T M 11 G M O (4)

437 views

Published on

0 Comments
0 Likes
Statistics
Notes
  • Be the first to comment

  • Be the first to like this

No Downloads
Views
Total views
437
On SlideShare
0
From Embeds
0
Number of Embeds
2
Actions
Shares
0
Downloads
2
Comments
0
Likes
0
Embeds 0
No embeds

No notes for slide
  • Keywords: Africa; food security; globalisation; GM; green revolution; India; justice; partnership; population; poverty Summary The world's population at the start of the 21 st century is about 6 billion. Of these, about 1 billion live in poverty and do not enjoy food security, despite the fact the world produces more than enough food. In the mid-21 st century, population is predicted to outstrip food production. What is needed is a ‘doubly green’ revolution to produce affordable food for the whole population of the world. Biotechnology, including the use of GM crops, could play a role in this. More GM research must be directed at the needs of less-developed countries. However, the commercial power in crop GM technology lies with a small number of large and powerful companies. This opens the way for exploitation of less-developed countries by the richer nations, on a purely commercial basis. A partnership approach between the private sector in developed countries and publicly or charitably funded research organisations is a possible way forward.
  • T M 11 G M O (4)

    1. 1. Part III : Ethical Issues in Agriculture and Food Production
    2. 2. Chapter 11. Crop Biotechnology and Developing Countries
    3. 3. Keywords: Africa; food security; globalisation; GM; green revolution; India; justice; partnership; population; poverty Chapter 11. Crop Biotechnology and Developing Countries
    4. 4. The world's population at the start of the 21 st century is about 6 billion. Chapter 11. Crop Biotechnology and Developing Countries
    5. 5. Of these, about 1 billion live in poverty and do not enjoy food security, despite the fact the world produces more than enough food. In the mid-21 st century, population is predicted to outstrip food production. Chapter 11. Crop Biotechnology and Developing Countries
    6. 6. What is needed is a ‘doubly green’ revolution to produce affordable food for the whole population of the world. Chapter 11. Crop Biotechnology and Developing Countries
    7. 7. Biotechnology, including the use of GM crops, could play a role in this. More GM research must be directed at the needs of less-developed countries. Chapter 11. Crop Biotechnology and Developing Countries
    8. 8. However, the commercial power in crop GM technology lies with a small number of large and powerful companies. Chapter 11. Crop Biotechnology and Developing Countries
    9. 9. This opens the way for exploitation of less-developed countries by the richer nations, on a purely commercial basis. Chapter 11. Crop Biotechnology and Developing Countries
    10. 10. A partnership approach between the private sector in developed countries and publicly or charitably funded research organisations is a possible way forward. Chapter 11. Crop Biotechnology and Developing Countries

    ×