Successfully reported this slideshow.
We use your LinkedIn profile and activity data to personalize ads and to show you more relevant ads. You can change your ad preferences anytime.
PLC Training by Business Industrial Network 11/02/2014 
1 
This presentation is designed to give you the basics of what a ...
PLC Training by Business Industrial Network 11/02/2014 
2 
Business Industrial Network www.BIN95.com 
Copyright 2014 by ww...
PLC Training by Business Industrial Network 11/02/2014 
3 
It’s best to first learn what a PLC is to better understand why...
PLC Training by Business Industrial Network 11/02/2014 
Everything in the PLC is 1s and 0s, on and off, etc. , like switch...
PLC Training by Business Industrial Network 11/02/2014 
Person in control uses Sense of sight to determine room is dark, s...
PLC Training by Business Industrial Network 11/02/2014 
But the smart sensor is very limited in decisions it can make, unl...
PLC Training by Business Industrial Network 11/02/2014 
The PLC, just like the human … 
1. Looks at inputs for sensors, th...
PLC Training by Business Industrial Network 11/02/2014 
It started out as hard wiring Relays which made modifying circuits...
PLC Training by Business Industrial Network 11/02/2014 
Scan Cycle = Inputs, Ladder Logic, Outputs (repeat) 
Inputs: There...
PLC Training by Business Industrial Network 11/02/2014 
The PLC 5 is the full size (regular) PLC series. (Item numbers lik...
PLC Training by Business Industrial Network 11/02/2014 
SLC 5/01 This processor offers a basic set of 51 instructions with...
PLC Training by Business Industrial Network 11/02/2014 
When you plug into a PLC with a computer and open the PLC vendor’s...
Copyright 2014 by www.bin95.com 13
PLC Training by Business Industrial Network 11/02/2014 
Of course Safety and Reliability are a given, but keep in mind the...
PLC Training by Business Industrial Network 11/02/2014 
But it doesn’t matter if you have 5 PLCs or 50, the odds are misha...
PLC Training by Business Industrial Network 11/02/2014 
Copyright 2014 by www.bin95.com 16
PLC Training by Business Industrial Network 11/02/2014 
Besides protecting a company’s bottom line, technology keeps evolv...
PLC Training by Business Industrial Network 11/02/2014 
Many believe you complete one PLC training software program, or ta...
PLC Training by Business Industrial Network 11/02/2014 
As you might have already known, the most effective PLC training i...
PLC Training by Business Industrial Network 11/02/2014 
Extra slides follow this one should there be extra time today, and...
PLC Training by Business Industrial Network 11/02/2014 
21 
This slide and the following slides are excerpts from our inst...
PLC Training by Business Industrial Network 11/02/2014 
22 
The methods we have chosen are based on experience over many y...
PLC Training by Business Industrial Network 11/02/2014 
23 
As mentioned earlier, in all windows type programs, there are ...
PLC Training by Business Industrial Network 11/02/2014 
The cable selection chart shown organizes the various cables used ...
PLC Training by Business Industrial Network 11/02/2014 
25 
IMPORTANT! Click the Normal Protection Control button if you w...
PLC Training by Business Industrial Network 11/02/2014 
26 
This is another slide from bin95.com instructor based PLC trai...
PLC Training by Business Industrial Network 11/02/2014 
27 
The instructor will show you in the actual RSLogix software, s...
28 
Another slide from our instructor based course 
you won’t see in other’s PLC courses, or in PLC 
training delivered vi...
PLC Training by Business Industrial Network 11/02/2014 
This is a PAC. It looks like a PLC, but the important differences ...
PLC Training by Business Industrial Network 11/02/2014 
30 
We also put extra slides in our on-site, and seminar powerpoin...
Upcoming SlideShare
Loading in …5
×

What is a PLC ?

2,798 views

Published on

Free PLC training PowerPoint from the 1 hour webinar we did for the Association for Facilities Engineering. Of course with 30 slides and instructor notes for each, because as those who use our training know, we give extra. Actually we went over by 45 min on this PLC training and we didn't even talk about the extra PLC training slides in this one. We start with what is a PLC put in the most simplest form possible, and then get you a little taste of our best practice PLC training and approach from our PLC training seminars and on-site PLc training.

Published in: Engineering

What is a PLC ?

  1. 1. PLC Training by Business Industrial Network 11/02/2014 1 This presentation is designed to give you the basics of what a PLC is, and why you should know. This PLC training PowerPoint is from 1 hour Webinar BIN95.com president put on for the Association for Facilities Engineering (AFE.org). Pictured here is what a PLC looks like. It’s a small square computing device that controls machines and has a bunch of LED lights. Next time you ride an elevator, sit at a traffic light, or use the water faucet, think about the fact that a PLC, or PLC like device is controlling it. Next time you look at all the machines in a manufacturing plant, know that each one probably has a PLC in it controlling that machine, being the brains of the operation. Copyright 2014 by www.bin95.com
  2. 2. PLC Training by Business Industrial Network 11/02/2014 2 Business Industrial Network www.BIN95.com Copyright 2014 by www.bin95.com
  3. 3. PLC Training by Business Industrial Network 11/02/2014 3 It’s best to first learn what a PLC is to better understand why all of maintenance, and engineering should know these basics of what a PLC is. ☺ PLC and lighting control – On or off, it is as simple as that. Technology evolution – Smaller and faster in a nut shell PLC control cycle – Who’s in control now? PLC Programming – What to look for. PLC/Automation management – Save money you didn't even know you where losing. Why train all maintenance & engineering? – And at what levels? Copyright 2014 by www.bin95.com
  4. 4. PLC Training by Business Industrial Network 11/02/2014 Everything in the PLC is 1s and 0s, on and off, etc. , like switches that are on or off. A lot about the PLC and working with it can be simplified to that same level… 1 or 0, on or off, true or false. In this 1 hour webinar, we will be keeping it to its most simplest form. We could go on about that “PLC” stands for Programmable Logic Controller and all, but everyone refers to them as PLC, so for this webinar purpose, you do not need to memorize acronyms. As long as when we are done, if someone mentions “PLC” to you, you know what they are talking about. Copyright 2014 by www.bin95.com 4
  5. 5. PLC Training by Business Industrial Network 11/02/2014 Person in control uses Sense of sight to determine room is dark, so turns on light. The person’s eye is a sensor input, and their brain the controller making the decision, and their finger output action of flipping on light. Copyright 2014 by www.bin95.com 5
  6. 6. PLC Training by Business Industrial Network 11/02/2014 But the smart sensor is very limited in decisions it can make, unlike the human doing the same job. Also important to note, if we wanted to add conditions, it would take hard wiring and possible replacement of sensor/control to modify control. So greater time and cost will result than if a PLC was used to control light. Copyright 2014 by www.bin95.com 6
  7. 7. PLC Training by Business Industrial Network 11/02/2014 The PLC, just like the human … 1. Looks at inputs for sensors, then … 2. Makes a decision based on preset conditions it is programmed to look for, then … 3. Tells the output to energize and turn on the light. After step 3 above, it restarts the 3 steps over, in a continuous cycle (loop). This is called a scan cycle. Scan cycle = Scan inputs, process ladder logic, update outputs. Then repeat in a continuous loop. The advantages of a PLC over a human? The PLC frees up human time, and is more reliable. Equally advantageous is when process changes or is improved. No rewiring, and retraining of all humans in a building, manufacturing plant or society. Copyright 2014 by www.bin95.com 7
  8. 8. PLC Training by Business Industrial Network 11/02/2014 It started out as hard wiring Relays which made modifying circuits/control costly, and the electro-mechanical relay + wiring was less reliable. The PLC was specifically designed to reduce relays, wiring and cost while providing more reliable and flexible control. The PLC was also specifically designed to be as simple as possible for electricians to work with, so its designer’s adapted electrical diagrams as the programming language called Ladder Logic. About 10 years ago the PLC evolved into a PAC (Process Automation Controller). The PAC has many differences between them and a PLC, with the most notable being scan cycle and audience designed for. The PLC scans rungs in sequence and can only work on each of the 3 task, one task at a time. The PAC multi-task, update I/O simultaneously as it has multiple processors instead of just one micro-processor like the PLC has. But even more monumental than multi-tasking is the fact the PAC was designed for the IT/Computer programming audience, instead of electricians. Copyright 2014 by www.bin95.com 8
  9. 9. PLC Training by Business Industrial Network 11/02/2014 Scan Cycle = Inputs, Ladder Logic, Outputs (repeat) Inputs: There are basically 4 types of inputs to a PLC. There is discrete (1 or 0, on or off), analog (varying voltage or current), special and communications. Examples of discrete inputs are push buttons, limit switches, proximity sensors, etc. An examples of an analog input is a thermal couple that measures temperature. A special module example might be a high speed counter module you wire an encoder to that measures linier distance and speed. Communication modules are both inputs and outputs, sending and receiving data from another device external to the PLC. Ladder Logic: Is an electrical schematic used as the programming language of choice for a PLC. You will see rungs (electrical circuits) of logic on the computer software you use to access the PLC. Ladder logic is a blend of Boolean logic (1 and 0s language) and electrical schematic. One rung of logic can be interpreted as Boolean using key operands “IF”, “AND”, “OR”, “THEN”. [IF darkness is sensed AND motion is detected, THEN output to light.] “IF” starts new rung, “AND” and “OR” are conditions to be met, with “THEN” indicating output if rung conditions are met. Outputs: Outputs come in basically 4 types also, discrete, analog, special and communications. Outputs most commonly are discrete and wired to an external relay to drive greater current or voltage than the PLC is capable of internally. An analog output example is outputting a 0-10 volt signal proportional to the speed you want a motor to go. Copyright 2014 by www.bin95.com 9
  10. 10. PLC Training by Business Industrial Network 11/02/2014 The PLC 5 is the full size (regular) PLC series. (Item numbers like PLC 5/40, 5/20. 5/15 etc.) The SLC 500 is the “Small” series. (Item numbers like SLC 5/01, 5/02, 5/03, 5/04, and 5/05) The Micrologix is the smallest of all three legacy series. (The micro 1000 being the least expensive and smallest.) The PLC on the far right is the ControlLogix from the new series Allen Bradley came out with. The one shown is the full size of that new series. They then have a small PLC daubed “CompactLogix” and a very inexpensive FlexLogix in the new AB series of PLCs. Copyright 2014 by www.bin95.com 10
  11. 11. PLC Training by Business Industrial Network 11/02/2014 SLC 5/01 This processor offers a basic set of 51 instructions with the choice of 1K or 4K of memory in a modular hardware configuration. Modular I/O systems that include a SLC 5/01 processor can be configured with a maximum of three chassis (30 total slots) and from 4 I/O points to a maximum of 3940 I/O points. SLC 5/02 This processor offers additional complex instructions, enhanced communications, faster scan times than the SLC 5/01, and extensive diagnostics that allow it to function in more complex applications. SLC 5/03 This processor provides 8 K, 16 K, or 32 K of memory. A built-in RS- 232 channel gives you the flexibility to connect to external intelligent devices without the need for additional modules. SLC 5/04 The standard DH-485 port has been replaced with a DH+ port, providing high-speed SLC 5/04-to-SLC 5/04 communications and direct connection to PLC-5 controllers. The available memory options are 16 K, 32 K, or 64 K. In addition, there is an SLC 5/04P option, which is designed specifically for the Plastics Industry and contains ERC2 algorithms for Plastics Machinery Control. SLC 5/05 The SLC 5/05 processor provides the same functionality as the SLC 5/04 processor with standard Ethernet communications rather than DH+ communications. Ethernet communication occurs at 10 Mbps or 100 Mbps, providing a high performance network for program upload/download, online editing, and peer-to-peer messaging. Copyright 2014 by www.bin95.com 11
  12. 12. PLC Training by Business Industrial Network 11/02/2014 When you plug into a PLC with a computer and open the PLC vendor’s software, a screen similar to the one above is what you will see. On the left is a project tree which is files and folders like on your computer, but these all have to do with the PLC. On the right is the programming language, in this case Ladder Logic. The example pictured also has some key elements to best practices. Discripted subroutines, more than one subroutine, descriptions on all elements (contacts/coils) and supporting documentation like symbols/tags and rung descriptions. If the “DARK” contact (element) and the “MOTION” contact are highlighted green, the PLC will highlight green with the output “LIGHT_ON”. This allows the PLC to turn on the light in the real world. Copyright 2014 by www.bin95.com 12
  13. 13. Copyright 2014 by www.bin95.com 13
  14. 14. PLC Training by Business Industrial Network 11/02/2014 Of course Safety and Reliability are a given, but keep in mind there is usually room to make it more safe and reliable. The more experience, training, and exposure to other professional’s methods you have, the more likely you will see areas for improvement. So it requires a continuous learning and improvement program. Make sure the PLCs and PACs are primarily programmed in Ladder Logic so your electricians and in-house staff can understand them. Alternate programming languages should only be used if necessary to meet control expectations. Like with a PAC, the equipment designers have 5 programming languages to chose from. If the OEM chose to use structured text programming language, the people working with the machine may not be trained in IT or computer programming, which will drive up your total cost of ownership over the life cycle to possibly many times the original purchase. So it is well worth getting your maintenance trained enough to spot a lack of best practices, and have them involved in the purchasing process of equipment with a PLC/PAC in it. The quickest way for one to learn more about PLC programming, and learn industry standards is to study existing working programs. Copyright 2014 by www.bin95.com 14
  15. 15. PLC Training by Business Industrial Network 11/02/2014 But it doesn’t matter if you have 5 PLCs or 50, the odds are mishandling and mismanagement of your PLCs will negatively impact your operation and possibly bottom line. I have written much on this topic, and you can get more detailed advice in the article at http://bin95.com/maintenance_management_plc.htm http://bin95.com/maintenance_management_plc.htm For this short webinar, if I had to narrow it down to just three takeaways, they would be … •Inventory all your company’s PLCs (spreadsheet to help in article above.) •Train all of your maintenance and engineers (Who will be working with PLC controlled equipment) •Develop PLC policies and procedures. (SOP/ISO level would be nice, but some is better than none in this case.) Copyright 2014 by www.bin95.com 15
  16. 16. PLC Training by Business Industrial Network 11/02/2014 Copyright 2014 by www.bin95.com 16
  17. 17. PLC Training by Business Industrial Network 11/02/2014 Besides protecting a company’s bottom line, technology keeps evolving, and so should a company’s employees with the aid of proper PLC training. Notice the slide do not read “Why educate …” , it reads “”Why train …” While PLC education is always helpful, to reduce a company’s risk, its pesonel should be trained as well. That is trained in working with PLCs and automation safely, reliably, and using best practices. Worse case scenario for a company, they only have one employee who is their “PLC Guru”. An all your eggs in one basket situation. We recommend as a minimum 1 PLC Technician per shift, 1 from engineering department, and the maintenance manager. (As a minimum) Typically companies who don’t have the minimum, lose in downtime cost what it would cost for training or even an additional employee. PLC Training should meet our standards (http://bin95.com/plc_training.htm) covering not only scholastic knowledge, but real world practice application that focuses on Safety, Reliability and best practices. Just getting by with one training software, video course, seminar, book, or self taught should not acceptable for those who have to work with PLCs. The ultimate solution should be a holistic, and all of the above approach. (As time and money permit after considering reduced downtime savings and increased reliability value.) Copyright 2014 by www.bin95.com 17
  18. 18. PLC Training by Business Industrial Network 11/02/2014 Many believe you complete one PLC training software program, or take one online PLC course, or video course, and they’ll be ready to hit the ground running, troubleshooting, and modifying PLC programs in a machine or system that may cost thousands, or millions of dollars, with potential risk to man or machine. From the chart on this slide you can see that can’t be further from the truth if you want to remove most of that unnecessary risk. Believe it or not, some are out there taking that risk, and are only self taught. (They don’t know what they don’t know.☺ ) First, one should have the prerequisites of being trained in industrial electrical basics, and be computer literate. Then the next part of training should be the Safety, Reliability and Best practices foundations (Currently only taught by bin95.com and colleges we taught), which reduce the bulk of risk to man or machine. Then after establishing a good foundation to build on, then it is time to add the scholastic knowledge (books, video courses, basic software, etc.). From there you move on to acquiring the PLC troubleshooting experience, which could take years, or you could supplement that troubleshooting experience by using the training software at BIN95.com. Then the PLC tech needs to get experience on 2 or more PLC brands. That’s the basics of PLC training, then a person is ready to move on to advanced topics like PLC programming, communications, the PAC, and more computer training in prep for HMI and SCADA. The chart on this slide has guides based on job titles, and experiences. Based on your experiences, and your PLC related responsibilities, different levels of training are needed. You can download, and view full size chart at https://www.flickr.com/photos/manufacturing/15734663012/ Copyright 2014 by www.bin95.com 18
  19. 19. PLC Training by Business Industrial Network 11/02/2014 As you might have already known, the most effective PLC training is on-site, followed by hands-on seminars, with instructor based delivery methods. Then those training delivery methods are followed by online courses, video course, and training software, depending on the quality and approach of each. As on-site PLC training comes at a higher cost, and with instructor live on-site, time can be a limitation. That is why our approach is to first deliver the most important core foundation via instructor based on-site training, or training seminar. For more time consuming scholastic part of knowledge delivery, other delivery methods can be used more cost effectively, if building on the core foundation mentioned previously. Hopefully by now you are starting to realize no one single method is the total solution. It takes blended learning to cost effectively become a PLC expert working with PLCs safely, reliably, and using best practices. (http://bin95.blogspot.com/2012/02/path-to-plc-expertise.html) You can view a larger size chart at http://bin95.com/Why_onsite_training.htm Copyright 2014 by www.bin95.com 19
  20. 20. PLC Training by Business Industrial Network 11/02/2014 Extra slides follow this one should there be extra time today, and for you to review on your own time later. Several of the slides also mention extra learning links for resources that support the respective slide’s topic. Also remember when attending BIN95.com seminars or requesting a quote for on-site PLC training, that AFE members get 10% discount if they let us know they’re a member. I recommend everyone check out 3 free on-line PLC related courses on bottom of page http://bin95.com/university/ as part of their continuing education. Advice: If a person is saying, “I already had PLC training”, or “I have been working with PLCs for over 10 years, I don’t need additional training”. Ask yourself or them… In the previous PLC training? … How many tips on reducing downtime did the instructor give you? How many times did instructor give you advice on how to work safely with PLCs that was not in the PLC manual’s safety installation tips? How many ways to work with PLCs more reliably did the instructor pass along? How many best practices did you get instructed on? (Typically manuals only cover wiring and installation best practices, not best practices in programming, working with PLCs, or in managing them within your facility). Most will answer “none” to all of the above. For the few who do remember a few, but not details… its time for a refresher, or your annual PLC training. ☺ Copyright 2014 by www.bin95.com 20
  21. 21. PLC Training by Business Industrial Network 11/02/2014 21 This slide and the following slides are excerpts from our instructor based PLC training, shown here for additional information…. During BIN95.com instructor based PLC training, the above recommendations where emphasized. They are listed here as an reminder and for future reference. Copyright 2014 by www.bin95.com
  22. 22. PLC Training by Business Industrial Network 11/02/2014 22 The methods we have chosen are based on experience over many years, and within many industries. Not only are the methods taught in this class, highly recommended to reduce risk, but will also give you more confidence while working with PLCs, knowing you have a quick way to recover from most mistakes. You may notice some redundancy in the methods taught. Please note, this is to emphasize the more important methods while overcoming lesser efficient methods, and habits that may have been picked up from being self taught. Copyright 2014 by www.bin95.com
  23. 23. PLC Training by Business Industrial Network 11/02/2014 23 As mentioned earlier, in all windows type programs, there are several ways to perform the same task. Most tasks are accessible via “Toolbars” as this is found to be the easiest to remember. Individuals may better associate a picture icon with the word related to the task to be performed. The Search Tool (Find Instruction, Address/Symbol) is probably the most important, and most used tool. You can type in an input address, or the associated symbol (tag) for that input, and press enter. The display will go to the first rung found with that input. Then you can check for status, or monitor for change. The same search tool can be used with all types of contacts, and descriptions. Example: XIC I:2.0/2 with a symbol of “PE2” and a description of “TOP KNIFE WIDE LOAD PRESENT” This can be found by typing in … “I:2/2” or “PE2” or “KNIFE” (Note: there is only one contact with address I:2/2 or symbol “PE2”, but there may be many different contacts with “KNIFE” in their description.) Also important note: You see a red “x” on “Confirm Edit Tools” to remind you never use that worst practice. (As explained why in our instructor based PLC training.) With vendor PLC training, most college instructors, videos on YouTube (other than ours at bin952 channel), and most other PLC training providers, you will see them use and instruct you to use the “Confirm Edit Tools” without ever mentioning, or knowing to tell you “to never use these two toolbar buttons”, as it is worst practices and can cause huge amount of downtime. Even worse, the user of these two tool bar buttons will never know that is what caused them the downtime. So they will most likely never learn not to, unless they receive http://bin95.com instructor based PLC training, where a lot more best practices are taught. Copyright 2014 by www.bin95.com
  24. 24. PLC Training by Business Industrial Network 11/02/2014 The cable selection chart shown organizes the various cables used to access Allen Bradley’s PLC 5, SLC 500 series, and their Micrologix controller. The DH+ and Ethernet columns show cable choices if you want to view and access PLCs that are networked together. The Data Highway Plus is a secure industrial network. The Ethernet would be a less secure network common to computer networks. The RJ485 and RS232 columns have cables that would be your second choice if your PLC does not have DH+ or Ethernet connection capabilities. RJ485 is a standard industrial communication protocol while RS232 is standard to computers. If a company’s laptop does not have a 9 pin serial port (RS232) on it or a PCMCIA to RS232 Port Replicator, you will need to use an additional cable to convert from USB to RS232. Converting from USB is the least desired of all connections, as there will be more to the set up of software and more possibilities for communication driver conflicts. If you have to use a USB to RS232 converter, go with Allen Bradley’s UIC cable or PLCCables.com cable. Copyright 2014 by www.bin95.com 24
  25. 25. PLC Training by Business Industrial Network 11/02/2014 25 IMPORTANT! Click the Normal Protection Control button if you want to reuse the EEPROM Memory module. When you select “Store to EEPROM”, a dialog box will pop up, giving your two options to select from. Normal Protection, allows you to re-burn the EEPROM in the future if changes are made to the program. This is the default selection and should always be the one you choose. Write Only Protection, will prevent any future burning of the EEPROM, thus you will not have a way to save any future changes to the program. DO NOT SELECT THIS OPTION. Remember how in class the instructor showed you how to use EEPROM to have zero downtime from one of the most common causes. Copyright 2014 by www.bin95.com
  26. 26. PLC Training by Business Industrial Network 11/02/2014 26 This is another slide from bin95.com instructor based PLC training with tips, notes, and terminology as a reminder to what was covered in the workshop. Load Memory Module On Memory Error S:1/10 Upon cycling of power to the processor, if a memory error is detected in the RAM, the backup copy in EPROM will be automatically loaded into RAM and the processor will be placed back in REM RUN. So with S:1/10 bit set and EEPROM program copy kept current, your customer can have a normal operation with error from voltage spike going undetected and zero downtime. * Additional Note: Currently flash memory stick is the most stable offering possible, as it cannot scratch like a CD, it cannot be de-magnetized like a floppy disk, and is overall, fairly indestructible. Copyright 2014 by www.bin95.com
  27. 27. PLC Training by Business Industrial Network 11/02/2014 27 The instructor will show you in the actual RSLogix software, several real life program examples while explaining troubleshooting and how common instructions work. We will start with elements being highlighted, to show their “True” or “False” state. The Examine if Closed (XIC-’normally open contact’) and Examine if Open (XIO- ’normally close contact’) will be discussed. Moving on to timers, counters, and compare statements. This part of the class varies greatly depending on the classes experience level and questions. Copyright 2014 by www.bin95.com
  28. 28. 28 Another slide from our instructor based course you won’t see in other’s PLC courses, or in PLC training delivered via other medias… ***** SAFETY ***** BUSINESS INDUSTRIAL NETWORK DOES NOT PROMOTE THE USE OF FORCES! The difference between “forcing” a bit and “toggling” a bit is … When you “Force” a bit on or off, it over rides what condition the ladder logic is calling for and all failsafe the programmer designed in the logic. When you “Toggle” a bit, the very next scan cycle, the ladder logic is read and the bit is returned to the condition the ladder logic is calling for. So even though we toggle bits in class for demonstration and simulation purposes, in the real world with a running PLC, toggling a bit does not affect the machine in most cases. (because within one scan cycle, the bit’s original value is restored.) Copyright 2014 by www.bin95.com
  29. 29. PLC Training by Business Industrial Network 11/02/2014 This is a PAC. It looks like a PLC, but the important differences between a PLC and PAC are critical to know before working with one. Many do not know, surprisingly many other companies, and colleges delivering PAC training don’t even emphasize the difference to students. In short, the Process Automation Controller (PAC) is an Advanced PLC. More accurately it is structured like a computer and has a PLC built inside it as just one of the many functions. To learn more see http://bin95.com/PLC-PAC-Difference.htm Copyright 2014 by www.bin95.com 29
  30. 30. PLC Training by Business Industrial Network 11/02/2014 30 We also put extra slides in our on-site, and seminar powerpoints so attendees can continue to learn after instructor based training time has ran out. Like this slide… PLC - Program Logic Controller Used to control equipment. Symbol – A word that can be assigned to and be used in the place of an Address. (Example: Can type in a search field or edit field; S:1/15 or you can type “1st_scan_bit”. Both would be inter-replaceable.) Note: Rung descriptions, element descriptors, symbols, page titles, etc. are not saved inside the PLC. They are saved in the copy of the program on your computer only. PE - Photo Eye Copyright 2014 by www.bin95.com

×