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Overcoming Barriers to Creative Teenage Group Success

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This slideshare is the story of one educator's learning about what really gets in the way of successful group creativity for teens. Teens have a tough time. I know: I was one once! At a time when their intellectual focus is critical to their future success, hormones and social pressures make this very difficult. A few years ago I discovered that, if I ignored these pressures, I could prevent some pupils from achieving. Conversely, when I changed the way I facilitated creative projects to accommodate thinking about teams and emotional intelligence, alongside the subject-based skills and learning of the individual project, I began to see surprising results. The learning that came from this is now being applied in a new project-learning programme for schools. Enjoy the slideshow.

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Overcoming Barriers to Creative Teenage Group Success

  1. 1. BARRIERS Castle Walls © Bill C Martin 2009 To Group Music Success with 11-18s
  2. 2. ...and how to overcome them Berlin 1989. Photo: Gavin Andrew Stewart via Creative Commons
  3. 3. Teenage groups have always been based on:
  4. 4. age Blue Candles on Birthday Cake. Photo: Joey Gannon via Creative Commons
  5. 5. ability Photo © Bill C Martin, Schools Prom 2009
  6. 6. friendship groups
  7. 7. & in music: genre/ensemble Photo © Bill C Martin, National Festival of Music For Youth 2009
  8. 8. But there’s a PROBLEM:
  9. 9. In his work with teenage composing & performing groups, since 1989, music educator Bill Martin has noticed that...
  10. 10. Pupils are often reticent to engage fully with creative group tasks
  11. 11. Pupils are often reticent to engage fully with creative group tasks
  12. 12. HYPOTHESIS:
  13. 13. In extended group work...
  14. 14. ...it can be too challenging, personally, to take creative risks
  15. 15. WHY?
  16. 16. Able students can gain peer approval when they perform (low social risk) Photo: © Bill C Martin 2009
  17. 17. Uncertainty in creative group work means: Risk of losing status Photo: Graeme Maclean via Creative Commons
  18. 18. That’s why both able & less able pupils may lack confidence to take creative risks
  19. 19. The Social Risks
  20. 20. are just too great The Social Risks Photo: © Bill C Martin 2011, Holmfirth High School, parental permission obtained
  21. 21. Friendship groups? They seem safer but...
  22. 22. Many are based on similar personalities, tastes & preferences
  23. 23. Those similarities can cause territorial rivalries & clashes during concentrated projects
  24. 24. THE CHALLENGE
  25. 25. How can we minimise social/personal obstacles to musical group success?
  26. 26. MODELS FROM BUSINESS
  27. 27. Including: Meredith Belbin's work on management teams
  28. 28. And: Daniel Goleman's work on emotional intelligence
  29. 29. Meredith Belbin’s book: 'Management Teams: Why They Succeed or Fail' www.belbin.com
  30. 30. Belbin identifies:
  31. 31. Belbin identifies: 9 team roles in successful teams
  32. 32. Most successful teams:
  33. 33. 1 team role = 1 person Most successful teams:
  34. 34. 1 team role = 1 person No roles duplicated Most successful teams:
  35. 35. Belbin's original work was with adults.
  36. 36. Belbin's original work was with adults. In his PRS Composer-in-Education work (1989-93) Bill first tried a light-touch version (11-18s)
  37. 37. Just 5 team roles, equivalent to:
  38. 38. He formed some groups using team role preferences
  39. 39. In later projects he also used an emotional intelligence audit (Goleman) http://danielgoleman.info
  40. 40. to help young people improve their personal/social skills
  41. 41. & increase personal attainment in group work
  42. 42. Together, this changed
  43. 43. Regardless of pupils' musical or academic ability...
  44. 44. Regardless of pupils' musical or academic ability... …having sole responsibility for a team role increased confidence
  45. 45. Regardless of pupils' musical or academic ability... Pupils felt safer to contribute creative musical ideas
  46. 46. More pupils felt better able to:
  47. 47. More pupils felt better able to: Take creative personal risks
  48. 48. More pupils felt better able to: Take creative personal risks Support others' ideas without judgement
  49. 49. More pupils felt better able to: Take creative personal risks Support others' ideas without judgement Build rapport
  50. 50. More pupils felt better able to: Take creative personal risks Support others' ideas without judgement Build rapport Take pride in own team responsibilities
  51. 51. More pupils felt better able to: Take creative personal risks Support others' ideas without judgement Build rapport Take pride in own team responsibilities Contribute musically without fear
  52. 52. Academically less able pupils became more engaged
  53. 53. Academically less able pupils became more engaged More able pupils found it safer to venture creative/risky ideas
  54. 54. BILL’S REALISATION
  55. 55. “I had prevented some pupils from achieving...
  56. 56. “I had prevented some pupils from achieving... when I didn't attend to non-musical obstacles to engagement”
  57. 57. THE RESPONSE? (c 2013)
  58. 58. To work with schools & young people to explore & develop ways to:
  59. 59. 1. Increase pupil engagement 2. Raise pupils’ attainment
  60. 60. …through collaborative groups in authentic music-focussed projects
  61. 61. THE RESULT?
  62. 62. A partnership project between Bill C Martin & Elsium Solutions
  63. 63. A schools' project in which pupils: Design, Curate, & Perform music events.
  64. 64. Where music is the vehicle for a range of learning
  65. 65. Where music is the vehicle for a range of learning (not just music)
  66. 66. Where young people can develop the skills to overcome personal barriers to success
  67. 67. THE STRUCTURE
  68. 68. 4 strands:
  69. 69. 4 strands: 1. Musical communication
  70. 70. 4 strands: 2. Team/interpersonal skills
  71. 71. 4 strands: 3. Technical
  72. 72. 4 strands: 4. Staff CPD - covering everything
  73. 73. 1. Musical communication
  74. 74. 2. Team/interpersonal skills
  75. 75. 3. Technical
  76. 76. 4. Staff CPD
  77. 77. iPads are used:
  78. 78. As musical instruments (alongside other instruments & voices)
  79. 79. & to create video learning diaries & document the work
  80. 80. THE GOAL
  81. 81. To increase engagement & individual success
  82. 82. THE STRATEGY
  83. 83. Focus on: team roles, emotional intelligence & communication skills...
  84. 84. Focus on: team roles, emotional intelligence & communication skills to... overcome barriers to full engagement in the music & in other project teams
  85. 85. Options
  86. 86. 1day Weekend 3 days 5 days 1 term 2 terms 3 terms Shorter programmes focus more on music & iPads Longer programmes also develop team skills & emotional competences CHOOSE FROM:
  87. 87. Schools seeking improved pupil attainment or cultural change...
  88. 88. Schools seeking improved pupil attainment or cultural change... ...should choose programmes lasting 5 days or more
  89. 89. For further info: www.showcreatorproject.info Email: bill@billcmartin.co.uk

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