The mind is not a vessel to be filled, but a fire to be ignited.                               (Plutarch)
Definition"Taxonomy”         simply      means“classification”, so the well-knowntaxonomy of learning objectives isan     ...
Toward Productive Pedagogies• Students are engaged only in lower-order thinking; i.e.  they receive, or recite, or partici...
History of Bloom’s TaxonomyGenerated in 1948 by psychologist BenjaminBloom and several colleagues. Originallydeveloped as ...
Original Terms              New Terms• Evaluation                       •Creating• Synthesis                        •Evalu...
This world is but a canvasfor our imaginations.           (Henry David Thoreau)
RememberingThe learner is able to recall, restate and remember  learned information.  –   Recognising  –   Listing  –   De...
Remembering•   List•   Memorise        •   Listen•   Relate          •   Group•   Show                                    ...
Classroom Roles for RememberingTeacher roles       Student roles•   Directs         •   Responds•   Tells           •   Ab...
Remembering: Potential Activities and              Products• Make a story map showing the main events of the  story.• Make...
Questions for Remembering•   What happened after...?•   How many...?•   What is...?•   Who was it that...?•   Can you name...
UnderstandingThe learner grasps the meaning of information by  interpreting and translating what has been learned.   –   I...
Understanding cont’•   Restate            • Describe•   Identify           • Report                  Understanding•   Disc...
Classroom Roles for UnderstandingTeacher roles        Student roles•   Demonstrates     •   Explains•   Listens          •...
Understanding: Potential Activities and                   Products•   Write in your own words…•   Cut out, or draw picture...
Questions for Understanding•   Can you explain why…?•   Can you write in your own words?•   How would you explain…?•   Can...
ApplyingThe learner makes use of information in a context different  from the one in which it was learned.  – Implementing...
Applying cont’•   Translate     •   Paint•   Manipulate    •   Change                Using strategies,•   Exhibit       • ...
Classroom Roles for ApplyingTeacher roles       Student roles•   Shows           • Solves problems•   Facilitates     • De...
Applying: Potential Activities and Products•   Construct a model to demonstrate how it looks or works•   Practise a play a...
Questions for Applying•   Do you know of another instance where…?•   Can you group by characteristics such as…?•   Which f...
AnalysingThe learner breaks learned information into its parts to  best understand that information.   –   Comparing   –  ...
Analysing cont’•   Distinguish   •   Compare•   Question      •   Contrast•   Appraise      •   Survey                    ...
Classroom Roles for AnalysingTeacher roles            Student roles•   Probes               •   Discusses•   Guides       ...
Analysing: Potential Activities and Products•   Use a Venn Diagram to show how two topics are the same and different•   De...
Question for Analysing•   Which events could not have happened?•   If. ..happened, what might the ending have been?•   How...
EvaluatingThe learner makes decisions based on in-depth  reflection, criticism and assessment.  –   Checking  –   Hypothes...
Evaluating cont’•   Judge          ••   Rate                       Choose•   Validate       •   Conclude             Judgi...
Classroom Roles for EvaluatingTeacher roles           Student roles•   Clarifies           •   Judges•   Accepts          ...
Evaluating: Potential Activities and                     Products•   Write a letter to the editor•   Prepare and conduct a...
Questions for Evaluating•   Is there a better solution to...?•   Judge the value of... What do you think about...?•   Can ...
CreatingThe learner creates new ideas and information using  what has been previously learned.  –   Designing  –   Constru...
Creating cont’•   Compose•   Assemble     • Formulate•   Organise                             Putting together ideas•   In...
Classroom Roles for CreatingTeacher roles        Student roles•   Facilitates      •   Designs•   Extends          •   For...
Creating: Potential Activities and Products•    Use the SCAMPER strategy to invent a new type of sports shoe•    Invent a ...
Questions for Creating• Can you design a...to...?• Can you see a possible solution to...?• If you had access to all resour...
Importance of Bloom’s Taxonomy•   Suitable for use with the entire class•   Emphasis on certain levels for different child...
How does it all fit together?            Bloom’s            Revised           Taxonomy
A good teacher makes you think even when you don’t want to.     (Fisher, 1998, Teaching Thinking)
Bloom's taxonomy
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Bloom's taxonomy

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Bloom's taxonomy

  1. 1. The mind is not a vessel to be filled, but a fire to be ignited. (Plutarch)
  2. 2. Definition"Taxonomy” simply means“classification”, so the well-knowntaxonomy of learning objectives isan attempt (withinthe behavioral paradigm) toclassify forms and levels oflearning. http://www.learningandteaching.info/learning/bloomtax.htm
  3. 3. Toward Productive Pedagogies• Students are engaged only in lower-order thinking; i.e. they receive, or recite, or participate in routine practice… However,• Almost all students, almost all the time are engaged in higher-order thinking. Bloom’sHigher-order thinking involves:the transformation of informationand ideas. TaxonomyStudents combine facts and ideasSynthesiseGeneraliseExplainHypothesiseor arrive at some conclusion orinterpretation. (Department of Education, Queensland, 2002, p. 1)
  4. 4. History of Bloom’s TaxonomyGenerated in 1948 by psychologist BenjaminBloom and several colleagues. Originallydeveloped as a method of classifying educationalgoals for student performance evaluation,Revised over the years by Anderson andKrathwohl (1990, 2001) and is still utilized ineducation today. It is suggested that one cannot effectively — or ought not try to — address higher levels until those below them have been covered (it is thus effectively serial in structure). (http://www.learnnc.org/lp/pages/4719)
  5. 5. Original Terms New Terms• Evaluation •Creating• Synthesis •Evaluating• Analysis •Analyzing• Application •Applying• Comprehension •Understanding• Knowledge •Remembering Learning to Think, Thinking to Learn, 2000, p. 8)
  6. 6. This world is but a canvasfor our imaginations. (Henry David Thoreau)
  7. 7. RememberingThe learner is able to recall, restate and remember learned information. – Recognising – Listing – Describing – Identifying – Retrieving – Naming – Locating – Finding Can you recall information?
  8. 8. Remembering• List• Memorise • Listen• Relate • Group• Show Recall or• Locate • Choose recognition of• Distinguish • specific• Give example Recite information• Reproduce • Review• Quote• Repeat • Quote• Label • Record• Recall• Know • Match Products include:• Group • Select • Quiz • Label• Read• Write • Underline • Definition • List• Outline • Cite • Fact • Workbook • Sort • Worksheet • Reproduction • Test •Vocabulary
  9. 9. Classroom Roles for RememberingTeacher roles Student roles• Directs • Responds• Tells • Absorbs• Shows • Remembers• Examines • Recognises• Questions • Memorises• Evaluates • Defines • Describes • Retells • Passive recipient
  10. 10. Remembering: Potential Activities and Products• Make a story map showing the main events of the story.• Make a time line of your typical day.• Make a concept map of the topic.• Write a list of keywords you know about….• What characters were in the story?• Make a chart showing…• Make an acrostic poem about…• Recite a poem you have learnt.
  11. 11. Questions for Remembering• What happened after...?• How many...?• What is...?• Who was it that...?• Can you name ...?• Find the definition of…• Describe what happened after…• Who spoke to...?• Which is true or false...? (Pohl, Learning to Think, Thinking to Learn, p. 12)
  12. 12. UnderstandingThe learner grasps the meaning of information by interpreting and translating what has been learned. – Interpreting – Exemplifying – Summarising – Inferring – Paraphrasing – Classifying – Comparing – Explaining Can you explain ideas or concepts?
  13. 13. Understanding cont’• Restate • Describe• Identify • Report Understanding• Discuss • Recognise of given• Retell information • Review• Research • Observe• Annotate• • Outline Translate• Give examples of • Account for Products include:• Paraphrase • Interpret • Recitation • Example• Reorganise • Give main • Summary • Quiz• Associate idea • Collection • List • Estimate • Explanation • Label • Define • Show and tell • Outline
  14. 14. Classroom Roles for UnderstandingTeacher roles Student roles• Demonstrates • Explains• Listens • Describes• Questions • Outlines• Compares • Restates• Contrasts • Translates• Examines • Demonstrates • Interprets • Active participant
  15. 15. Understanding: Potential Activities and Products• Write in your own words…• Cut out, or draw pictures to illustrate a particular event in the story.• Report to the class…• Illustrate what you think the main idea may have been.• Make a cartoon strip showing the sequence of events in the story.• Write and perform a play based on the story.• Write a brief outline to explain this story to someone else• Explain why the character solved the problem in this particular way• Write a summary report of the event.• Prepare a flow chart to illustrate the sequence of events.• Make a colouring book.• Paraphrase this chapter in the book.• Retell in your own words.• Outline the main points.
  16. 16. Questions for Understanding• Can you explain why…?• Can you write in your own words?• How would you explain…?• Can you write a brief outline...?• What do you think could have happened next...?• Who do you think...?• What was the main idea...?• Can you clarify…?• Can you illustrate…?• Does everyone act in the way that …….. does?
  17. 17. ApplyingThe learner makes use of information in a context different from the one in which it was learned. – Implementing – Carrying out – Using – Executing Can you use the information in anotherfamiliar situation?
  18. 18. Applying cont’• Translate • Paint• Manipulate • Change Using strategies,• Exhibit • Compute concepts, principles• Illustrate and theories in new • Sequence situations• Calculate • Show• Interpret • Solve• Make • Collect• Practice • Demonstrate Products include:• Apply • Dramatise • Photograph • Presentation• Operate • Construct • Illustration • Interview• Interview • Use • Simulation • Performance • Adapt • Sculpture • Diary • Draw • Demonstration • Journal
  19. 19. Classroom Roles for ApplyingTeacher roles Student roles• Shows • Solves problems• Facilitates • Demonstrates use of• Observes knowledge• Evaluates • Calculates• Organises • Compiles• Questions • Completes • Illustrates • Constructs • Active recipient
  20. 20. Applying: Potential Activities and Products• Construct a model to demonstrate how it looks or works• Practise a play and perform it for the class• Make a diorama to illustrate an event• Write a diary entry• Make a scrapbook about the area of study.• Prepare invitations for a character’s birthday party• Make a topographic map• Take and display a collection of photographs on a particular topic.• Make up a puzzle or a game about the topic.• Write an explanation about this topic for others.• Dress a doll in national costume.• Make a clay model…• Paint a mural using the same materials.• Continue the story…
  21. 21. Questions for Applying• Do you know of another instance where…?• Can you group by characteristics such as…?• Which factors would you change if…?• What questions would you ask of…?• From the information given, can you develop a set of instructions about…?
  22. 22. AnalysingThe learner breaks learned information into its parts to best understand that information. – Comparing – Organising – Deconstructing – Attributing – Outlining – Finding – Structuring – IntegratingCan you break information into parts to explore understandings and relationships?
  23. 23. Analysing cont’• Distinguish • Compare• Question • Contrast• Appraise • Survey Breaking• Experiment • Detect information down• Inspect into its component• Examine • Group elements• Probe • Order• Separate • Sequence• Inquire • Test• Arrange • Debate• Investigate • Analyse Products include:• Sift • Diagram • Graph • Survey• Research • Relate• Calculate • • Spreadsheet • Database• Dissect Criticize • Categorise • Checklist • Mobile • Discriminate • Chart • Abstract • Outline • Report
  24. 24. Classroom Roles for AnalysingTeacher roles Student roles• Probes • Discusses• Guides • Uncovers• Observes • Argues• Evaluates • Debates• Acts as a resource • Thinks deeply• Questions • Tests• Organises • Examines• Dissects • Questions • Calculates • Investigates • Inquires • Active participant
  25. 25. Analysing: Potential Activities and Products• Use a Venn Diagram to show how two topics are the same and different• Design a questionnaire to gather information.• Survey classmates to find out what they think about a particular topic. Analyse the results.• Make a flow chart to show the critical stages.• Classify the actions of the characters in the book• Create a sociogram from the narrative• Construct a graph to illustrate selected information.• Make a family tree showing relationships.• Devise a roleplay about the study area.• Write a biography of a person studied.• Prepare a report about the area of study.• Conduct an investigation to produce information to support a view.• Review a work of art in terms of form, colour and texture.• Draw a graph• Complete a Decision Making Matrix to help you decide which breakfast cereal to purchase
  26. 26. Question for Analysing• Which events could not have happened?• If. ..happened, what might the ending have been?• How is...similar to...?• What do you see as other possible outcomes?• Why did...changes occur?• Can you explain what must have happened when...?• What are some or the problems of...?• Can you distinguish between...?• What were some of the motives behind..?• What was the turning point?• What was the problem with...?
  27. 27. EvaluatingThe learner makes decisions based on in-depth reflection, criticism and assessment. – Checking – Hypothesising – Critiquing – Experimenting – Judging – Testing – Detecting – MonitoringCan you justify a decision or course of action?
  28. 28. Evaluating cont’• Judge •• Rate Choose• Validate • Conclude Judging the value of• Predict • Deduce ideas, materials and• Assess • Debate methods by developing• Score • Justify and applying standards• Revise and criteria.• Infer • Recommend• Determine • Discriminate• Prioritise • Appraise• Tell why • Value• Compare • Probe Products include:• Evaluate• Defend • Argue • Debate • Investigation• Select • Decide • Panel • Verdict• Measure • Criticise • Report • Conclusion • Rank • Reject • Evaluation •Persuasive speech
  29. 29. Classroom Roles for EvaluatingTeacher roles Student roles• Clarifies • Judges• Accepts • Disputes• Guides • Compares • Critiques • Questions • Argues • Assesses • Decides • Selects • Justifies • Active participant
  30. 30. Evaluating: Potential Activities and Products• Write a letter to the editor• Prepare and conduct a debate• Prepare a list of criteria to judge…• Write a persuasive speech arguing for/against…• Make a booklet about five rules you see as important. Convince others.• Form a panel to discuss viewpoints on….• Write a letter to. ..advising on changes needed.• Write a half-yearly report.• Prepare a case to present your view about...• Complete a PMI on…• Evaluate the character’s actions in the story
  31. 31. Questions for Evaluating• Is there a better solution to...?• Judge the value of... What do you think about...?• Can you defend your position about...?• Do you think...is a good or bad thing?• How would you have handled...?• What changes to.. would you recommend?• Do you believe...? How would you feel if. ..?• How effective are. ..?• What are the consequences..?• What influence will....have on our lives?• What are the pros and cons of....?• Why is ....of value?• What are the alternatives?• Who will gain & who will loose?
  32. 32. CreatingThe learner creates new ideas and information using what has been previously learned. – Designing – Constructing – Planning – Producing – Inventing – Devising – MakingCan you generate new products, ideas, or ways of viewing things?
  33. 33. Creating cont’• Compose• Assemble • Formulate• Organise Putting together ideas• Invent • Improve or elements to develop• Compile • Act a original idea or• Forecast engage in creative• Devise • Predict thinking.• Propose• Construct • Produce• Plan• Prepare • Blend• Develop • Set up Products include:• Originate• • Film • Song Imagine • Devise• Generate • Story • Newspaper • Concoct • Project • Media product • Compile • Plan • Advertisement • New game • Painting
  34. 34. Classroom Roles for CreatingTeacher roles Student roles• Facilitates • Designs• Extends • Formulates• Reflects • Plans • Takes risks• Analyses • Modifies• Evaluates • Creates • Proposes • Active participant
  35. 35. Creating: Potential Activities and Products• Use the SCAMPER strategy to invent a new type of sports shoe• Invent a machine to do a specific task.• Design a robot to do your homework.• Create a new product. Give it a name and plan a marketing campaign.• Write about your feelings in relation to...• Write a TV show play, puppet show, role play, song or pantomime about..• Design a new monetary system• Develop a menu for a new restaurant using a variety of healthy foods• Design a record, book or magazine cover for...• Sell an idea• Devise a way to...• Make up a new language and use it in an example• Write a jingle to advertise a new product.
  36. 36. Questions for Creating• Can you design a...to...?• Can you see a possible solution to...?• If you had access to all resources, how would you deal with...?• Why dont you devise your own way to...?• What would happen if ...?• How many ways can you...?• Can you create new and unusual uses for...?• Can you develop a proposal which would...?
  37. 37. Importance of Bloom’s Taxonomy• Suitable for use with the entire class• Emphasis on certain levels for different children• Extend children’s thinking skills through emphasis on higher levels of the taxonomy (analysis, evaluation, creation)• Possible approaches with a class could be: – All children work through the remembering and understanding stages and then select at least one activity from each other level – All children work through first two levels and then select activities from any other level – Some children work at lower level while others work at higher levels – All children select activities from any level – Some activities are tagged “essential” while others are “optional” – A thinking process singled out for particular attention eg. Comparing, (done with all children, small group or individual) – Some children work through the lower levels and then design their own activities at the higher levels – All children write their own activities from the taxonomy (Black, 1988, p. 23).
  38. 38. How does it all fit together? Bloom’s Revised Taxonomy
  39. 39. A good teacher makes you think even when you don’t want to. (Fisher, 1998, Teaching Thinking)

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