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PartnershipsSonia WallmanExecutive Director, NBC2January 13, 2012 – Bio-Link Conference
PartnershipsCommunity colleges traditionally have been tasked tosupport local industry by providing apt education andtrain...
NBC2 Partnerships Case Study          12 partners were interviewed by Dr. Joanna Kile,                        their conclu...
NBC2 Biomanufacturing                    Products   GBC Laboratory Manual generic and customized   Introduction to Bioma...
Virtual Biomanufacturing Production
Panelists Introduction Danny Kainer from Lonestar Community  College in Houston, TX Bruce Van Dyke from Quincy College i...
A thumbnail sketch of                           our college system• Opened in 1973 (as North Harris College) with an   enr...
My personal                                 favorite…          LSC-Montgomery• >13,000 students• Only biotechnology progra...
SECOND YEAR LSCBI – AAS & ATC     Programs
LSCBI - Graduates
LSCBI – Outreach
LSCBI Partners (a   sampling)
Taking ourBiotechnology Institute  in a New Direction
On Campus Research                                                                       Opportunities                1. A...
Received Generous Donations  & Loans from local algae  entrepreneurs (Thanks!)
Algal Culture
PBR Construction   (lab scale)
PBR Construction   (mid-scale)
The “Tea Cup” PBR
PBR Construction   (mid-scale)
PBR Construction(commercial scale)
Inoculation
Flow Cytometry (with   a visual twist!)
Flow Cam Project –                             Contamination DetectionContamination detection (wow – that Chlorella vulgar...
Flow Cam Project –       Cell Count Validation
Flow Cam Project –       NileRed Lipid Analysis http://omlc.ogi.edu/spectra/PhotochemCAD/html/nilered.html
Algal Nutraceuticals
WVO-to-Biodiesel Project
WVO-to-                       Biodiesel                        Project             Lower            ToxicityFeedstock     ...
WVO-to-Biodiesel   Project
Biodiesel Project -   Biorefinery
Biorefinery    http://oilgae.com/includes/site_img/origin_oil.jpg
WVO-to-Biodiesel   Project
MFCs:                          Electricity From                                Mud!http://i.treehugger.com/images/2007/10/...
Microbial Fuel Cell     Project
Molecular Biology &Microbial Fuel Cells?
WaterBioremediation
Water Remediation     Project
Water Remediation     Project
Bionanotechnology?
Nanotech & Algae?
Nanotechnology &Microbial Fuel Cells?
Nanotechnology &Microbial Fuel Cells?
Nanotechnology &Microbial Fuel Cells?
Nanotechnology &            Water Remediation?           “Nano Rust”(http://www.gizmag.com/go/6448/)
Thanks for your attention!
STARTING A BIOTECHNOLOGY PROGRAM        WHERE DO I START?
First Things First• College Performs a Gap Analysis – What is missing  Type of training     Research (biomedical, environm...
• Make sure the program aligns with industry needs  You can’t do this on your own  What state and local organizations trac...
The most surprising aspect of      starting the Biotechnology &          Compliance programThe willingness of companies to...
Developing New Workforce Training Programs and Platforms: The Catalytic Role of Bioscience Trade Associations in Defibrill...
Eye-balling and Traversing the Bioscience Industries          Workforce Development Arena      -Observations Over the Past...
SEC DisclaimerChair, WF/Education Committees 1995-2006 (BODs)   – BIOCOM, BayBio, SoCalBio   – California Healthcare Insti...
The Workforce Development Landscape            Federal       State                         Agencies           Agencies    ...
onstellation of Actors in the Theater Workforce Development                                                     City WIB  ...
Research and                            Information,             Manufacturing Technical                  Sales and  Produ...
Research and                                 Information,               Manufacturing    Technical                  Sales ...
Layers of Complexity                                                Cities                      Cities          DOL       ...
The Take Home Lesson
Trade Organizations to the Rescue!                                                  Cities                       City DD  ...
The Trade Organization: Integrator ofRegional Inputs to Build Industry Clusters                    Intellectual           ...
T-ORGS: a WF developmentcoordinator, organizer, catalystand nucleating device…often adefibrillator              City WIB  ...
Problems Facing T-ORGs in WF Development                 -Cities and Counties-• Often naïve understanding of the playing f...
Problems Facing T-ORGs in WF Development                 -Cities and Counties-• Unreasonable expectations of the WF develo...
WIB, etc. & Naïve Understanding of the Biotech Industry         1985                          1990    Recomb   Monoclonal ...
Complexity of the Biotech Industry 2009         -27 Years after 1986-                              DNA-based              ...
Knowledge of Training Ingredients?
Wouldn’t It Be Nice If It Were This Easy!!
Regulatory Affairs                                          Clinical Affairs      Quality                                 ...
Points of Attack of T-ORGs in WF Development                “Sector Intermediary Role”                               -Citi...
Problems Facing T-ORGs    -Operating In the Sphere of the DOL, one person’s experiences-•   Hooray…T-ORGs are recognized a...
H1B’s in the Biotechnology Industry                    2000-2007• 6-10% of the biotech WF = 18,000• 80% passed through US ...
What is/was the DOC Thinking? Is it reallymaking the H1B problem go away…or is there        another agenda at work?….
Trade Organizations to the Rescue!                                                  Cities                       City DD  ...
T-ORGs: A Firm Foundation on Which to  Coordinate and Facilitate Workforce             Development
Innovative and New Programs in Biotechnology and Biomanufacturing
Innovative and New Programs in Biotechnology and Biomanufacturing
Innovative and New Programs in Biotechnology and Biomanufacturing
Innovative and New Programs in Biotechnology and Biomanufacturing
Innovative and New Programs in Biotechnology and Biomanufacturing
Innovative and New Programs in Biotechnology and Biomanufacturing
Innovative and New Programs in Biotechnology and Biomanufacturing
Innovative and New Programs in Biotechnology and Biomanufacturing
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Innovative and New Programs in Biotechnology and Biomanufacturing

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This year’s panel features programs noteworthy in their approach to biotechnology/biomanufacturing education and training and the workforce. Panelists include leaders of the Lone Star Biotechnology Institute at Lone Star College working with the local biomedical and biofuels industry in Houston, TX; the Biomass Production Training Certificate at Mira Costa College part of the EDGE (Educating and Developing Workers for the Green Economy) initiative for San Diego County, CA; the SoCalBio Biomanufacturing Consortium to develop biomanufacturing technician education and training programs to support the maturation of the industry in Los Angeles/Orange Counties, CA; and a new program, Biotechnology and Compliance, focusing on biomanufacturing and partnered with local industry at Quincy College in Quincy, MA

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Innovative and New Programs in Biotechnology and Biomanufacturing

  1. 1. PartnershipsSonia WallmanExecutive Director, NBC2January 13, 2012 – Bio-Link Conference
  2. 2. PartnershipsCommunity colleges traditionally have been tasked tosupport local industry by providing apt education andtraining for their industries.Key to this role are academia-industry partnerships andgrants that support the development of such strategicalliances (NSF ATE and DOL ETA grants, for instance).Research questions that arise to understand theserelationships are:What are the characteristics of effective partnerships andcollaborations?How are they developed and how are they sustained?
  3. 3. NBC2 Partnerships Case Study 12 partners were interviewed by Dr. Joanna Kile, their conclusions were: Have a product and stay focused on delivering it.Partnerships exist in the relationship: the more points of connection the stronger the relationship Build trust by committing and then following throughRecognize that a successful partnership is a long-term commitment Identify champions within the group Solicit the opinion of all partners Be prepared to give more than to receive Share your success stories Forget what you have done in the past; find out what you need in order to be in business five years from now.
  4. 4. NBC2 Biomanufacturing Products GBC Laboratory Manual generic and customized Introduction to Biomanufacturing textbook Biofuels Production and Analysis textbook and lab manual Protein is Cash Teachers Workshop BIOMAN Annual Conference Adult 360hr/12wk Biomanufacturing Certificate Hybrid post-baccalaureate 120hr/15wk BIOMAN Certificate Future = modular curriculum to suit local biomanufacturing needs; provision of supplies for teaching the modules
  5. 5. Virtual Biomanufacturing Production
  6. 6. Panelists Introduction Danny Kainer from Lonestar Community College in Houston, TX Bruce Van Dyke from Quincy College in Quincy, MA Steve Dahms from SoCalBio in Los Angeles/Orange Counties, CA
  7. 7. A thumbnail sketch of our college system• Opened in 1973 (as North Harris College) with an enrollment of 613 students and 15 staff members • Is now the 2nd largest community college system in Texas • ~80,000 credit students; >90,000 if one includes CE! • The LSC System covers over 1,400 square miles & includes 11 member school districts!
  8. 8. My personal favorite… LSC-Montgomery• >13,000 students• Only biotechnology program in the LSC system, which is the oldest in the state & is recognized by TSSB
  9. 9. SECOND YEAR LSCBI – AAS & ATC Programs
  10. 10. LSCBI - Graduates
  11. 11. LSCBI – Outreach
  12. 12. LSCBI Partners (a sampling)
  13. 13. Taking ourBiotechnology Institute in a New Direction
  14. 14. On Campus Research Opportunities 1. Algae-to-Oil 2. Oil-to-Biodiesel 3. Water Remediation 4.Microbial Fuel Cells http://www.inhabitat.com/wp-content/uploads/algae6.jpg http://ejournal.vudat.msu.edu/images/thumb232.jpghttp://community.middlebury.edu/~cri/biodiesel_cycle.png http://www.freepatentsonline.com/6923914-0-large.jpg
  15. 15. Received Generous Donations & Loans from local algae entrepreneurs (Thanks!)
  16. 16. Algal Culture
  17. 17. PBR Construction (lab scale)
  18. 18. PBR Construction (mid-scale)
  19. 19. The “Tea Cup” PBR
  20. 20. PBR Construction (mid-scale)
  21. 21. PBR Construction(commercial scale)
  22. 22. Inoculation
  23. 23. Flow Cytometry (with a visual twist!)
  24. 24. Flow Cam Project – Contamination DetectionContamination detection (wow – that Chlorella vulgaris sure is robust!)
  25. 25. Flow Cam Project – Cell Count Validation
  26. 26. Flow Cam Project – NileRed Lipid Analysis http://omlc.ogi.edu/spectra/PhotochemCAD/html/nilered.html
  27. 27. Algal Nutraceuticals
  28. 28. WVO-to-Biodiesel Project
  29. 29. WVO-to- Biodiesel Project Lower ToxicityFeedstock Biodiesel Library Library
  30. 30. WVO-to-Biodiesel Project
  31. 31. Biodiesel Project - Biorefinery
  32. 32. Biorefinery http://oilgae.com/includes/site_img/origin_oil.jpg
  33. 33. WVO-to-Biodiesel Project
  34. 34. MFCs: Electricity From Mud!http://i.treehugger.com/images/2007/10/24/microbial%20fuel%20cell-jj-001.jpg http://parts.mit.edu/igem07/index.php/Image:Spbfc.jpg
  35. 35. Microbial Fuel Cell Project
  36. 36. Molecular Biology &Microbial Fuel Cells?
  37. 37. WaterBioremediation
  38. 38. Water Remediation Project
  39. 39. Water Remediation Project
  40. 40. Bionanotechnology?
  41. 41. Nanotech & Algae?
  42. 42. Nanotechnology &Microbial Fuel Cells?
  43. 43. Nanotechnology &Microbial Fuel Cells?
  44. 44. Nanotechnology &Microbial Fuel Cells?
  45. 45. Nanotechnology & Water Remediation? “Nano Rust”(http://www.gizmag.com/go/6448/)
  46. 46. Thanks for your attention!
  47. 47. STARTING A BIOTECHNOLOGY PROGRAM WHERE DO I START?
  48. 48. First Things First• College Performs a Gap Analysis – What is missing Type of training Research (biomedical, environmental, biofuels) Manufacturing (drugs, medical devices) Will the college support the program? Financially Faculty Support• Primary Purpose of the Program Get students job after completing the program? Prepare them to transfer to a university to obtain a B.S.
  49. 49. • Make sure the program aligns with industry needs You can’t do this on your own What state and local organizations track biotechnology• Focus the program – Do not dilute student learning by being to broad based• Corporate Partners – Who you know and who they know The primary way of getting in the door This opens the door to internships• Incumbent worker training – Short Courses Expanding your student base State and local biotechnology initiative grants
  50. 50. The most surprising aspect of starting the Biotechnology & Compliance programThe willingness of companies to work with me on everyaspect of the program and to make commitments of timeand resources to enable the program to produce competentstudents ready to enter the workforce.
  51. 51. Developing New Workforce Training Programs and Platforms: The Catalytic Role of Bioscience Trade Associations in Defibrillating Companies, CollegeAdministrators and Faculty, WIBs, 1-Stop Centers and Government Agencies A. Stephen Dahms President and CEO Emeritus, Alfred E. Mann Foundation Vice President Academic, Industry and Government Affairs, So. California Biomedical Council Member Federal Emerging Technology and Research Advisory Committee
  52. 52. Eye-balling and Traversing the Bioscience Industries Workforce Development Arena -Observations Over the Past 15 Years-
  53. 53. SEC DisclaimerChair, WF/Education Committees 1995-2006 (BODs) – BIOCOM, BayBio, SoCalBio – California Healthcare Institute – Addressed the full span of regional WF development activities -> national and international level, including the medical device arena (AdvaMed)Chair, BIO WF Development Committee 1996-2007 (BIO/ECSBOD and BOD Committees 1994-2008) – DOC, DOE, NSF, DOL, NIH, BLS, GAO, Beltway groups – House and Senate Science/Labor Committees – NRC/NAS/IOM/NAE: GUIRR, Federal Demonstration Pship – International organizations: EU and OECD (1998-2008) – Professional scientific societies – H1B visas, Skills Standards, training needs (#s and areas)
  54. 54. The Workforce Development Landscape Federal State Agencies Agencies Regional/City & County Agencies
  55. 55. onstellation of Actors in the Theater Workforce Development City WIB City DD DOL County County DD WIB DOE ????? 1-Stop 1-Stop CC Centers Centers District NSF/NIH State EDD State CC DOC Office Cos & Non- Profits
  56. 56. Research and Information, Manufacturing Technical Sales and Product and Production Affairs Finance andDevelopment Marketing Administration
  57. 57. Research and Information, Manufacturing Technical Sales and Product and Production Affairs Finance andDevelopment Marketing Administration
  58. 58. Layers of Complexity Cities Cities DOL CDDs CountieWIBs Counties s WIBs DOE ????? CCDs X1 X1 CC -Stop -Stop District NSF/NIH State Centers Centers EDD State CC DOC Office Cos & Non- Profits
  59. 59. The Take Home Lesson
  60. 60. Trade Organizations to the Rescue! Cities City DD DOL CountieWIBs Counties s WIBs DOE T-ORG CCDs X1 X1 CC -Stop -Stop District NSF/NIH State Centers Centers EDD State CC DOC Office Cos & Non- Profits
  61. 61. The Trade Organization: Integrator ofRegional Inputs to Build Industry Clusters Intellectual Capital Financial Human Capital Capital Regional IntegratorIndustry Cluster Industry Cluster
  62. 62. T-ORGS: a WF developmentcoordinator, organizer, catalystand nucleating device…often adefibrillator City WIB City DD DOL County County DD WIB T-ORGs DOE 1-Stop 1-Stop CC Centers Centers District NSF/NIH State EDD State CC DOC Office Non- Profits
  63. 63. Problems Facing T-ORGs in WF Development -Cities and Counties-• Often naïve understanding of the playing field by the players: understanding of technology…some still bemoaning the loss of the buggy-whip industry• Layers of complexity…especially in megacities• Pre-existing, high-walled political bailiwicks• Historical partnering among the players and segmentation difficult to change: breaking up the “party”…divorces are difficult• Time-lines for completion of projects: triage vs. long-term solutions• “Project Product”: sustainability vs. triage• Players lack of understanding of the necessary resources
  64. 64. Problems Facing T-ORGs in WF Development -Cities and Counties-• Unreasonable expectations of the WF development arena regarding companies• CC’s: administrators, role of non-academic training operations, multiple CC’s aiming for the same targets, unrealistic expectations of companies, survey impacts, moving off the “molecular biology” raison d’etre dime• T-ORG BOD’s: regional, state, and national• 2-year -> 4-year institutional programs: regionally-approved, industry validated layered, stackable certificates• Research universities: often a considerable problem: understanding the critical role of CC’s, intrusion into CC space, sparse laboratory training in some universities• A battle of wills…and entrenched public service organizations very adept at survival
  65. 65. WIB, etc. & Naïve Understanding of the Biotech Industry 1985 1990 Recomb Monoclonal Recomb Monoclonal DNA Antibodies DNA Antibodies Small Gene Antisense Molecules Therapy
  66. 66. Complexity of the Biotech Industry 2009 -27 Years after 1986- DNA-based computation Bioinformatics (Data management & Data mining) Proteomics- Computational expression analysis drug design Genetic Novel Profiling Pharmacogenomics chemistries Micro-arrays & Biosensors Gene Anti-sensenanotechnologies therapy RNAi, etc. High Combinatorial throughput Recombinant MAbs& phage chemistry screening DNA technologies display Multiplexed Array of Technologies
  67. 67. Knowledge of Training Ingredients?
  68. 68. Wouldn’t It Be Nice If It Were This Easy!!
  69. 69. Regulatory Affairs Clinical Affairs Quality Built into core business courses for all center degrees5.0 FDA Compliance 3.3 Optimizing of chromatographic techniques4.5 IND, NDA and other regulatory submissions 3.3 Pharmacokinetics4.5 cGMP, GCP and GLP 3.3 Pharmacodynamics4.2 Clinical trial design and modeling 3.3 Drug discovery-Conventional & rational drug design4.1 Technical writing 3.3 Functional genomics4.1 cGMP documentation 3.3 Proteomics4.1 Process validation 3.3 Small molecule manufacturing & scale-up issues4.0 Project management 3.3 Toxicology and toxicokinetics4.0 Team-based approaches 3.3 Sterilization4.0 Analytical methods development and validation 3.2 Facility design4.0 Materials and document control 3.2 Principles of industrial hygiene4.0 cGMP training 3.2 Biotechnology and drug design3.9 Quality and production 3.2 General pharmaceutical science3.9 Regulatory strategies and negotiation 3.2 Design controls3.9 Clinical trial statistical analysis 3.2 Facility management3.9 Principles of information systems 3.2 Basic biochemical engineering3.8 Clinical data management 3.2 Combinatorial chemistry3.8 Implementation of clinical trials 3.1 Pharmaceutical delivery systems3.8 Control systems 3.1 Manufacturing execution systems3.8 Clinical trials administration 3.1 Separation and purification3.8 Team-based approaches in biotech. dev. & production 3.1 Protein stability and formulation3.8 cGMP audits 3.0 Statistical process control3.7 International regulatory affairs and ISO-9000 3.0 Pharmacoeconomics3.7 Systems documentation 3.0 Manufacturing personnel training3.6 Facility validation 2.9 Instrumentation in downstream monitoring3.6 Global CMC (chemistry, manufacturing and control) 2.9 Bio/pharmaceutical technology mgmt.3.6 Clinical trials audits 2.9 Mgmt. of development & tech.-based innovation3.5 Corporate partnering 2.8 Combinatorial biology3.5 Regulatory affairs professional training 2.8 Bio/pharmaceutical marketing3.5 CRA training 2.8 Computers in bioprocess engineering3.5 Process development strategies 2.8 Mammalian cell perfusion reactors3.5 Bioinformatics 2.7 Fermentation strategies3.5 Good statistical practices in drug development 2.7 Drug release technology3.5 Statistical process control 2.6 Robotics in drug discovery3.4 Hazardous waste management 2.6 Mgmt. & organizational behavior3.4 Electronic document management and submissions 2.4 Biochemical reactor design & configuration3.4 Pharmaceutical formulation and stability 2.3 Intelligent biomanufacturing3.4 Pharmacogenetics3.4 Computer and software validation3.4 Communications3.4 Manufacturing process technologies3.4 Operation scheduling
  70. 70. Points of Attack of T-ORGs in WF Development “Sector Intermediary Role” -Cities and Counties-• Facilitating an increased understanding of the playing field• Removing layers of complexity…especially in megacities• Circumventing or removing high-walled political bailiwicks• Expanding partnering among the technologically-naïve players• Encouraging departure from total reliance on triage approaches• Demanding sustainability• Educating the players on the true costs of training in the 21 st century• Embracing CC administrators and engaging them in solutions• Catalyzing applied research and manufacturing programs: faculty training• Stimulation of specialized training facilities, especially in the megacities• Education of T-ORG boards of directors• Creating regionally-approved, industry validated layered, stackable certificates• Constant education of the research universities• Outreach to federal agencies• Triage of the DOL
  71. 71. Problems Facing T-ORGs -Operating In the Sphere of the DOL, one person’s experiences-• Hooray…T-ORGs are recognized as Sector Intermediaries, but...there are DOL focal problems – Little DOL concept of need for sustainability – Little DOL concept of training costs – Entry-level employee predominant focus – Reorientation of Congressional mandates – “Spread the Geld” political mentality – Reviewers: Invaders from Planet X• Underdeveloped appreciation of true vs. interpolated WF needs – H1B Training Skills RFP case in point
  72. 72. H1B’s in the Biotechnology Industry 2000-2007• 6-10% of the biotech WF = 18,000• 80% passed through US higher education• Degrees: in red, composition of the US biotech WF – 40% PhD (19%) – 35% MS (17%) – 20% BS (50%) – 5% MD – 0% AA/AS/vocEd (14%)• 85% acquired permanent residency ($150M)• And the role of the DOL is exactly what in addressing this dependency upon foreign nationals?
  73. 73. What is/was the DOC Thinking? Is it reallymaking the H1B problem go away…or is there another agenda at work?….
  74. 74. Trade Organizations to the Rescue! Cities City DD DOL CountieWIBs Counties s WIBs DOE T-ORG CCDs X1 X1 CC -Stop -Stop District NSF/NIH State Centers Centers EDD State CC DOC Office Cos & Non- Profits
  75. 75. T-ORGs: A Firm Foundation on Which to Coordinate and Facilitate Workforce Development

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