ACTIVE CITIZENSHIP
Working and Growing together in a Global Village


                  Jeremy Black
                 Geof...
WHAT IS ACTIVE CITIZENSHIP?
•   Character education: values/promotes caring, respect, empathy

•   Choosing an issue that ...
WHY DO IT?
•   Experiential (cater to different learning styles)

•   Authentic, relevant , meaningful opportunities and f...
WHY DO IT?
•   Can be multi-disciplinary although it is often embedded within social studies

•   Follows a problem-based ...
CATEGORIES OF CITIZENSHIP
1.   Justice-oriented:

•    Seeks out and addresses areas of injustice (gets involved in social...
STEPS FOR TAKING MEANINGFUL
1.
                            ACTION
     Describe a good citizen:

•    What does it look, f...
STEPS FOR TAKING MEANINGFUL
                ACTION
5.   Form the group:

•    Groups will be decided based on using the ca...
STEPS FOR TAKING MEANINGFUL
                 ACTION
9.    Identify Barriers:

•     Identify barriers and then devise meth...
TIPS
1.Take only Positive Positions:

  • Saying what you are for not against
2. Listen to all Peoples’ Views:

  • Facili...
5. Be Persistent:
                                       TIPS
   • Remind students that complex
     issues take time.

6....
EXAMPLES OF ACTION
Direct Action:

 •   Supplying schools around the world
     (project love)

 •   Building awareness in...
ACTIVITY

 1. Turn and Talk:


 At your tables, you have 1 minute to discuss with your colleagues
  the pros and cons to i...
FINAL ACTIVITY




     10 x 10 Challenge

 (www.freethechildren.com)
REFERENCES
Burgess, T., (2003). Engaging students in sustainable action projects: workshop
   participant guide.




Case,...
CHALLENGES OF ACTIVE
•
             CITIZENSHIP
    Lack of control

•   Not enough clarity or guidelines on how to implem...
CHALLENGES OF ACTIVE
                CITIZENSHIP
•   Learners having difficulty constructing a logical argument

•   Learne...
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EFDN - Active Citizenship

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  • EFDN - Active Citizenship

    1. 1. ACTIVE CITIZENSHIP Working and Growing together in a Global Village Jeremy Black Geoff Groholski Heather Reid
    2. 2. WHAT IS ACTIVE CITIZENSHIP? • Character education: values/promotes caring, respect, empathy • Choosing an issue that is important to the group (democracy in the room) • Visioning, researching, acting, and reflecting • Not a linear experience • Research into root causes, multiple perspectives, and stakeholders • Meaningful engagement • Promoting students to think locally and globally
    3. 3. WHY DO IT? • Experiential (cater to different learning styles) • Authentic, relevant , meaningful opportunities and for taking responsibility • Can creates relationship between the people in the school and the wider community • Increases likelihood that students will engage in future action projects • Values cultural diversity
    4. 4. WHY DO IT? • Can be multi-disciplinary although it is often embedded within social studies • Follows a problem-based approach (you identify a problem and actively seek a realistic solution) • Covers the three broad areas of curriculum: life-long learning, social responsibility, and engaged citizenship • Promotes metacognitive thinking skills and has been correlated with increased cognitive achievement
    5. 5. CATEGORIES OF CITIZENSHIP 1. Justice-oriented: • Seeks out and addresses areas of injustice (gets involved in social movements) 2. Participatory: • Organizes community efforts to care for those in need 3. Personally Responsible: • Volunteers, recycles
    6. 6. STEPS FOR TAKING MEANINGFUL 1. ACTION Describe a good citizen: • What does it look, feel, sound like? 2. Raise awareness: • Have students document issues they see around them (internet, the news, school) • Generate a list in the classroom 3. Class will choose an issue: • Class will democratically choose the issue from the generated list and state the problem to addressed 4. Build Motivation: • Research, create an individual written/visual response to the question “Why care?”
    7. 7. STEPS FOR TAKING MEANINGFUL ACTION 5. Form the group: • Groups will be decided based on using the categories of citizenship OR based on similar interests 6. Investigate: • 5Ws/how, information needs (resources), categorizing causes, explore options for possible solutions and potential consequences of those solutions 7. Make a plan: • Define parameters (develop timelines, deciding and defining roles and responsibilities of the group, revise as necessary) 8. Define Success: • Choose a goal for success that is realistic, constructive, appropriate, and motivating
    8. 8. STEPS FOR TAKING MEANINGFUL ACTION 9. Identify Barriers: • Identify barriers and then devise methods to deal with them 10. Teach Skills: • Decide what skills and knowledge students need to complete the project, which you may have to teach them explicitly 11. DO IT!!!: • Check in with your action plan and continue to revise • Have students write reflections (i.e. Why do you think you are an effective group member? What do you think you could do differently?)
    9. 9. TIPS 1.Take only Positive Positions: • Saying what you are for not against 2. Listen to all Peoples’ Views: • Facilitate deliberative dialogue amongst students (listen to all views/alternatives) 3. Avoid Stereotyping: • Do not lump individuals into a category 4. Accept Responsibility: • Make sure students know that there will be no blaming the others if there is a lack of success
    10. 10. 5. Be Persistent: TIPS • Remind students that complex issues take time. 6. Act: • Micro-movements are better than no movements 7. Assessment • Ongoing 8. Celebrate • Celebrate milestones along the way to maintain motivation
    11. 11. EXAMPLES OF ACTION Direct Action: • Supplying schools around the world (project love) • Building awareness in the school • Adopting a salmon stream Indirect Action: • Fundraising to help build a school (www.freethechildren.com) • Helping to reduce blindness in Nepal • Writing for the local newspaper
    12. 12. ACTIVITY 1. Turn and Talk: At your tables, you have 1 minute to discuss with your colleagues the pros and cons to implement this model of learning? 2. Turn and Talk: Do you think this is a more progressive or more orthodox approach to teaching?
    13. 13. FINAL ACTIVITY 10 x 10 Challenge (www.freethechildren.com)
    14. 14. REFERENCES Burgess, T., (2003). Engaging students in sustainable action projects: workshop participant guide. Case, R., Falk, C., Smith, N., Werner., (2004). Active citizenship: Student action projects. Vancouver: The Critical Thinking Consortium Ponder, J., Lewis-Ferrel, G. (2009). The butterfly effect: The impact of citizenship education. California: Heldref
    15. 15. CHALLENGES OF ACTIVE • CITIZENSHIP Lack of control • Not enough clarity or guidelines on how to implement active citizenship • Not enough teacher training • Classroom organization • Physical organization of schools—lack of systematic support • Meeting curricular policies • Effective time management for the teacher and student (hard to complete in 50 minutes) • Conflict with teacher pedagogy and beliefs on teaching • Learners having difficulty generating questions of inquiry • Learners having difficulty with transforming data
    16. 16. CHALLENGES OF ACTIVE CITIZENSHIP • Learners having difficulty constructing a logical argument • Learners struggling with sustaining their motivation with the inquiry • Not enough accessibility to technology • Increase of political pressure to meet learning outcomes • Can only cover depth not breadth of the curriculum • Teachers not showing their full expertise • A fear of fundamental concepts would be left out • Students restrict the different teaching styles--if students are given power in the learning environment then they may put the pressure for the teacher to control them again • Assessment— difficult in knowing/testing students factual knowledge

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