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Dynamic Valuation

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Dynamic Valuation

  1. 1. DynamicValuation:What’s In A Name?<br />RESOLVING THE PRAGMATIST AND INNOVATOR TENSION<br />Innovations in programs, services, products, systems or organizational culture have two things in common – they involve considerable investment and their “progress” is often not linear, requiring frequent adjustment and tenacity. These dynamics create unhealthy but understandable tensions between the two constituencies of any evaluation. The “pragmatists” (managers, “funders” and other key stakeholders who are responsible for “return on investment” ) are concerned with “taking stock”, measuring progress, or in some way assessing “whether we are on track”. The “innovators” (those most closely connected to the ideation, implementation and commercialization of the innovation work) are focused on understanding where the innovation is working and how it can be “managed and nurtured” to take it to the next level of success. Unfortunately, traditional or “classical evaluation” (done at the “end” of the project, focused only on numbers and with a dichotomous view) is too slow, too late, too lopsided and too energy draining to be of any real use to either group. Pragmatists and Innovators alike are calling for innovation in how and when and what we evaluate <br /> <br />BUSINESS AS UNUSUAL: HOW IS DYNAMIC EVALUATION DIFFERENT?<br /> <br />Dynamic Evaluation is a process for evaluating results, outcomes, and progress-to-date that enables you to do the following:<br />Evaluate as you go (“why wait?”)<br /><ul><li>Use anecdotal evidence to spot emerging trends and patterns
  2. 2. Adjust and recalibrate a journey, project, or initiative before you go off track
  3. 3. Keep innovators and pragmatists aligned (i.e. project champions and Finance, Accounting, etc.)
  4. 4. Broaden the meaning of “evidence-based” to include early warnings, predictive alerts, and promising early-stage innovations
  5. 5. Use evaluation to generate information that is useful, right away, for improvements in  practice
  6. 6. Generate energy, momentum, and enthusiasm for the next stages, by recognizing what’s working and building forward, rather than highlighting what’s not and working backwards
  7. 7. Build the system’s “connective tissue” - to provide the stretch and resilience needed to support innovation, change or transformation</li></ul>Bernard J Mohr & Tom Bigda-Peyton 2009<br />
  8. 8. Evaluation for Innovation?: An Important Choice<br />Start Here<br />Innovation for Transformation<br />Bernard J Mohr & Tom Bigda-Peyton 2009<br />

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