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“The Five Meetings You Meet in Web Design” by Kevin Hoffman (Now What? Conference 2016)

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Web site building techniques are always changing, but the meetings supporting that work sadly haven’t changed much at all. At the core of every meeting is a group of human brains, and against the breakneck pace of iPhone model releases those brains have not evolved in the slightest. Better meeting design for web professionals addresses this constraint. Every web design organization has a core curriculum of five types of meeting goals: getting started, checking in, presenting, exploring, and the big finish. Each of the five meetings have classic mistakes, unique opportunities, best executions, and remote work implications. Kevin will explore how each of the five meetings is an opportunity to do your best work, with plenty of examples you can start using right away.

From the 2016 Now What? Conference: www.nowwhatconference.com

Published in: Internet
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“The Five Meetings You Meet in Web Design” by Kevin Hoffman (Now What? Conference 2016)

  1. 1. The Five Meetings Now What? April 14, 2016 sevenheadsdesign.com@kevinmhoffman
  2. 2. The Five Meetings Now What? April 14, 2016 sevenheadsdesign.com@kevinmhoffman
  3. 3. Beliefs What do they do for us? 0.
  4. 4. Me >
  5. 5. Source: huffingtonpost.com
  6. 6. XING is pronounced ZING.”“
  7. 7. Source: http://txblacks.blogspot.com/
  8. 8. Meetings prevent work. More meetings evidence collaboration. Meetings don’t have agendas. Meetings are great at my company.
  9. 9. Source: http://endlessocean.wikia.com
  10. 10. What is a design problem?
  11. 11. 1.shows intention 2.has constraints a design problem… Source: The Problem of Design Problems, Kees Dorst
  12. 12. Intention?
  13. 13. Intention?
  14. 14. Intention!
  15. 15. Intention!
  16. 16. Constraint?
  17. 17. < Big Ass Constraint
  18. 18. Such Constraint >
  19. 19. Ultimate Constraint >
  20. 20. 1. manifest or prevent intended outcomes 2.are partially limited by culture, time, ideas, & people meetings…
  21. 21. Meetings are a great design problem! But we don’t treat them like one.
  22. 22. 1. Beginnings 2.Presentations 3.Middles 4.Explorations 5.Endings The five (5) meetings…
  23. 23. Ye Olde Constraints
  24. 24. Beginnings Meetings that help us get started. 1.
  25. 25. Donor: The Social HelperDoesn’t typically donate to CPS… yet.
  26. 26. Visual listening makes good meetings even better.
  27. 27. Source: Todd Zenger, What is the Theory of Your Firm? Harvard Business Review, June 2013 | Illustration Copyright Disney, 1957
  28. 28. Seeing a thing > Form Stronger, Deeper Memories
  29. 29. 1. Full circle represents the meeting length 2.Time-on-task is scaled against that length Visual Agenda
  30. 30. Actively choose an approach that manages assumptions Visualize anything and everything, especially agendas, findings, processes, and rough ideas Beginnings1. A few thoughts about designing better
  31. 31. Presentations Where we tell the user’s story, not the designers. 2.
  32. 32. Source: http://www.fxnetworks.com
  33. 33. Source: The User’s Journey, Rosenfeld Media Artist: Eva-Lotta Lamm
  34. 34. Source: The User’s Journey, Rosenfeld Media Artist: Eva-Lotta Lamm
  35. 35. Presentations are stories. But we learn to give them as real estate tours for some reason.
  36. 36. 1. beginnings 2.middles 3.endings 4.actions 5.motivations presentation stories…
  37. 37. Research a problem and define a solution. Consider multiple approaches. Iterate on the best option. Ship and repeat if necessary.
  38. 38. Research Problem: The design isn’t working. Develop 
 design principles and business goals.
 Solution: The client approves the design.
  39. 39. Approach 1: Present screens in navigation sequence, top to bottom. (real estate tour) Approach 2: Present art direction rationale and only home page. Approach 3: Present a user story in sequence.
  40. 40. Present internally to colleagues. Revise. Present to client/department contacts. Revise.
  41. 41. Approved? Great! Not approved? Consider a different approach for 
 that client or department, or ones like it.
  42. 42. Use good story structure to tell the user’s story Approach them (and any meeting) as a design problem Presentations2. A few thoughts about designing better
  43. 43. Middles Meetings that keep people moving forward. 3.
  44. 44. 1. Daily team asynchronous check-in. 2.Weekly team check-in. 3.Weekly client check-in. Three check-in meetings…
  45. 45. Yesterday: Today: Blockers: 1. 2. 3.
  46. 46. Optional As Long As Necessary “Lean Coffee” 1. 2. 3.
  47. 47. What is a lean coffee?
  48. 48. http://www.boardthing.com
  49. 49. http://www.boardthing.com
  50. 50. http://www.pbs.org Source: http://www.leancoffee.org
  51. 51. How many? Which ones? >
  52. 52. NEW
 TOPIC Ideas FTW! Make a Decision In a Group
  53. 53. Explore distributed approaches, even if you work in the same office Lean coffee is where it’s at! Middles3. A few thoughts about designing better
  54. 54. Explorations Meetings that help people find their way. 4.
  55. 55. Source: joseph-imre.com/
  56. 56. James Macanufo The 90/6/6 rule.
  57. 57. 90 minutes 6 ideas at a stretch 6 people in a group 1. 2. 3.
  58. 58. Why 90 minutes?
  59. 59. Lasts for 30 seconds Capacity varies between individuals Tied to 
 AD/HD Working Memory
  60. 60. Has distinct processes for what we hear and what we see: “phonological loop” and “visual spatial sketchpad” Brain damage research demonstrates how these work independently but also combine Working Memory
  61. 61. Lasts 2 to 3 hours What memories “leave the meeting” Biochemical changes in proteins in your brain Intermediate Memory
  62. 62. WORKING INTERMEDIATE “THE SESSION” LASTING 90 MINUTES
  63. 63. WORKING INTERMEDIATE “THE SESSION” LASTING 90 MINUTES AURAL AND VISUAL LISTENING REFLECTION AND DISCUSSION
  64. 64. Why 6 ideas?
  65. 65. Complex
 Ideas TEN MINUTES Rhythm of Ideas…
  66. 66. Complex
 Ideas TEN MINUTES REFLECTION/DISCUSSION Rhythm of Ideas…
  67. 67. Why 6 people?
  68. 68. TEAM
 SIZE 2 3 4 5 6 7 POINTS
 OF AGREEMENT 1 3 6 10 15 21 Team Alignment
  69. 69. TEAM
 SIZE 2 3 4 5 6 POINTS
 OF AGREEMENT 1 3 6 10 15 Team Alignment
  70. 70. 90 minutes at time 6 ideas every 10 minutes, with 10 additional minutes for discussion 6 people or less per group Explorations4. A few thoughts about designing better
  71. 71. Endings Meetings that help us find (and learn from) closure. 5.
  72. 72. The Creativity Bias
  73. 73. + /
  74. 74. What is the meeting secret sauce of agile process?
  75. 75. Tradition Project Pace Agile Project Pace Fewer, longer meetings, more time between them. More, shorter meetings, less time between them.
  76. 76. Sprint Definition Scrum Retrospective 1. 2. 3. (Repeat)
  77. 77. List wins. List problems. List changes. Post and discuss. 1. 2. 3. 4. +
  78. 78. It’s your fault!
  79. 79. 1. Actions taken 2.Outcomes observed 3.Results expected 4.Assumptions made 5.Events observed “Blameless” post mortem… Source: https://codeascraft.com/2012/05/22/blameless-postmortems/
  80. 80. Structure discussions around a “plus/delta” framework Follow a “blameless” approach to what went wrong - see Etsy’s “Just Culture” Endings5. A few thoughts about designing better
  81. 81. Nowwhat? Meetings explain, make, and improve our working culture. 6.
  82. 82. Stegoceratops!
  83. 83. Novelty? Innvoation?
  84. 84. Novelty.
  85. 85. Source: https://css-tricks.com/examples/ImageReplacement/ Novelty.
  86. 86. http://www.typekit.com Innovation.
  87. 87. Jeffrey Veen Greg Veen Jason Santa Maria Original Typekit Team
  88. 88. Mom> Me >
  89. 89. Everyone in the room believes they are doing the right thing. I believe that
  90. 90. Slides? Thank you! http://kevinmh.co/m/7s sevenheadsdesign.com@kevinmhoffman
  91. 91. Resources: Books The Future of Competition 
 (Pralahad & Ramaswamy) Lean UX (Gothelf & Seiden) Visual Leaders 
 Visual Teams
 Visual Meetings (Sibbett) A Facilitator's Guide to Participatory Decision Making (Kaner, et al) How to Make Meetings Work 
 (Doyle & Strauss) The Rapid Vis Toolkit (Hanks) Gamestorming (Gray, Macanufo & Brown)
 
 The Connected Company 
 (Gray w/Vander Wal ) The Doodle Revolution (Sunni Brown) The Back of the Napkin (Dan Roam) Business Model Generation 
 (Alex Osterwalder, et al) Collaboration (Hansen)
 
 Collaborating Effectively 
 (Harvard Business Review) Moments of Impact (Solomon & Ertel) Designing the Conversation 
 (Unger, Nunnally& Willis) Designing Together (Brown) Remote: Office Not Required 
 (Fried & Hansson) These books helped me develop this presentation. Books make you smart!

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