WelcomeCommunity College Program
Annual Community College Program Day        Organizing Committee • Sonia Wallman – Executive Director NBC2 • Elaine Johnso...
Massachusetts BioPharma Employment             Continues GrowthThe industryweatheredthe 2009downturnwithout anemploymentdr...
Biotechnology R&D Employment                                                 2007                         2010According to...
Drug Development Pipeline, August 2011                    Candidate medicines of Massachusetts-headquartered* companies, b...
Massachusetts Pipeline by Therapeutic                              Area                                                   ...
Venture Capital Investment$1.071 billioninvested in MAbiotechs in 2011is an historichigh. $8.054 billion since 2002       ...
MA Share of the Biotech VC DollarMA biotechsreceived 22.6%of all VC biotechfinancing, justbelow the 2010all-time high.    ...
Leading BioPharma Employers (MA), 2011                   1. Genzyme (Sanofi)                                          4,35...
Mass BiomanufacturingOf the top 11biopharmamanufacturingstates, Massachusetts was one ofjust four whichaddedmanufacturingj...
BioPharma Industry Impact in MAThe estimatedaveragesalary in thebiopharmaindustry is                              $4,615,3...
Why Massachusetts?                        500+                        430+                       Biopharma                ...
The $1 Billion Massachusetts Life                          Sciences InitiativeOver time, theindustrydemonstrated itsvalue,...
Education and Workforce Development              Initiatives U.S. Department of Labor to receive the Trade Adjustment Assi...
Northeast Biomanufacturers andCommunity Colleges with Biomanufacturing
Greetings and Opening Remarks
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Greetings and Opening Remarks

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Welcoming message given by Sonia Wallman, of the Organizing Committee, and Lance Hartford, the Executive Director of the Massachusetts Biotechnology Education Foundation.

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  • Representatives of many of the Massachusetts community colleges are present here today: Middlesex CC, Minuteman Technical Institute, Mount Wachusett CC, Quincy College, Roxbury CC, Springfield Tech, Northern Essex CC, Massasoit CC, Berkshire CC, Bristol CC, Bunker Hill CC, and Holyoke CC. In addition, many other community colleges in the Northeastern US are represented, including Great Bay CC in NH; the Community College of RI; Manchester CC in CT; Hudson Valley CC in NY; Middlesex County and Bergen CC in NJ, and last but not least Bucks and Montgomery County CC in PA. Maggie Bryans is the Principal Investigator of the NBC2 and has put this meeting together for all of us.There are several partners from industry here, as well: former student and biomanufacturing apprentice, David Haddad at Millennium Pharmaceuticals, priceless colleague from engaged partner Lonza, Ben Locwin; harmonization of skill standards and strategic planning meeting participant, John Sauers from Abbott and Bill Chambrione from Shire who has supported the new 360hr/12 week adult biomanufacturing certificate at Minuteman Technical Institute. Welcome to all and back to Lance and Russ to lead our first panel, Industry – Realities and Expectations.
  • Greetings and Opening Remarks

    1. 1. WelcomeCommunity College Program
    2. 2. Annual Community College Program Day Organizing Committee • Sonia Wallman – Executive Director NBC2 • Elaine Johnson – Bio-Link Director • Russ Read – National Center, NC BioNetwork • Lance Hartford – MassBioEd Foundation • Margaret Bryans – PI NBC2, Montgomery County Community College • Lisa Seidman – Madison Area Technical College • Tim Dubuque - NBC2
    3. 3. Massachusetts BioPharma Employment Continues GrowthThe industryweatheredthe 2009downturnwithout anemploymentdrop. 53% Growth since Source: U.S. Census, County Business Patterns and MassBio formula and analysis. 2002 *2011 figure is a preliminary estimate based on review of Massachusetts ES-202 data for 2010-2011.
    4. 4. Biotechnology R&D Employment 2007 2010According to theBureau of Labor CA 19,134 21,616Statistics’ CT 2,452 1,582Quarterly Census MA 24,565 26,807of Employment &Wage (QCEW) MD 10,154 9,469data, Massachus MI 4,670 2,759etts leads thenation in MO 4,262 3,874biotechnology NJ 8,567 9,224research &development NY 2,679 3,553employment. NC 7,042 6,275 PA 15,902 12,776 WA 2,499 3,730 Source: U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics, Quarterly Census of Employment and Wages (QCEW)
    5. 5. Drug Development Pipeline, August 2011 Candidate medicines of Massachusetts-headquartered* companies, by clinical trials stage Pre-Clinical 316Massachusetts- Phase I 216headquarteredcompanies* Phase II 275account for about Phase III 7610% of the U.S. Pending Approval 14drug developmentpipeline and 5% Massachusetts-headquartered companies’ share of U.S. and Global drugof the global development pipelinepipeline. Total Trials PC I II III PA % of US 9.41% 11.00% 11.99% 8.26% 8.46% 3.89% % of Global 4.91% 5.88% 6.43% 4.56% 3.52% 1.44% * There are many drugs in development in Massachusetts by companies with headquarters located outside of Massachusetts. These candidate drugs are not included in any Massachusetts pipeline estimates found in this report. Source: MedTrack Online, Life Sciences Analytics, Inc.
    6. 6. Massachusetts Pipeline by Therapeutic Area Total Trials CompaniesOf the 897 drugs in Cancer 383 59the Massachusetts Central Nervous System 91 35pipeline, 42.7% Infectious 84 30are cancer drugs. Autoimmune and Inflammation 61 33 Metabolic/Endocrinology 47 23Drugs intended for Ophthalmology and Optometry 32 13the Central Respiratory and Pulmonary System 32 20Nervous System Blood and Lymphatic System 30 16(CNS) therapeutic Cardiovascular & Circulatory 25 36area are next at Musculo-Skeletal-Disorders 24 1110.1% of the Digestive 19 15pipeline. Dermotology 18 15 Kidney & Genito-Urinary 13 10 Genetic Diseases & Dysmorphic Syndromes 11 6 Substance Abuse 10 5 Womens Health 9 6 Miscellaneous 8 7 Source: MedTrack Online, Life Sciences Analytics, Inc.
    7. 7. Venture Capital Investment$1.071 billioninvested in MAbiotechs in 2011is an historichigh. $8.054 billion since 2002 Source Data: 2011 PricewaterhouseCoopers, National Venture Capital Association, MoneyTreeTM Report, Historical Trend Data, and MassBio analysis.
    8. 8. MA Share of the Biotech VC DollarMA biotechsreceived 22.6%of all VC biotechfinancing, justbelow the 2010all-time high. Source: 2011 PricewaterhouseCoopers, National Venture Capital Association, MoneyTreeTM Report, Historical Trend Data, MassBio analysis.
    9. 9. Leading BioPharma Employers (MA), 2011 1. Genzyme (Sanofi) 4,356 2. Pfizer 2,600 3. Biogen Idec 2,300 4. Novartis 2,100MA has benefited 5. Thermo Fisher Scientific 1,700from the pharma 6. Shire 1,500industry’s 7. Vertex 1,310embrace of 8. EMD Millipore 1,237biotechnology. 9. Parexel International 1,200 10. Millenium: Takeda Oncology 1,050 11. Charles River Laboratories 970 12. AstraZeneca 900 13. EMD Serono 850 14. Hologic 800 15. Abbott Laboratories 750 16. Sunovion Pharmaceuticals (DSP) 690 17. Nova Biomedical 631 18. Cubist 626 19. Lantheus 550 19. Merck 330 20. Bristol-Myers Squibb 320 Sources: MassBio, membership reports, survey, Boston Business Journal Book of Lists, 2011.
    10. 10. Mass BiomanufacturingOf the top 11biopharmamanufacturingstates, Massachusetts was one ofjust four whichaddedmanufacturingjobs in the lastdecade
    11. 11. BioPharma Industry Impact in MAThe estimatedaveragesalary in thebiopharmaindustry is $4,615,364,513 in payroll (2010)77% higherthan theestimated $95,628 in average salary (2010)state averagesalary of$53,834. Source: U.S. Census, County Business Patterns, MassBio estimate using 2009 base data . M a s s a c h u s e tts E x p o rts , 2 0 1 0 A ll C o m m o d itie s 2 6 ,2 5 6 ,3 7 0 ,2 0 1 O p tic , P h o to E tc , M e d ic O r S u rg ic a l In s trm e n ts E tc 5 ,3 2 4 ,5 1 1 ,9 4 0 2 0 .2 0 % In d u s tria l M a c h in e ry, In c lu d in g C o m p u te rs 4 ,6 0 1 ,7 1 5 ,0 8 6 E le c tric M a c h in e ry E tc ; S o u n d E q u ip ; T v E q u ip ; P ts 4 ,5 1 8 ,6 6 2 ,8 8 0 P h a rm a c e u tic a l P ro d u c ts 2 ,1 3 6 ,3 0 6 ,4 5 6 8 .1 0 % Source: MassExport Center
    12. 12. Why Massachusetts? 500+ 430+ Biopharma Biotech Companies 122 Top 5 Top 5 NIH fundedColleges & NIH funded ResearchUniversities Research Hospitals Hospitals 1st in 1st in Venture Capital Education & SBIR funds federal research Level of funds per worker per worker Workforce workforce (US) Supportive Local, State Government Life Sciences Initiative Biotech Caucus
    13. 13. The $1 Billion Massachusetts Life Sciences InitiativeOver time, theindustrydemonstrated itsvalue, commitment to theregion, andpromise for thefuture . . . andstate governmentresponded. • 10 years • $1 billion Investment
    14. 14. Education and Workforce Development Initiatives U.S. Department of Labor to receive the Trade Adjustment Assistance Community College and Career Training Grant. $20M The Metro Boston Skilled Careers in Life Sciences (SCILS) initiative $5M – Life Sciences Center & Quincy College Mass Life Science Center Internship Program - since the program first launched in 2009, the Center has placed 794 interns at more than 250 companies throughout Massachusetts! MassBioEd Foundation’s industry endorsement of eight community college programs
    15. 15. Northeast Biomanufacturers andCommunity Colleges with Biomanufacturing

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