Successfully reported this slideshow.
We use your LinkedIn profile and activity data to personalize ads and to show you more relevant ads. You can change your ad preferences anytime.

Y in the Workplace

Y in the Workplace will be of interest to anyone who works with or manages people born between 1980 and 2000, the members of Gen Y.

Its goal is to help readers recognize and take advantage of Gen Y’s special strengths, and to mentor them into effective leaders for tomorrow.

  • Login to see the comments

Y in the Workplace

  1. 1. Y IN THE WORKPLACE Managing The ‘Me First’ Generation AUTHOR: Nicole A Lipkin, PsyD, MBA, and April J. Perrymore, PsyD PUBLISHER: Career Press DATE OF PUBLICATION: 2009 224 pages
  2. 2. Y In The Workplace By Nicole A. Lipkin and April J. Perrymore FEATURES OF THE BOOK Y in the Workplace will be of interest to anyone who works with or manages people born between 1980 and 2000, the members of Gen Y. Its goal is to help readers recognize and take advantage of Gen Y’s special strengths, and to mentor them into effective leaders for tomorrow.
  3. 3. Y In The Workplace By Nicole A. Lipkin and April J. Perrymore THE BIG IDEA Gen Y brings both advantages and challenges to the workplace. The unique culture into which they were born has affected how they are motivated and communicate, their work ethic and approach to office politics, and their moods and relationships. Managers can help Gen Yers capitalize on their strengths, minimize weaknesses, and groom them for eventual leadership.
  4. 4. Y In The Workplace By Nicole A. Lipkin and April J. Perrymore INTRODUCTION Like it or not, Generation Y (Gen Y) is entering the workplace, and their numbers are too big to ignore. Sporting nose rings and spurning panty hose, listening to iPods and continuously text messaging, the generation born between 1980 and 2000 is stunning supervisors and appalling coworkers while at the same time coming up with brilliant, insightful ideas and solutions that turn the workplace and the world upside down.
  5. 5. Y In The Workplace By Nicole A. Lipkin and April J. Perrymore GEN Y AND THE WORKPLACE: AN OVERVIEW As the first generation to grow up with electronics, Gen Yers are “native speakers of electronics.” They know that a world of information is a mouse-click away, as well as how to get that information and apply it. They have grown up with people of varying backgrounds and abilities, and are tolerant of differences and open to influences from unlikely sources. They form e- friendships that cross barriers of race, gender, age, socioeconomics (to a certain extent), time zones, continents and oceans. Theirs is a global community, and they are more motivated than previous generations by altruism.
  6. 6. Y In The Workplace By Nicole A. Lipkin and April J. Perrymore MANAGING GEN Y Where Did They Come From? According to the authors, Gen Y has come from us: overprotective, overindulgent, overworked parents who raised latchkey children – or rather, who relied on electronic babysitters such as television or computers. They come from our social activism, which attempted to correct injustices by insisting that schools teach that everyone is special, include learners of all levels in the same classroom, not permit children to fail, and hand out awards even to those who finish last in a race.
  7. 7. Y In The Workplace By Nicole A. Lipkin and April J. Perrymore MANAGING GEN Y Parents Gen Y employees may come complete with a “helicopter parent,” that is, a parent who hovers. Incredibly, parents have actually dropped off resumes, scheduled interviews and stepped in to advocate for their adult offspring. Some have even come along for the job interview! Because Gen Y has been so shielded from pain and other consequences of their mistakes, their ability to make decisions and solve problems is severely stunted; their lack of experience in dealing alone with adversity makes everything a crisis, and they may lack autonomy and accountability.
  8. 8. Y In The Workplace By Nicole A. Lipkin and April J. Perrymore MANAGING GEN Y Motivation It is critically important for employers of Gen Yers to look beyond behavior and understand what is driving it. This generation has been taught to thrive on external motivation – after all, schools give rewards just for showing up. They have a genuine need for praise, tangible rewards, and feedback at every step. Unlike earlier generations, they must learn in adulthood rather than in childhood to develop internal motivation. Managers willing to help with this process will have more independent, self-reliant, and successful employees.
  9. 9. Y In The Workplace By Nicole A. Lipkin and April J. Perrymore MANAGING GEN Y Communication Perhaps the most jarring of Gen Y’s workplace behaviors is their connectedness. They are – they expect to be – in constant communication with their friends by phone, by e-mail, by instant messaging, and by text messages. They are the first digital generation, and those who preceded them must accept that the way we communicate has changed.
  10. 10. Y In The Workplace By Nicole A. Lipkin and April J. Perrymore MANAGING GEN Y Work Ethic Gen Y is a generation of multitaskers. They have grown up listening to music on their iPods while carrying on several online communications while doing their work. Although older generations interpret this as reflecting a poor work ethic, they view this as normal behavior.
  11. 11. Y In The Workplace By Nicole A. Lipkin and April J. Perrymore MANAGING GEN Y Relationships What Gen Y may lack in company loyalty, they more than make up for in personal loyalty to bosses, coworkers, family and friends. They expect to be in near-constant communication with all of them, work obligations notwithstanding. Luckily, this means that they expect and want to have solid relationships with those they work with and for; they prefer working together on shared goals, making them good team players.
  12. 12. Y In The Workplace By Nicole A. Lipkin and April J. Perrymore MANAGING GEN Y Moods Gen Y has been taught that people should be open about their feelings, and so they are, often disconcertingly so. In addition, mental illnesses and disorders have been destigmatized, and those who suffer from them are now medicated and covered under the Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA.) Moreover, for this generation adolescence appears to have been extended. The necessity of earning a college degree (and sometimes a graduate degree or two as well) has many Gen Y members still making lifestyle and career choices at an age when Baby Boomers had bought a house and started a family.
  13. 13. Y In The Workplace By Nicole A. Lipkin and April J. Perrymore MANAGING GEN Y Office Politics Workers and managers who have learned to navigate office politics by “playing the game” are often disconcerted by Gen Yers, who do not play by the rules, whether by choice or from ignorance. Insofar as they are aware of corporate politics, they see it as archaic and pointless. Like every generation, what they believe about the workplace has been shaped by the culture that shaped them: egalitarian, casual, impatient, but also well-informed and highly altruistic. They expect their values to be reflected at work.
  14. 14. Y In The Workplace By Nicole A. Lipkin and April J. Perrymore ONE LAST WORD Generation Y, like each generation before it, presents specific challenges in the workplace. Its members may disguise shaky self-esteem behind a façade of self-inflation; they may lack emotional intelligence skills that previous generations could take for granted in new employees; they dream big dreams but often skip the reality check; they have grown up with instant feedback, instant gratification, and rewards for any level of performance, including for just showing up. They are unused to taking blame, admitting mistakes, coping with disappointments. Their casual dress and language, as well as their candor, shock their elders; their elders’ shock, in turn, mystifies them.
  15. 15. Y In The Workplace By Nicole A. Lipkin and April J. Perrymore ONE LAST WORD Generation Y, like each generation before it, presents specific challenges in the workplace. Its members may disguise shaky self-esteem behind a façade of self-inflation; they may lack emotional intelligence skills that previous generations could take for granted in new employees; they dream big dreams but often skip the reality check; they have grown up with instant feedback, instant gratification, and rewards for any level of performance, including for just showing up. They are unused to taking blame, admitting mistakes, coping with disappointments. Their casual dress and language, as well as their candor, shock their elders; their elders’ shock, in turn, mystifies them.
  16. 16. Y In The Workplace By Nicole A. Lipkin and April J. Perrymore ONE LAST WORD However, Generation Y has much to offer in the workplace. They are unafraid to take risks, to try new things, and to say what they think. They are natural team players, intensely loyal to parents and friends, to bosses and colleagues. They are technologically adept, used to innovative developments and ready to embrace new ideas and tools for communication, and proficient multitaskers. Because their social and ecological awareness spurs them to altruism, they prod their companies in the same direction. They are aware of their own emotional states, express them openly, and are willing to ask for the help and guidance they need.
  17. 17. Y In The Workplace By Nicole A. Lipkin and April J. Perrymore ONE LAST WORD There are 73 to 75 million of them, and they will one day be in charge. The best action that any executive, at any level, can take is to assure them that they will lead and lead well, and to mentor them, whether through a formal program of voluntary mentoring, or informally by taking them under a wing. The future is theirs; the future is them.
  18. 18. Y In The Workplace By Nicole A. Lipkin and April J. Perrymore BusinessSummaries.com is a business book Summaries service. Every week, it sends out to subscribers a 9- to 12-page summary of a best-selling business book chosen from among the hundreds of books printed out in the United States. For more information, please go to http://www.bizsum.com. ABOUT BUSINESSSUMMARIES

×