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Precious Phiri: "Holistic Management in Practice: The Ecological, Economic, and Social Benefits"

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Precious Phiri: "Holistic Management in Practice: The Ecological, Economic, and Social Benefits"

  1. 1. Holistic Management: In PracticeBy Precious Phiri
  2. 2. 10/23/15
  3. 3. 10/23/15 5 From across this patch looks covered, but in essence its bare and capped
  4. 4. 10/23/15 6 Totally bare and capped land
  5. 5. 10/23/15 7
  6. 6. Back Ground
  7. 7. DEGRADED AND FOREST AREAS OF ZIMBABWE 10/23/15 10
  8. 8. Agric Regions 10/23/15 11
  9. 9. Agro-ecological zones of Zimbabwe Natural Region Area (km-2 ) Rainfall (mm yr- 1 ) Farming system I 7 000 >1 000 Specialized and diversified farming II 58 600 750 – 1 000 Intensive farming III 72 900 650 - 800 Semi-intensive farming IV 147 800 450 - 650 Semi-extensive farming V 104 400 <450 Extensive farming12
  10. 10. Solutions
  11. 11. What is Holistic Management? • DECISION making framework offering: • low cost, • high ecology solutions to food security, biodiversity loss, desertification and climate change
  12. 12. The First Insight: Manage as a whole 17 State, Nation, Universe, Etc. Local Community Farming Cooperative Work Family Other whole Other whole Other whole You
  13. 13. The Second Insight: The brittleness scale
  14. 14. The Third Insight: the predator- prey connection to the land
  15. 15. The Fourth Insight: Plant recovery time (timing is everything)
  16. 16. 10/23/15
  17. 17. 22
  18. 18. 10/23/15
  19. 19. 10/23/15 24 Community Action Cycle Act Together Evaluate Together Explore Land Restoration Issues & Set Priorities Plan Together Prepare to Mobilize Prepare to Scale Up Organize the Community for Action Program Team Community Community outreach
  20. 20. Benefits
  21. 21. Training and knowledge sharing
  22. 22. Progressive Communities 10/23/15
  23. 23. 10/23/15 28
  24. 24. Grazing planning
  25. 25. 10/23/15 30
  26. 26. 10/23/15 31
  27. 27. 10/23/15 33
  28. 28. 10/23/15 34 Herding together helps save livestock from snares
  29. 29. The New Face of Climate Heroes
  30. 30. Tools used 10/23/15 36
  31. 31. 10/23/15 37 Mobile Kraals in cropfields
  32. 32. 10/23/15
  33. 33. 10/23/15 Cropfield in Chikomba District
  34. 34. 10/23/15
  35. 35. 10/23/15
  36. 36. Conventional Plough farming Animal impacted field 380ml rain 2 months and 5 months worth of Food!
  37. 37. 45 Less stress animal handling improves animal behaviour Livestock increase -71% in Chezya community
  38. 38. Healing the Land using overnight kraals
  39. 39. The Earth Doctor- Dung Beetle 10/23/15
  40. 40. 10/23/15 Namibia Site Sept 2004 Sept 2006
  41. 41. 2006
  42. 42. Animal Impact
  43. 43. 10/23/15 Elbow 2009
  44. 44. 10/23/15 Very hard to recognise!
  45. 45. 10/23/15 53
  46. 46. 2004 2005 2006 2007
  47. 47. Neighboring community river- same day
  48. 48. 2006 2011 Sianyanga Community: Paddock 3
  49. 49. Revived Rangelands
  50. 50. Google Digital Globe • Geo Eye • Cnes / Spot Image New Surface Water in Dry Season 1.5 Km / 30 ft elev
  51. 51. 10/23/15 59
  52. 52. 10/23/15 60
  53. 53. Sizinda River
  54. 54. 10/23/15
  55. 55. 10/23/15 RSA Grazing Land Mafuta, March- 2013 Mafuta, March - 2014
  56. 56. From this To This
  57. 57. 10/23/15

Editor's Notes

  • Recognizing the essential role that animals play to grassland health, and new practice called Holistic Management is using livestock as a proxy for wild herds. What are the specifics?
  • The concept of holism tells us that each of us is a whole unto ourselves. And we are, in turn, part of other wholes.
    You could start at the tiniest microscopic level—a bacteria that exists within your body is part of a whole—and expand out to our families, or farms and business, that are part of a community in a state, province or region of a country on the planet earth.
    No whole stands alone, independent of others—many wholes, in fact, overlap.
    As part of the decision making process, we need to think about the various wholes we are associated with:
    think about the people who are involved in making decisions, and the people who influence decisions.
    clarify what resources are available to us (land, equipment, clients, etc.), and
    know what money we have access to.
    This step we refer to as defining the whole under management
    Exercise:Each of us represents a whole that is part of many other wholes. Using the &amp;quot;wholes within wholes&amp;quot; figure on page 1 of your guide, diagram or write out what are some of the wholes you are part of and connected to.
  • And finally, the takeaway I am most encouraged by is that this innovation presents a new face of climate heroes. People who are actually making a difference, restoring land and putting carbon in the ground. Village herders, doing what they’ve always done, only now doing it in a way that is restorative and offers promise for our future.
    And finally, meet the climate heroes of tomorrow. Village herders, doing what they’ve always done, only doing it in a way that is restorative.
    is restorative, and provides promise for reversing global warming.
    restoring grasslands and reversing global warming by putting carbon in the soil, we it wants to be.
    In addition to politicians, technologist, and business people, we can now bring into the fold common people, village herders, doing what they have already done, but now doing it in a way that’s restorative.
  • 202269008
  • Lets quickly see this again. The only tool used in this restoration effort was livestock. No irrigation. No seeding. No artificial fertilizer. No fossil fuels. No change in rainfall.
    In five years there is reversal of desertification.
  • Now let’s look at a river example. This is an aerial view. The blue star toward the bottom is the historic high water point for the river during the dry season, and elephants bathed in there. But after 9 years of restoring the land through changed livestock management, there is now year round surface water 1.5 kilometers upstream. These new pools provide watering points for the cattle and the ranch no longer runs the water pumps in the dry season.
    Imagery 2012 Cnes/Spot Image,DigitalGlobe, GeoEye, Map data 2012 Google
  • Here’s how it looks from the ground. We are driving upstream with the river on our left.
  • Here’s new surface water, 1.5km upstream from the previous dry season high water point.

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