Two: In small groups, you’ll each be assigned a challenge. Try to generate ideas and strategies you can use to overcome the challenge. Record.Step Three: Gallery Walk. As you walk, use your post-its to offer additional solutions or strategies.Step Four: Each group share out new solutions from post-its that you think might be particularly useful.Step Five: Complete Handout 3.14 (pg 145).
    17. 17. Agenda: 5:00- 5:15 Opening  Defining the Reading Principles Through the Lens of Struggling Readers 5:15-6:25 Section 1  Introduction to the Inquiry Process 6:25-6:40 MIY Protocol  Strong Voice 6:40-7:45 Section 2  How Do Diagnose Reading Achievement Levels? 7:45-8:00- Closing  Reflection and Next Steps
    18. 18. MIY Protocol: Strong Voice Review Look Fors Assess using video In groups of 3-4, one person will practice skill while one person will initiate 3-4 minor infractions (e.g. calling out answers, looking in desk, tapping pencil, failing to track speaker). Other members will use Look For form to give feedback. Switch until all members have practiced. 18
    19. 19. Section Two: This section introduces an assessment suite that will be used to measure student interest, reading abilities and content knowledge. When combined, these assessments ultimately help teachers measure both literacy skills and content knowledge—both critical elements to measure in any secondary ELA course. Two of these tools—the San Diego Quick Assessment and the Cloze Silent Reading Comprehension Assessment— are the optional assessments that you may use to monitor student progress in literacy skills development. Additionally, we will introduce other formative assessment techniques that can be used to assess each of the reading principles introduced in this course.
    20. 20.  Let’s look at Handout 3.10 together and discuss (pg 133):■ What is the difference between these inventories?■ What kind of information do these provide?■ What implications does this information have for the planning and/or delivery of instruction within your classroom?■ What implications does this information have for the materials you need?
    21. 21. Key Messages:■ The questions on many interest inventories investigate a student’s experiential background, reading patterns, books and magazines read, and other interests.■ Some inventories (e.g., Sample Three) provide information on the student’s attitudes and emotions based on aspects of his/her personal, social and academic lives.■ Interest inventories can be teacher-created, found online or purchased through publications or commercial sources.■ Inventories can be delivered as a personal interview, or they can be distributed for students to complete independently.■ Participants need to be sensitive to diverse family/guardian situations before administering survey questions, such as some of those on samples Two and Three, which assume students have a mother and father in their lives.■ Developing an understanding of the interests of the students allows the teacher to use and build upon these interests to increase engagement and motivation.
    22. 22.  The following informal assessments provide two quick ways to gain some understanding of the reading abilities and needs of the students within your classroom. Let’s take a look at the San Diego Quick Assessment of Reading Ability on Handout 3.12.■ What information does the San Diego Quick Assessment provide?■ How might the information from the assessment affect my instruction?
    23. 23. Next, let’s take a look at the Reading Comprehension Assessment on Handout 3.13 (pg 142). The Cloze Reading handout included in the Participant’s Manual is just a sample. You are asked to create your own cloze assessments from resources you are using in your classrooms (e.g., novels, textbooks, newspaper articles) using the guidelines for developing cloze assessments provided in Handout 3.13.
    24. 24. Discussion:■ What information does the Cloze Silent Reading Comprehension Assessment provide?■ How does this information relate to the content domain?■ How might the information from the assessment affect my instruction?■ In what ways does the cloze assessment complement the San Diego Quick Assessment?■ Why might it be important to develop cloze assessments using both informational/expository text and narrative text?
    25. 25. Key Points: By developing cloze assessments using your own resources, you are able to connect assessment in an authentic way to what you are teaching during any given lesson or unit. I encourage you to develop cloze assessments using a wide variety of material (informational text as well as narratives) in order to assess student abilities with multiple types of text and help prepare students for the multiple types of reading required both in and out of the classroom. Fluency with expository text (e.g., textbooks, technical documents, policy statements) is critical to secondary students’ success.
    26. 26. Key Points continued:■ There are numerous reading assessments that provide a variety of information about readers.■ It is important to evaluate what kind of information each reading assessment is providing about the student. Most assessments give only a partial view of the reader. Informal reading observations and conferences should be taken into consideration in addition to most assessments when determining the reading ability of a student.■ One method for determining students’ reading abilities that is often forgotten is using student records. Examining results from the previous year’s state-mandated tests and other information within a student’s fi lecan provide valuable insight.
    27. 27. Assignment: Administer the Clozeand SD Assessments with your You will be responsible for testing at least 20 students from one of your classes, with both assessments. You should select a class that would benefit from further differentiating of instruction and should select students from a range of reading levels (i.e., strong, average and struggling readers). Other suggestions for selecting students include choosing a class period that comes right after a conference or prep period to allow time for set up, or choosing the most challenging class You will need to have all the assessments completed and scores recorded by Session 6. You will use the results of the assessments to set goals and plan differentiated instruction for the students. Pay attention to the “directions” on handout 3.12 and the “directions” and “scoring” on handout 3.13. Due to the wide variation in your students’ reading levels, you will likely need to administer several different cloze passages.
    28. 28. Agenda: 5:00- 5:15 Opening  Defining the Reading Principles Through the Lens of Struggling Readers 5:15-6:25 Section 1  Introduction to the Inquiry Process 6:25-6:40 MIY Protocol  Strong Voice 6:40-7:45 Section 2  How Do Diagnose Reading Achievement Levels? 7:45-8:00- Closing  Reflection and Next Steps
    29. 29. Objectives: DEFINE reading principles unique to the secondary grade levels as a prerequisite for effectively assessing and developing these principles in students. EXAMINE and articulate the purpose of the inquiry process and internalize the steps in the process to begin implementation with students. EXAMINE, administer, and score reading assessments to diagnose student reading proficiency skills. REFINE skill in using Strong Voice through practice and targeted feedback.
    30. 30. Questions to consider How can the assessments discussed in the previous section help assess the four literacy principles reviewed earlier in the session? Why is it important to assess and monitor student progress toward mastery of the literacy principles? How can the inquiry process introduced earlier in this session help teachers monitor student progress and instructional efficacy? How could the information from the San Diego Quick and Cloze Assessments help you target instruction for struggling readers?
    31. 31. Moving forward:■ The first three sessions enabled participants to gain a general understanding of the reading principles that constitute the ELA content domain. These sessions also equipped participants with assessment tools to diagnose students’ needs, with specific attention paid to needs of struggling students.■ The next series of sessions will focus in-depth on each of the reading principles. Sessions 1–3 provided foundational knowledge of the ELA content domain, within the context of struggling students and tools to concretely identify student needs, and have all set the stage for an in-depth examination of each of the literacy principles.■ During each of the upcoming sessions we will explore teaching strategies unique to each of the reading principles in order to better equip participants with instructional choices that addresses each student’s specific needs.
    32. 32. Moving forward■ It will be helpful for participants to immediately begin diagnosing students, using the assessment tools reviewed during this session, in order to link student needs to the strategies reviewed in subsequent sessions.■ Session 4 will focus on fluency and vocabulary, Session 5 on comprehension, and Session 6 on motivation, which will serve as a bridge from the reading principles to a focus on writing.■ Throughout the upcoming reading principle sessions keep in mind the concrete needs of struggling ELA students as discussed during this session and how the strategies unique to each of the literacy principles may need to be modified for these students.
    33. 33. Homework: Using handouts 3.12 and 3.13 administer assessments on at least one of your students and identify the challenges with implementation Return for the next session prepared to discuss implementation challenges. Complete Handout 3.15. To do this, you will need to choose a student with a typical course schedule and look through the texts that this student is expected to read on a given day. They should write down all of the vocabulary terms that the student is not likely to be familiar with. Bring Handouts 2.7, 3.14 and 3.15 with you to the next session. Bring a unit you are or will be teaching that could benefit from additional or modified vocabulary strategies.

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