Hiroshima JALT 2013 - Content Based Instruction

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Content-Focused Language Instruction. Outline of content-focused approaches with examples drawn from the content-based English language program at Konan University, Hirao School of Management.

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Hiroshima JALT 2013 - Content Based Instruction

  1. 1. http://tinyurl.com/bjones-cbi-handout CONTENT-FOCUSED LANGUAGE INSTRUCTION BRENT A. JONES KONAN UNIVERSITY, HIRAO SCHOOL OF MANAGEMENT
  2. 2. KONAN CUBE ENGLISH LANGUAGE PROGRAM
  3. 3. GOALS & AIMS (PRE-2009) • internationally-minded citizens • integrate English, liberal arts and other courses • communicative competence and confidence • creativity and a sense of curiosity • practical skills • global literacy • critical thinking • studying in English • reading/writing/presentation
  4. 4. REQUIRED ENGLISH COURSES Semester One Semester Two Semester Three Global Challenges (twice a week) American Studies (twice a week) European Studies Speech & Discussion (twice a week) Discussion & Debate (twice a week) Japan Studies CUBE English II Business Communication CUBE English I TOEIC Preparation
  5. 5. ELECTIVES (SEMESTERS 4 - 8) Regional Studies Asian Neighbors, Cultural Look at Spain Studies in Literature The Graphic Novel, Sports in Literature Business Skills II Advanced Business, The Auto Industry Media Studies News & the Media, Web 2.0, Film Studies Liberal Arts Knowledge History of European Thought, Socratic Dialogs Communication Skills I Language & Culture of Spain, CrossCultural Communication Cross Disciplinary Sustainable Living
  6. 6. CBI & CLIL . . . AND MANY, MANY MORE • content-based language instruction • content and language integrated learning • content-focused language learning • enhanced language learning • teaching language through content • immersion
  7. 7. WHAT ARE WE TALKING ABOUT? USE OF SUBJECT MATTER AS A VEHICLE (OR FRAMEWORK) FOR LANGUAGE TEACHING/LEARNING
  8. 8. BENEFITS (OR PURPOSE) • Learning “authentic” language • Exposure to lots of language • Language learning as a bi-product of academic endeavours • Useful language embedded in relevant, meaningful contexts • Increased intrinsic motivation
  9. 9. Students will not be motivated to learn unless they regard the material they are taught as worth learning. Dörnyei, 2001
  10. 10. CREATING SLES • Learning Goals • Feedback & Assessment • Learning & Teaching Activities SLEs = Significant Learning Experiences
  11. 11. MODULES • Society & Culture • Business & The Economy • The Environment • Government & Politics
  12. 12. SOCIETY & CULTURE
  13. 13. SHADOWING
  14. 14. DICTATION & DICTOGLOSS
  15. 15. BUSINESS & THE ECONOMY
  16. 16. CONVERGENT & DIVERGENT TASKS
  17. 17. THE ENVIRONMENT
  18. 18. GENRE WRITING & THE READING/WRITING CONNECTION
  19. 19. GOVERNMENT & POLITICS
  20. 20. PEER-ASSESSED INTERVIEWS
  21. 21. SCAFFOLDING
  22. 22. TYPES OF CBI • Adjunct Model • Sheltered Model • Theme-based Model
  23. 23. Alternative models of CLIL Soft CLIL Type of CLIL Time Context Language- one class per Some subject topics taught led week during a language course Subject-led (modular) Hard CLIL 15 classes per term Subject-led approx. 50% (partial of immersion curriculum Schools or teachers choose parts of the subject syllabus to teach in target language Half of subject curriculum taught in target language.
  24. 24. MORE ACRONYMS? • Problem-Based Learning (PBL) • Project-Based Learning (PBL) • Task-Based Learning (TBL)
  25. 25. LESSONS LEARNED • Involve students in the choice of topics and activities. • Avoid the Double Whammy. • Keep the focus on language for thinking and school learning. • Offer scaffolding when and where it is needed.
  26. 26. CONSIDERATIONS • Group Learning Trajectory / Individual Learning Path
  27. 27. BACKWARD DESIGN & FORWARD ASSESSMENT • Backward Design • What’s important now and years after the course? • What should students do in the course to succeed? • Forward Assessment • Imagine students in a situation where they would use the knowledge and/or skills. • Focus the learning on realistic, meaningful tasks.
  28. 28. A HOLISTIC VIEW OF ACTIVE LEARNING Experiences - Doing, Observing - Actual, simulated - “Rich learning experiences Info and Ideas - Primary/secondary - Accessing them in class, out-of-class, online Fink, 2003 Reflecting - On what one is learning and how one is learning - Alone and with others
  29. 29. KEY CONCEPTS - REVIEW • Learning Outcomes (include student voice) • Emphasis on High Frequency Vocabulary • Lots of Comprehensible Input • Reading-Writing Connection (Genre) • “Can Do” Statements • Relevance • Focus on Content (with practice on all 4 skills) • Blended Learning (Flipped Classroom) • Scaffolding (just in time, just enough)
  30. 30. GOOD COURSES ARE COURSES THAT . . . • challenge students to significant kinds of learning • use active forms of learning • have teachers who care about the subject, their students, and teaching and learning • have teachers who interact well with students • have a good system for feedback, assessment and grading L. Dee Fink
  31. 31. WWW.BRENTJONES.COM
  32. 32. Cognitive Load Theory
  33. 33. POSITIVES • Achieving program goals • High and appropriate expectations • Student satisfaction • Year by year improvements • Gaining recognition as innovative • Increased use of English O-Zone
  34. 34. CHALLENGES • Monitoring student progress • Wide ability/motivation/expectation gaps • Quality control • Stuck in outdated model • Low “buy in” (students, faculty, staff)
  35. 35. FRAMEWORK FOR IMPROVEMENTS • Accreditation process (external accountability) • How to better serve students (internal) • 21st century skills • Relevance • Societal needs • Catch their imagination (inspiration)
  36. 36. One-Step Minimum per YEAR ACTFL Proficiency Guidelines CEFR “Can Do” Statements / iBT range / TOEIC range
  37. 37. LEARNING OBJECTIVES • Cognitive objectives: • • Affective objectives: • • What do you want your graduates to know? What do you want your graduates to think or care about? Behavioral objectives: • What do you want your graduates to be able to do?
  38. 38. LEARNING OBJECTIVES • Mastery objectives are typically concerned with the minimum performance essentials – those learning tasks/skills that must be mastered before moving on to the next level of instruction. • Developmental objectives are concerned with more complex learning outcomes – those learning tasks on which students can be expected to demonstrate varying degrees of progress.
  39. 39. GLOBAL CHALLENGES • Schema Building • Reading/Writing Connection • Stories (non-fiction) • Case Studies • Problem-Based Learning • Critical Thinking • Self Awareness • Cause/Effect/Links • Vocabulary Building • Research Skills • Discussion/Presentation
  40. 40. SPEECH & DISCUSSION • Physical Message • Body/Voice • Visual Message • Story Message • Confidence Building • Logical Thinking • Transitions • Speech Writing • Types of Speech/Discussion • Supporting Ideas • Extemporaneous/Impromptu Speaking
  41. 41. CUBE ENGLISH I & II • • • • • • • • • • • • Multimodal input Training the ear Vocabulary building Ambiguity tolerance Foundation for TOEIC Listening shower Authentic material Graded tasks Blended learning Schema building Self access/autonomy Strategies & sub-skills
  42. 42. AMERICAN STUDIES • Schema Building • Blended Learning • Modules • History/Geography • Society/Culture • Government/Politics • Research Project • American Fair • Reading/Writing Connection • Learning Portfolio • Genre Writing

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