Significant (Language) Learning Experiences

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Presented at PAC@PALT2013 in Cebu, Philippines (Dec. 5-7, 2013). Ideas on how Fink's Taxonomy of Significant Learning can be used in content-focused language programs.

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Significant (Language) Learning Experiences

  1. 1. Significant (Language) Learning Experiences Brent A. Jones Konan University, Hirao School of Management
  2. 2. Where do you start when planning a new course?
  3. 3. Integrated Course Design (Adopted from Fink, 2003) Learning Goals Feedback and Assessment Teaching and Learning Activities
  4. 4. Bloom’s Taxonomy?
  5. 5. Anderson & Krathwohl, 2001
  6. 6. Six Categories of SL 1. Foundational Knowledge Basic understanding Necessary for other kinds of learning 2. Application Knowledge and how it’s applied Skills 3. Integration • Making connections (other courses, work, life) Power: the whole - more than the sum of the parts
  7. 7. Six Categories of SL 4. Human Dimension Human significance of topic Learning about self, others 5. Caring Caring engenders energy for learning Nothing significant happens without caring 6. Learning How to Learn • Learning more effectively Life-long learning
  8. 8. What the the six categories? F _____________ K _____________ A _____________ I _____________ H _____________ D _____________ C _____________ L _____________ how to L _____________
  9. 9. Creating SLEs Learning Goals Feedback and Assessment Teaching and Learning Activities
  10. 10. Learning Goals Backward Design What’s important now & years after the course? What should students do in the course to succeed?
  11. 11. Feedback and Assessment Forward Looking Assessment Imagine students in a situation where they would use the knowledge and/or skills. Focus learning on realistic, meaningful tasks.
  12. 12. Instructional Alignment S.A. Cohen (1987) coined the term instructional alignment, i.e. the degree to which intended outcomes, instructional processes and instructional assessment match with efforts to produce the outcomes.
  13. 13. Alignment Learning Outcomes Students will be able to: (1) (2) (3) Assessment Method As measured by: (1) (2) (3)
  14. 14. Teaching and Learning Activities Doing Experience Direct: Real doing, in authentic settings Indirect: case studies, simulations, … Observing Experience Direct: seeing the phenomena to be observed Indirect: stories, film, …
  15. 15. Approaches to Instruction Check your handout (Appendix 1) How many of these do you use?
  16. 16. Authentic Learning Activities Check your handout (Appendix 2) Which ones are important to you?
  17. 17. Te xt KONAN CUBE ENGLISH LANGUAGE PROGRAM
  18. 18. REQUIRED ENGLISH COURSES Semester One Semester Two Semester Three Global Challenges (twice a week) American Studies (twice a week) European Studies Speech & Discussion (twice a week) Discussion & Debate (twice a week) Japan Studies CUBE English I CUBE English II Business Communication TOEIC Preparation
  19. 19. ELECTIVES (SEMESTERS 4 - 8) Regional Studies Asian Neighbors, Cultural Look at Spain Studies in Literature The Graphic Novel, Sports in Literature Business Skills II Advanced Business, The Auto Industry Media Studies News & the Media, Web 2.0, Film Studies Liberal Arts Knowledge History of European Thought, Socratic Dialogs Communication Skills I Language & Culture of Spain, Cross-Cultural Communication Cross Disciplinary Sustainable Living
  20. 20. CBI & CLIL . . . AND MANY, MANY MORE • content-based language instruction • content and language integrated learning • content-focused language learning • enhanced language learning • teaching language through content • immersion
  21. 21. WHAT ARE WE TALKING ABOUT? USE OF SUBJECT MATTER AS A VEHICLE (OR FRAMEWORK) FOR LANGUAGE TEACHING/LEARNING
  22. 22. Types of CBI Adjunct Model Sheltered Model Theme-Based Model
  23. 23. Japan Studies Society & Culture Business & The Economy The Environment Government & Politics
  24. 24. LESSONS LEARNED • Involve students in the choice of topics and activities. • Avoid the Double Whammy. • Keep the focus on language for thinking and school learning. • Offer scaffolding when and where it is needed.
  25. 25. KEY CONCEPTS • Learning Outcomes (include student voice) • Emphasis on High Frequency Vocabulary • Lots of Comprehensible Input • Reading-Writing Connection (Genre) • “Can Do” Statements • Relevance • Focus on Content (with practice on all 4 skills) • Blended Learning (Flipped Classroom) • Scaffolding (just in time, just enough)
  26. 26. Good courses are courses that … Challenge students to significant kinds of learning. Use active forms of learning. Have teachers who care about the subject, their students, and about teaching and learning. Have teachers who interact well with students. Have a good system of feedback, assessment, and grading. L. D. Fink
  27. 27. www.brentjones.c om

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