Medieval Song on the Web

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Presentation: Medieval Song Network September 2011 (Senate House, London)

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  • Collaborate, annotate, teach, study, publish
  • Medieval Song on the Web

    1. 1. Medieval Song on the WebImage, Text, Media, and Annotation Robert Sanderson rsanderson@lanl.gov Los Alamos National Laboratory Benjamin Albritton blalbrit@stanford.edu Stanford University http://lib.stanford.edu/dmm http://www.shared-canvas.org/ This presentation arises from work that is funded, in part, by the Andrew W. Mellon Foundation Medieval Song on the Web 1Senate House, 12th of September 2011, London, England
    2. 2. Overview•  Medieval Song in the Digital Environment•  Annotation of web-based resources•  Motivation and light framework overview•  Use-cases and demos•  Possible next-steps for song projects wanting to use digital tools and resources Medieval Song on the Web 2 Senate House, 12th of September 2011, London, England
    3. 3. Describing Song•  How to adequately discuss a complex, compound entity? •  Text or texts •  Music (often multiple simultaneous voices) •  Performance •  Manuscript witnesses •  Mise-en-page and other issues of layout •  Variants •  Decorations •  The interactions and relationships between these elements•  Beyond the individual scholar Medieval Song on the Web 3 Senate House, 12th of September 2011, London, England
    4. 4. From Analog to Digital Narrative Argument Transcribed Example Analytical Reduction Explanatory Annotation Describing ExampleJennifer Bain, “Theorizing the Cadence in the Music of Machaut,”Journal of Music Theory 47/2 (2003), 334-35 Medieval Song on the Web 4 Senate House, 12th of September 2011, London, England
    5. 5. Using and Presenting Digital FacsimilesSome Requirements:•  Gather information from various sources•  Multiple layers of commentary•  Ability to provide context for examples•  Include all of the data that supports the argument•  Allow feedback•  Include many types of media•  Possibility of non-linearity•  Permanence•  And… ? Medieval Song on the Web 5 Senate House, 12th of September 2011, London, England
    6. 6. Motivating QuestionsMany implicit assumptions: •  What is a Manuscript? •  What is its relation to a facsimile? •  What is the relation of a transcription of a facsimile to the original object?What does this mean for digital tools?•  How do we rethink digital facsimiles in a shared, distributed, global space?•  How do we enable collaboration and encourage engagement? Ms MurF: 10.5076/e-codices-kba-0003 Medieval Song on the Web 6 Senate House, 12th of September 2011, London, England
    7. 7. VisionA collaborative future:•  Rich landscape of interconnected repositories of images, texts, media•  Seamless user interfaces disconnected from the repositories•  Improve efficiency and usability through open, shared development•  Requirements: •  Shared data model •  Shared services for facsimiles and scholarly data BNF f.fr 113, folio 1 recto Medieval Song on the Web 7 Senate House, 12th of September 2011, London, England
    8. 8. Naïve Approach: Transcribe Images DirectlyBut how to align multiple images, pages without images, fragments… ?! Medieval Song on the Web 8 Senate House, 12th of September 2011, London, England
    9. 9. Naïve Approach: Multiple RepresentationsCCC 26 f. iiiR Medieval Song on the Web 9 Senate House, 12th of September 2011, London, England
    10. 10. Naïve Approach: Multiple RepresentationsCCC 26 f. iiiR Fold A Open Medieval Song on the Web 10 Senate House, 12th of September 2011, London, England
    11. 11. Naïve Approach: Multiple RepresentationsCCC 26 f. iiiR Fold A Open Fold A and B Open Medieval Song on the Web 11 Senate House, 12th of September 2011, London, England
    12. 12. Naïve Approach: Multiple RepresentationsCCC 26 f. iiiR Fold A Open Fold A and B Open f. iiiV Medieval Song on the Web 12 Senate House, 12th of September 2011, London, England
    13. 13. Canvas Paradigm•  A Canvas is an empty space in which to build up a display•  A SharedCanvass top left and bottom right corners correspond tothe equivalent corners of a folio Medieval Song on the Web 13 Senate House, 12th of September 2011, London, England
    14. 14. Technology: Open Annotation•  http://www.openannotation.org/•  Focus on interoperable sharing of annotations •  Web-centric and open, not locked down silos •  Create, consume and interact in different environments•  “Annotation” •  Scholarly commentary about the manuscript •  Painting resources on the SharedCanvas•  Hardest part: Define what an Annotation is! •  "Aboutness" is key to distinguish from general metadata A document that describes how one resource is about one or more other resources, or part thereof. Medieval Song on the Web 14 Senate House, 12th of September 2011, London, England
    15. 15. Open Annotation Model•  Annotation (a document)•  Body (the ‘comment’ of the annotation)•  Target (the resource the Body is ‘about’) Medieval Song on the Web 15 Senate House, 12th of September 2011, London, England
    16. 16. OAC Annotations to Paint Images Medieval Song on the Web 16Senate House, 12th of September 2011, London, England
    17. 17. OAC Annotations to Paint Text Medieval Song on the Web 17Senate House, 12th of September 2011, London, England
    18. 18. Transcription: Morgan 804 Medieval Song on the Web 18Senate House, 12th of September 2011, London, England
    19. 19. Transcription: Morgan 804 Medieval Song on the Web 19Senate House, 12th of September 2011, London, England
    20. 20. Demo 1: Layering Image and Text•  http://shared-canvas.org/impl/demo1 Medieval Song on the Web 20 Senate House, 12th of September 2011, London, England
    21. 21. Musical Manuscripts: Parker CCC 008 Medieval Song on the Web 21 Senate House, 12th of September 2011, London, England
    22. 22. Demo 2: Beyond Text (Music and Media)•  http://shared-canvas.org/impl/demo2 Medieval Song on the Web 22 Senate House, 12th of September 2011, London, England
    23. 23. Demo 3: Transcribing in the Digital Environment•  Work with interoperable repositories•  Use tools designed for the task: •  Transcription •  Annotation Medieval Song on the Web 23 Senate House, 12th of September 2011, London, England
    24. 24. SummaryModel:Canvas paradigm provides a coherent solution to modeling the layoutof medieval manuscripts •  Annotations, and Collaboration, at the heart of the modelImplementation: •  Distribution across repositories for images, text, commentary •  Consistent methods to access content from many repositories •  Encourages tool development by experts in the fieldThe SharedCanvas model implemented by distributed repositoriesbrings the humanists primary research objects to their desktop in apowerful, extensible and interoperable fashion Medieval Song on the Web 24 Senate House, 12th of September 2011, London, England
    25. 25. Conclusion: Next StepsProject-centric Approach:•  Identify research goals•  Encourage interoperability•  Use existing tools or develop new modules in the interoperable environment •  What is specific to song study? •  What is general?•  Build teams that include digital repositories, software developers, and scholars Medieval Song on the Web 25 Senate House, 12th of September 2011, London, England
    26. 26. Thank You Robert Sanderson rsanderson@lanl.gov azaroth42@gmail.com @azaroth42 Benjamin Albritton blalbrit@stanford.edu @bla222 Web: http://lib.stanford.edu/dmm http://www.shared-canvas.org/ Paper: http://arxiv.org/abs/1104.2925 Slides: http://slidesha.re/oJnmGe AcknowledgementsDMSTech Group: http://dmstech.group.stanford.edu/Open Annotation Collaboration: http://www.openannotation.org/ Medieval Song on the Web 26 Senate House, 12th of September 2011, London, England

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