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Revit Family_01_Overall

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Revit Family

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Revit Family_01_Overall

  1. 1. The Education and Research arm of the Building and Construction Authority BIM-02 Revit Family Creation BIM Tool Revit (2016) General Knowledge for Family Creation BIM Myanmar Training Centre
  2. 2. What is Revit Family The Education and Research arm of the Building and Construction Authority The Education and Research arm of the Building and Construction Authority
  3. 3. What is Familie? A family is a group of elements with a common set of properties, called parameters, and a related graphical representation. Different elements belonging to a family may have different values for some or all of their parameters, but the set of parameters (their names and meanings) is the same. These variations within the family are called family types or types. Example: Sprinkler Project Browser -> Families -> Element Category -> Family Type -> Instance All families can be two-dimensional, three-dimensional, or both, but not all families have to be parametric. Elements created with families that do not need more than one size or type may remain non-parametric. Duct and piping families are examples of 3D families, which display accordingly in isometric and plan views. Annotation detail families are examples of 2D families that do not require 3D representations
  4. 4. Revit Family System Family 3D Component 2D Annotation Loadable Family 3D Component 2D Annotation In-Place Family 3D Component Revit Family Types There are 3 kinds of families in Revit : ■ system families - create basic elements such as ducts, pipes, and other elements that you would assemble on site. ■ loadable families - families used to create both system components and some annotation elements. Loadable families create the components that would usually be purchased, delivered, and installed in and around a building, such as boilers, water heaters, air handlers, and plumbing fixtures. ■ in-place families - unique elements that you create when you need to create a unique component that is specific to the current project.
  5. 5. System Family and Loadable Family
  6. 6. Model In-place System Family and Loadable Family
  7. 7. System Family System Families These are basic components used to create a building project. Examples are ceilings, walls, floors, stairs, railings, ramps and topo surfaces (see Figure). They are also elements used in documentation such as levels, grids, callouts, tags and detail components. System families are built into the software and cannot be deleted. Their types, properties and behaviour are predefined by Revit and cannot be changed. They can, however, be duplicated to form new types with editable parameters. They also host component families that are hosted in other families, such as doors and windows.
  8. 8. Loadable Family Component Families These are models created outside the project environment using the Family Editor (Figure). They are loadable families that can be placed, duplicated, deleted and modified. They can be host-based or freestanding. Host-based families are components that attach or host to system families such as walls, ceilings, floors or any surface in the project environment. Creating component families is the main focus of this article.
  9. 9. Inplace Family In-Place Families: These families are components created in a project environment. The creation process is the same as creating a loadable family from scratch in the Family Editor. This process is accessed by clicking the Model In- Place command (Architecture>Build>Component) in a Project file. This feature is provided so users can create unique families specific to a project such as custom parapets, roof elements and casework. See the curved shelf in Figure. Figure. In-place family example, curved shelf. (Image courtesy of the author.) Figure. In-place family example, curved shelf. (Image courtesy of the author.) In-place families can be copied and pasted from project to project. When grouped, they can be saved outside the project as a loadable Revit family. This is how it is done: Create your in-place family (Architecture>Build>Component>Model In-Place) While in the editing mode, select and group your in-place components. (Create>Create Group). While still in the editing mode, select the grouped components then click the Application button (the R Revit logo on the top left); click Save As>Library>Group.
  10. 10. What is Revit Library The Education and Research arm of the Building and Construction Authority The Education and Research arm of the Building and Construction Authority
  11. 11. Revit Library Singapore Architecture MEP Structure Revit Library 1. 2. 3. 26. 25. 24. Loadable Family C:ProgramDataAutodeskRVT 2016
  12. 12. Revit Library (Component & Annotation) Component Annotation
  13. 13. What is Revit Category The Education and Research arm of the Building and Construction Authority The Education and Research arm of the Building and Construction Authority
  14. 14. Revit Category Model Category Annotation Category Analytical Model Categories Imported Category Revit Category
  15. 15. Instant Property & Type Property The Education and Research arm of the Building and Construction Authority The Education and Research arm of the Building and Construction Authority
  16. 16. When creating a project, you add parametric building elements to the design. Revit classifies elements by categories, families, and types. A category is a group of elements that you use to model or document a building design. Families are classes of elements in a category. A family groups elements with a common set of parameters (properties), identical use, and similar graphical representation. Different elements in a family may have different values for some or all properties, but the set of properties—their names and meaning— is the same. Each family can have several types. A type can be a specific size of a family, such as a 30” X 42” or A0 title block. A type can also be a style, such as default aligned or default angular style for dimensions. Instance Instances are the actual items (individual elements) that are placed in the project and have specific locations in the building (model instances) or on a drawing sheet (annotation instances). Family Category, Type & Instance
  17. 17. Instant Property Type Property Vs Instant Property and Type Property (Basic Wall)
  18. 18. Instant Property Type Property Instant Property and Type Property (Loadable Family) Vs
  19. 19. Instant Property and Type Property (Loadable Family)
  20. 20. Revit Parameter The Education and Research arm of the Building and Construction Authority The Education and Research arm of the Building and Construction Authority
  21. 21. Revit Parameter Family Parameter Instant Parameter Type Parameter Project Parameter Share Parameter Global Parameter Parameter
  22. 22. Project Parameter  Containers for information, can be defined and then added to multiple categories of elements in a project.  Specific to the project and cannot be shared with other projects.  Can be used those project parameters in multi-category or single-category schedules.  Manage tab > Settings panel (Project Parameters) 1 2 3
  23. 23. Parameter Property 8 5 6 9 10 11 7
  24. 24. Shares Parameter  can be used in multiple families or projects.  Shared parameters are definitions of parameters that you can add to families or projects. Shared parameter definitions are stored in a file independent of any family file or Revit project; this allows you to access the file from different families or projects.  The information defined in one family or project using the shared parameter is not automatically applied to another family or project using the same shared parameter.  In order for information in a parameter to be used in a tag, it must be a shared parameter. Shared parameters are also useful when you want to create a schedule that displays various family categories; without a shared parameter, you cannot do this. If you create a shared parameter and add it to the desired family categories, you can then create a schedule with these categories. This is called creating a multi-category schedule in Revit. 1 2
  25. 25. Shared Parameter Editing
  26. 26. Family Parameter 1. Always Vertical 2. Cut with voids when loaded 3. Share 4. OmniClass Number 5. OmniClass Tile 6. Room Calculation Point 7. Host
  27. 27. MEP System Additional Property The Education and Research arm of the Building and Construction Authority The Education and Research arm of the Building and Construction Authority
  28. 28. MEP Family Additional Property
  29. 29. 3D Component & 2D Legend The Education and Research arm of the Building and Construction Authority The Education and Research arm of the Building and Construction Authority
  30. 30. 3D Component and 2D Representation 2D Legend 2D Legend2D Legend2D Legend 3D Component 3D Component3D Component 3D Component
  31. 31. Family Editor The Education and Research arm of the Building and Construction Authority The Education and Research arm of the Building and Construction Authority
  32. 32. 1. Baluster 2. Casework 3. Column (Arc) 4. Curtain Panel 5. Date Device 6. Data Panel 7. Door 8. Duct Fitting 9. Electrical Equipment 10. Electrical Fixture 11. Entourage 12. Fire Alarm 13. Furniture 14. Furniture System 15. Generic 16. Lighting Fixture 17. Mechanical Equipment 18. Parking 19. Plumbing Fixture 20. Railing 21. Rebar Shape 22. RPC Family 23. Specialty Equipment 24. Sport Lighting 25. Structural Column 26. Structural Foundation 27. Structural Framing 28. Structural Stiffener 29. Structural Trusses 30. Site 31. Telephone Device 32. Window (Curtain) 33. Window Family Editor
  33. 33. User Interface Ribbon (Project) Family Editor (3D Component) Family Editor (2D Annotation) Family Editor (Mass)
  34. 34. Family Template The Education and Research arm of the Building and Construction Authority The Education and Research arm of the Building and Construction Authority
  35. 35. Families Template
  36. 36. Template Project Template Architecture Template Structure Template MEP System Template Family Template 3D Component Based Component Adaptive Profile 2D Annotation Combined System Tag Title Block Conceptual Mass Family Template Types i. Ceiling Based ii. Face Based iii. Floor Based iv. Line Based v. Patten Based vi. Roof Based vii. Two Level Based viii. Wall Based i. Profile Hosted ii. Profile Mullion iii. Profile Rail iv. Profile Reveal v. Profile Stair Nosing The software provides many templates, including those for all kinds of families, and lets you graphically draw the new family. The templates contain much of the information that you need to start creating the family and that Revit needs to place the family in projects.
  37. 37. Revit Reference Plane& Line The Education and Research arm of the Building and Construction Authority The Education and Research arm of the Building and Construction Authority
  38. 38. Reference Plane (Strong) when Strong Reference is assigned to a reference plane adjacent to a reference plane that has been assigned a Weak Reference, the dimension will snap to the Strong Reference first. http://www.engineering.com/BIM/ArticleID/11158/How-to-Use-Work-Planes-in-Revit.aspx
  39. 39. When a reference plane is named, it automatically becomes a work plane (e.g. top of cylinder). This named reference plane is added to the Name drop-down list from the Work Plane dialog box (see Figure), which is accessed by clicking the Set button (Create > Work Plane). n the Family Editor, reference planes are only visible in plan, elevation and section views. When loaded into a project, they are not visible and become the elements to which dimensions snap. When selected, a reference plane has a feature called Is Reference (see Figure). This feature determines the snapping hierarchy to which dimensions snap in a project. For example, when Strong Reference is assigned to a reference plane adjacent to a reference plane that has been assigned a Weak Reference, the dimension will snap to the Strong Reference first. The Is Reference drop-down list consists of the following: •Not a Reference (lowest in the hierarchy) •Strong Reference (highest in the hierarchy) •Weak Reference •Left •Center (Left/Right) •Right •Front •Center (Front/Back) •Back •Bottom •Center (Elevation) •Top Reference Plane http://www.engineering.com/BIM/ArticleID/11158/How-to-Use-Work-Planes-in-Revit.aspx
  40. 40. Reference Line Reference Line These are the solid green lines used as work planes in the Family Editor to overcome the limitations of the reference planes. Reference lines are used to control angular constraints and radial shapes of a family. Unlike reference planes, reference lines have start and end points that can be dimensioned. They are visible in all views. When selected, reference lines consist of four work planes (see Figure): two on the line perpendicular to each other (A) and one at each end perpendicular to the line (B). Faces of Existing Elements All surfaces of family components are work planes. A surface can be specifically assigned as the active work plane by clicking the Set button (Create > Work Plane) and choosing the “Pick a plane” option from the Work Plane dialog box. After clicking OK, any surface that is clicked becomes the active work plane. http://www.engineering.com/BIM/ArticleID/11158/How-to-Use-Work-Planes-in-Revit.aspx
  41. 41. What is Constrain The Education and Research arm of the Building and Construction Authority The Education and Research arm of the Building and Construction Authority
  42. 42.  Constraints build intelligence into the model, defining relationships and interdependencies between elements. Create constraints by applying locked dimensions and alignments, or attaching elements together (such as walls and roofs).  For example, you can specify that a door maintains a certain distance from a wall, or that a series of walls are equally spaced within a specified distance.
  43. 43.  About Equality Constraints  An equality constraint appears as an EQ symbol near the dimension line when you select a multi-segmented dimension.  Apply Constraints with Dimensions  Lock a permanent dimension to create a constraint.  Apply an Equality Constraint  Use an existing multi-segmented permanent dimension to create an equality constraint.  Change the Equality Display  Customize the default equality text label for multi-segmented dimensions.  Change the Default Equality Text Label  Change the default EQ label to custom text.  Define an Equality Formula  Define an alternative label for 2 or more consecutive and equal dimension segment values.  Remove Constraints  Avoid over-constraining a model by removing constraints that are not required.  Reveal Constraints  Take a temporary look at the dimension and alignment constraints in a view, to troubleshoot or modify elements in the model. .
  44. 44. How to create System Family The Education and Research arm of the Building and Construction Authority The Education and Research arm of the Building and Construction Authority
  45. 45. By Disciplines 1. Architectural Family 2. Structural Family 3. MEP 4. Generic Family System Family Creation How to create System Family 1. Duplicate from Existing & Customize 2. Project Transfer 3. Copy& Paste How to create Loadable Family 1. Duplicate from Existing & Customize 2. Download from Website, or from Others 3. Import from Other Format Revit Family System Family 3D Component 2D Annotation Loadable Family 3D Component 2D Annotation In-Place Family 3D Component
  46. 46. 1 2 3 4 5 System Family Creation (Basic Wall)
  47. 47. Graphic > Drawing Mode Appearance > Render Mode/ Realistic Drafting > 2D (Plan, Elevation, Section) Model > 3D (3D View) Can be imported .pat System Family Creation (Additional Setting)
  48. 48. Similar Setting in 1. Wall 2. Roof 3. Ceiling 4. Roof
  49. 49. Family Workflow The Education and Research arm of the Building and Construction Authority The Education and Research arm of the Building and Construction Authority
  50. 50. 1. Plan the family. 2. Create a new family (,rfa) using the appropriate family template. 3. Define Subcategories to control the visibility. 4. Create the family skeleton , or framework. a. i. Define the insertion point. b. Ii. Layout Reference Planes and Reference Lines. c. Iii. Add dimensions to specify parametric relationship. d. Iv. Label Dimensions to create type or instance parameters. e. v. Test, or flex the framework. f. vi. Specify different parameters g. vii. Add geometry in solids, voids and constraints h. Viii. Flex the model. i. ix. Load in the project j. x. Repeat previous steps until the family geometry is complete Workflow Plan • Types • Display • Host (optional) • Detail Level • Intersection Point/ Original Point Family Template • Based • Generic • Adoptive • Profile • Rebar • Mass Subcategories • Visibility Framework • Reference Plane/ Line • Dimension • Parameter • Instant& Type Property • Graphical Presentation
  51. 51. FAMILY TEMPLATE MODEL CATEGORY GEOMETRY CONSTRAIN REFERENCE PLANE AND LINES DIMENSIONS PARAMETER FAMILY PARAMETER TYPE INSTANCE SHARE PARAMETER TYPE INSTANCE VISIBILITY SUB CATEGORY 2D VIEWS LEDGEND GRAPHICAL COLOUR MATERIAL CONNECTOR & LOOK UP TABLE OTHERS FORMULA MODEL FAMILY CREATION
  52. 52. 3D Geometry The Education and Research arm of the Building and Construction Authority The Education and Research arm of the Building and Construction Authority
  53. 53. Solid Form (Extrusion)
  54. 54. Solid Form (Blend)
  55. 55. Solid Form (Blend)
  56. 56. Solid Form (Revolve)
  57. 57. Solid Form (Sweep)
  58. 58. Solid Form (Sweep)
  59. 59. Solid Form (Swept Blend)
  60. 60. Solid Form (Swept Blend)
  61. 61. Void Forms
  62. 62. Overall Process Project Architectural Components Structural Components M&E Components Project template Autodesk Template BCA Template Company Template Architectural Component Structural Component MEP Component Annotation Title Block Mass i. Hosted Family Template ii. Adaptive Family Template iii. Face Based Family Template iv. Floor Based Family Template v. Line Based Family Template vi. Pattern Based Family Template vii. Roof Based Family Template viii. Wall Based Family Template ix. Profile Family Template Generic Model Loadable Family Family template System Family
  63. 63. FAMILY TEMPLATE TAG CATEGORY DETAIL CONSTRAIN REFERENCE LINES DIMESIONS ANNOTATION LABEL CATEGORY PARAMETERS SHARE PARAMETER TEXT LABEL TEXT GRAPHICS FONT, SIZE, TEXT STYLE FORMULA ANNOTAION FAMILY CREATION Annotation Family Creation
  64. 64. Family Formula The Education and Research arm of the Building and Construction Authority The Education and Research arm of the Building and Construction Authority
  65. 65. Formulas for "Everyday" Use Table of contents No headers I´ve been building a lot of parametric content in Revit, and always enjoy the power of using formulas to drive and control things. So here´s a few examples that I´ve collected over time, and also some VERY recent additions (New rounding functions in Revit 2012). The basic operators (add, subtract, multiply, ect.) have been left out on purpose, but feel free to add more useful formulas, that you use in your families Exponentiation X raised to the power of Y = X ^ Y E raised to an x power E is a mathematical constant that is approximately equal to 2.7. It is an irrational number, but if we truncate it to 20 decimals it would be 2.7182818284590452353. Revit usage = exp(x) Circles with pi π Usage in Revit = pi() Circumference = pi() * (Radius * 2) Circumference = pi() * Diameter Circle Area = pi() * Radius ^ 2 Square Root Fixed value = sqrt(999) Parameter = sqrt(Width) Formula= sqrt(Width + Height)
  66. 66. Logarithm The logarithm of a number to a given base is the exponent to which the base must be raised in order to produce that number. For example, the logarithm of 1000 to base 10 is 3, because three factors of 10 must be multiplied to yield a thousand: 10 × 10 × 10 equals 1000 Revit usage = log(1000) Force yes/no parameters to be checked or unchecked Force checked = 1 < 2 Force unchecked = 1 > 2 Conditional statements Conditional statement uses this structure: IF (<condition>, <result-if-true>, <result-if-false>) Supported Conditional Operators < Less than > Greater than = Equal / Divide AND Both statements are true OR One of the statements is true NOT Statement is false Conditional statements can contain numeric values, numeric parameter names, and Yes/No parameters. Currently, <= and >= are not implemented. To express such a comparison, you can use a logical NOT. For example, a<=b can be entered as NOT(a>b)
  67. 67. Simple IF Statement IF (Length < 900, <true>, <false>) Formula That Returns Strings IF (Length < 900, “Opening too narrow”, “Opening OK”) Using logical AND IF ( AND (x = 1 , y = 2), <true>, <false>) Returns <true> if both x=1 and y=2, else <false> Using logical OR IF ( OR ( x = 1 , y = 2 ) , <true>, <false>) Returns <true> if either x=1 or y=2, else <false> Nested IF statements IF ( Length < 500 , 100 , IF ( Length < 750 , 200 , IF ( Length < 1000 , 300 , 400 ) ) ) Returns 100 if Length<500, 200 if Length<750, 300 if Length<1000 and 400 if Length>1000 IF with Yes/No condition Length > 40 Returns checked box (<true>) if Lenght > 40 NOT with Yes/No condition not(Viz) Returns checked box (<true>) if Yes/No parameter "Viz" is unchecked, and returns unchecked box (<false>) if Yes/No parameter "Viz" is checked.
  68. 68. IF AND OR Returning the greatest of three values Say you have these 3 length parameters, and want a fourth parameter to return the greates value/lenght of the 3: Length A Length B Length C Return Length (Returns the greatest of the three length parameters) Return Length = if(and(or(Length A > Length B, Length A = Length B), or(Length A > Length C, Length A = Length C)), Length A, if(and(or(Length B > Length A, Length B = Length A), or(Length B > Length C, Length B = Length C)), Length B, if(and(or(Length C > Length A, Length C = Length A), or(Length C > Length B, Length C = Length B)), Length C, 0 mm))) Another option is to use an extra "Calc" parameter, which is a bit more clumsy but also way easier and more manageable for us mortals. Calc = if(Length A > Length B, Length A, Length B) Return Length = if(Calc > Length C, Calc, Length C) And a third option: Return Length = if(A > D, if(A > C, if(A > B, A, B), if(B > C, B, C)), if(B > D, if(B > C, B, C), if(C > D, C, D)))
  69. 69. Trigonometry for right triangles: Known: a+b c = sqrt(a ^ 2 + b ^ 2) A = atan(a / b) B = atan(b / a) Known: a+c b = sqrt(c ^ 2 - a ^ 2) A = asin(a / c) B = acos(a / c) Known: b+c a = sqrt(c ^ 2 - b ^ 2) A = acos(b / c) B = asin(b / c) Known: c + A a = c * sin(A) b = c * cos(A) B = 90° - A Known: c + B a = c * cos(B) b = c * sin(B) A = 90° - B Known: a + B b = a * tan(B) c = a / cos(B) A = 90° - B Known: b + A a = b * tan(A) c = b / cos(A) B = 90° - A Known: a + A b = a / tan(A) c = a / sin(A) B = 90° - A Known: b + B a = b / tan(B) c = b / sin(B) A = 90° - B
  70. 70. Range of Values Given the following parameters: user_value: min_value: max_value: actual_value: = if (user_value < min_value, min_value, if (user_value > max_value, max_value, user_value)) Specify a range of valid entries, with the min_value and max_value parameters; then, use the actual value if it is within the range; otherwise, use your minimum or maximum values. Circular Segments. Here's how to calculate the Segment length, the Chord Length, the Angle etc. (Image should speak for itself)
  71. 71. Inconsistent Units Theres a seperate post explaining this behavior here: Revit - Inconsistent Units and how to neutralize them. Round Function In Formulas - New in Revit 2012 Values in formulas can be now rounded up or down. For example, when riser height is calculated, one needs the function “round” to find the appropriate value. ROUND(x) The round function returns a number rounded nearest to a whole number. It doesn’t take into consideration rounding direction (round up or down). If the number is (for example) from 24.5 to 24.9, the function rounds it to 25. If it is from 23.1 to 23.4, the function rounds it to 23. Examples: round ( 23.4) = 23 Round ( 23.5) = 24 Round ( 23.6) = 24 Round (-23.4) = -23 Round (-23.5) = -23 Round (-23.6) = -24 Syntax The syntax for the round function is: round( number) number is the number to round.
  72. 72. ROUNDDOWN(x) “x” is a unitless value that should return the largest integral value less than or equal to x. For example: rounddown ( 23.0) = 23 rounddown ( 23.5) = 23 rounddown ( 23.9) = 23 rounddown (-23.0) = -23 rounddown (-23.5) = -24 rounddown (-23.9) = -24 The syntax for the roundup function is: roundup (number) number is the number to round up. ROUNDUP(x) “x” is a unitless value that should return the smallest integral value greater than or equal to x. For example: roundup ( 23.0) = 23 roundup ( 23.5) = 24 roundup ( 23.9) = 24 roundup (-23.0) = -23 roundup (-23.5) = -23 roundup (-23.9) = -23 Note that when numbers such as 23.5 are rounded, they can result in either 23 or 24. To produce a stable result, for all the .5 cases, we round to the larger integer. That means that 23.5 is rounded to 24, while -23.5 to -23

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