Successfully reported this slideshow.
We use your LinkedIn profile and activity data to personalize ads and to show you more relevant ads. You can change your ad preferences anytime.

1996 Enterprise Architecture Praxis Presenation @ ZIFA

446 views

Published on

Enterprise Architecture state of practice presentation given at ZIFA in 1996

Published in: Business
  • Be the first to comment

1996 Enterprise Architecture Praxis Presenation @ ZIFA

  1. 1. Enterprise Architecture Theory and Practice Introducing the Architect’s paradigm into Microsoft Brian K. Seitz - Sr. Technologist WWIT Ian Chang - Sr. Technologist WWIT M ZIFA © 1996 ™ M
  2. 2. Introduction Enterprise Architecture The rational design of an Enterprise has been the hope and dream of CEOs, CIOs, Entrepreneurs, and managers since the advent of Frederick Taylor’s introduction of Scientific Management. However, it was not until recently were there sufficient tools to adequately describe and specify the richness that is Enterprise. This presentation will provide just a brief insight to the research being conducted in this area.
  3. 3. Agenda  Architect’s Paradigm examined  Enterprise Architecture  Microsoft experience  Conclusions and Lessons learned  Questions
  4. 4. Architect’s Paradigm examined  What is the purpose of Architecture ?  What is Architecture ?  Architectural Scope  Architectural Theory Architecture is a riddle, wrapped in an engima, hidden in a mystery...
  5. 5. Architecture’s Purpose is the management of complexity This is accomplished through: Reduction Organization
  6. 6. What is Architecture ? A set of rules that determine choice, the usage, and organization of elements to create a “Built Environment” Examples of these elements in Dwelling Architecture are: Space, Light and Texture Function Componentry
  7. 7. Drawings are not Architecture Architecture is expressed through architectonics Commonly called design Drawings represent the intentions ( plans ) of the design process. Commonly called “a design” Blueprints are one form of drawing Seitz’s Maxium -For differentiating Architecture and Design: If you can impliment more than one way, you are likely to have an Architecture. Corollary: If you can impliment in only one way, you have a Design.
  8. 8. Drawings are Design representations Drawings manage design complexity through reduction.
  9. 9. Built Environments require a family of drawings
  10. 10. Dwelling Architectural Scope Scale Time Product and Graphic Designers/ Artists Weeks Months Years Decades Regions Days EarthCitiesLandscapesStructuresInteriorProducts Generation Centuries Interior Designer Architects Landscape Architects Urban Planners Regional Planners Global Planners Span Granularity
  11. 11. Architectural Theory
  12. 12. Architectural Framework Research Methods Theory and models of the environment, people, and their interactions Decision Theory The Behavioral Sciences Substantive Procedural Positive Architectural Theory Professed substantive Professed procedural Normative Practice Building design Praxis content Building performance
  13. 13. Architectural Process Design Activity (Praxis)Client Architecture Theory Architectural Style Design Theory Design Instance Product
  14. 14. Design Praxis Brian K. Seitz 1996 M Activity Start Definition Analysis Synthesis Development Implementation (Owner) (Finance) Architect Contractor (Architect) Owner User (Architect) Owner Manufacturer Contractor (Architect) Contractor Manufacturer Subcontractor (Contractor) Subcontractor Manufacturer Architect (Contractor) Subcontractor Manufacturer Architect (Labor) Contractor Subcontractor Manufacturer(Key Role) Team Phase Source: Swinburne (1969 viaJon Lang 1987 Market Finalize Constructive Directive Role Shift Professional Management Finalize Construction Cost Time Schedule Economic Management Recycle & Modify Balance: Scope * Dollars * Time Re-examine Goal Definition Operation Need Cost Time Resources Role Shift Goals Limits Define Facility Objective Research & Investigate Operation s Program Spatial Program Human Program Environmental Program Think Determine Group Dynamics Determine Adjacency Finalize Design Concept Aesthetic Position Other Disciplines Write Design Directive Establish Performance Critieria Investigate Alternatives Subsystem Interlock Simulation Location Logistics (Owner) Architect User Maintainer Critic (Owner) Architect Contractor Subcontractor Manufacturer Verify Operating Costs Maintain & Operate Interior Environmental Comfort Perform Functions Exterior Environmental Reinforcement Construction Management Construction Logistics Labor (On-site) (Off-site) Construct & Equip Facility Role Shift Review Performance Criteria Judge Nonquantifiables Measure Quantifiables Establish Performance Profile Stop Evaluation
  15. 15. An Example of Design Praxis
  16. 16. Bubble chart
  17. 17. Preliminary Sketch
  18. 18. Dimensional Study
  19. 19. Completed Floor plan
  20. 20. Enterprise Architecture
  21. 21. Theory and models of the environment, people, and their interactions Decision Theory The Behavioral Sciences Research Methods Building design Praxis content Building performance Practice Professed substantive Professed procedural Normative Substantive Procedural Positive Who What Where When Why How Zachman ISA Owner Architect Contractor Manufacturer SubContractor Architectural Theory Brian K. Seitz 1996 M Activity Start Definition Analysis Synthesis Development Implementation (Owner) (Finance) Architect Contractor (Architect) Owner User (Architect) Owner Manufacturer Contractor (Architect) Contractor Manufacturer Subcontractor (Contractor) Subcontractor Manufacturer Architect (Contractor) Subcontractor Manufacturer Architect (Labor) Contractor Subcontractor Manufacturer(Key Role) Team Phase Source: Swinburne (1969 via Jon Lang 1987 Market Finalize Constructive Directive Role Shift Professional Management Finalize Construction Cost Time Schedule Economic Management Recycle & Modify Balance: Scope * Dollars * Time Re-examine Goal Definition Operation Need Cost Time Resources Role Shift Goals Limits Define Facility Objective Research & Investigate Operation s Program Spatial Program Human Program Environmental Program Think Determine Group Dynamics Determine Adjacency Finalize Design Concept Aesthetic Position Other Disciplines Write Design Directive Establish Performance Critieria Investigate Alternatives Subsystem Interlock Simulation Location Logistics (Owner) Architect User Maintainer Critic (Owner) Architect Contractor Subcontractor Manufacturer Verify Operating Costs Maintain & Operate Interior Environmental Comfort Perform Functions Exterior Environmental Reinforcement Construction Management Construction Logistics Labor (On-site) (Off-site) Construct & Equip Facility Role Shift Review Performance Criteria Judge Nonquantifiables Measure Quantifiables Establish Performance Profile Stop Evaluation
  22. 22. The Enterprise Sales Manufacturing Dealer Accounting Executive Management Customer Support Customer Is manifested as an organizational entity (an entire corporation, division, branch or department) having a business mission - that generates a need to share information. It is an association of resouces, ( fiscal, human, technological and intellectual), for the purpose of commerce.
  23. 23. Business Architecture Application Architecture Technology Architecture Microsoft Solutions Framework Information Architecture What is Enterprise Architecture ?  Describes the structure and dynamics of an Enterprise  Encapsulates the rules of selecting and organizing components into a purposeful whole.  Is multi-dimensional like Dwelling Architecture
  24. 24. Today’s Distributed Application Architectures Suppliers Distributors Enterprise MIS Customer s Users and Organization Units Network and Gateways Desktop Tools and Interfaces Network Servers, Mainframes, Data Feeds, ...
  25. 25. Products & Technologies Customer s Suppliers Distributors Corporate MIS Users and Business Units Windows NT Server Exchange & MAPI SQL Server & ODBC Backoffice & OLE Access & SQL Server Office & Visual Tools Windows NT Server & NetWare Services Windows 95 & Windows NT Workstation SNA Server, Mail gateways
  26. 26. Enterprise Architecture Scope Time A larger problem domain ... Domain Scale Time Program DesignersWeeks Months Years Decades Inter- Enterprise Days Industry/ Global EnterpriseBusiness Functions Business Processes ApplicationsTasks Generation Centuries Application Architect Business Systems Architects TBD Enterprise Architects TBD Global Planners Span Granularity
  27. 27. At Microsoft…..  Introduction of a Praxis  Organizational redesign
  28. 28. Introducing an Architectural Praxis Building Managing Planning MSF Program Management Development Testing User Education LogisticsProduct Management Communication
  29. 29. Enterprise Planning Perspectives …are only part of the solution Technology Architecture Business Architecture Application Architecture Information Architecture
  30. 30. The Essentials… • Architects - Team Model • A Framework • A Set of Plans • A Process Model
  31. 31. Sales Mfg. Adm. Finance IT Order Fulfillment Busines s Process Gain Leverage for the Enterprise Coordinated Enterprise/ Technical Architecture and Plans Architects Partnerships
  32. 32. The Architect  Capabilities and Skills  Identifies and reports poor alignment between the business and technology goals  Assures the “To-Be” Architecture aligns with business goals  Designs an infrastructure to support the business solutions  Has business and technical expertise and can influence key decision-makers  Understands the technology, information, and application needs of the enterprise  Owns the architectural processes  Evangelizes the enterprise business and technology objectives
  33. 33. MSF Team Model Development Testing User Education LogisticsProduct Management Program Management
  34. 34. Program Management Development Testing User Education Logistics Development Testing User Education LogisticsProduct Management The Architect Role Augments the MSF Team Model Program Management Testing User Education LogisticsProduct Management Program Management Enterprise Architecture Development Product Management
  35. 35. Business Architecture Application Architecture Technology Architecture Microsoft Solutions Framework Information Architecture Enterprise Architecture Framework Conceptual Design Physical Design Programming Models Database Design Technology Standards IT Principles and GuidelinesUser Procedures and Tasks Real World Constraints Scope of Impact on Current Systems Business Strategy Functional Model Critical Success Factors Logical Process Models Information and Process Needs Hardware Information Model Systems Models Application Model Technology Models Business Services Model Dynamic Models User Services Model Data Services Model Software
  36. 36. The Enterprise Architecture Planning Process  Control and coordination of change, distribution, and integration  Facilitates decision making  Managed as a milestone-based process  Results are measurable and visible to the organization  Required for successful deployment of distributed client/server technology
  37. 37. Major Components of Enterprise Architecture Planning Process Program and Project Management and Development Process Enterprise Architecture Design and Development Process Business and Financial Management Process Technical Principles, Guidelines, and Standards Financial and Business Models, Guidelines, and Standards Business Goals and Objectives Technical Objectives and Goals Coordination between these three processes is essential…
  38. 38. Enterprise Architecture Planning Process Model Deployment Vision/Scope Approved Master Plan Approved Action Plans Complete
  39. 39. Vision/Scope Approved  Develop Problem Statement (BPR, SWOT, Mission)  Evaluate Emerging Technology  Analyze As-Is Processes  Evaluate Options  Evaluate Current Projects Business Processes Business Objects Current Projects Critical Success Factors Business Processes Business Goals & Objectives Scope = High Priority Area Vision/Scope Approved
  40. 40. Master Plan Approved  Conduct Impact Analysis  Set Priorities  Communicate Program Vision and Objectives  Analyze As-Is Enterprise Architecture  Build the Master Plan AS-IS Enterprise Architecture Business Process Legacy Systems Business Processes Business Objects Focus areas Master Plan Approved
  41. 41. Action Plans Complete  Develop Action Plans  Develop Change Strategies  Develop Infrastructure Blueprints  Develop To-Be Enterprise Architecture Technology Deployment Plan Projects IT Initiatives IT Initiatives Business Initiatives To-Be Enterprise Architecture IT Strategic Plan Action Plans Complete
  42. 42. Release  Collect Feedback  Implement Plan  Evangelize  Implement First Use Technology Deployment Plan Projects IT Initiatives IT Initiatives Business Initiatives Deployment
  43. 43. Planning through building can take advantage of fluctuations in business and technology Identify changes to business processes Business Processes Business Objects Assessment of current programs & projects Business goals, strategies, objectives Identify priorities, risks, and impacts Critical Success Factors Business Procedures Business Goals & Objectives High Priority Area Technology Deployment Plan Projects IT Initiatives IT Initiatives Business Initiatives AS-IS Enterprise Architecture Business Process Legacy Systems Business Processes Business Objects Adjust Scope and gauge impact on applications and infrastructure To-Be Enterprise Architecture IT Strategic Plan Coordinate legacy systems shutdown and the introduction of new business solutions I IV III II Planning Cycle
  44. 44. General Principles  Build a vision for the future  Build the architecture incrementally  Focus on common infrastructures  Utilize Project Management desciplines in Architecture Projects  Staff with the right level of expertise  Document, model, and share results  Involve customers through out the process
  45. 45. Organizational redesign The organizational models chosen for IT Organizations must have give them the ability to : a) develop leveraged partnerships with the business units b) respond rapidly to changes in the business environment
  46. 46. 48 The Federation Model A new paradigm for IT governance Corporate ITBusiness Units Business Units Business Units Business Units Corporate IT Business Unit Business UnitBusiness Unit Business Unit Move Ownership, Responsibility, Autonomy, and Accountability for Business Applications to the Business Units
  47. 47. Conclusions and Lessons learned  For both organization and architectural team  The simplicity and elegance of architecture can be deceiving Communications Learning is essential  Extremely important  Extremely difficult Rapid shallow cycles are best
  48. 48. Issues on the Horizon  What’s in, what’s out ?  What does it mean ?  Where can I find…  Semantic integration  Inventory control Ontological management and control PS, If you plan on going Object Oriented your going to need an Ontology management system real bad!
  49. 49. Where to get more information  Forth coming White Paper “Architect’ Office”  Microsoft Consulting Services, Microsoft Executive Briefing Center
  50. 50. Questions ? Enterprise Architecture Experiences
  51. 51.

×