Hhc presentation

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Hhc presentation

  1. 1. Who participates in Learn toHunt and what it means for our future By: Jason Kool Robert Holsman, UWSP
  2. 2. Outline • The Learn to Hunt Program • Program Evaluation • Is the Program Effective? • Key Findings • Recommendations • Next StepsPhoto courtesy of Mark HirschPhotography
  3. 3. Background on Wisconsin’s Hunting Heritage• Among Wisconsin Hunters… – 92% hunt deer (550,000+) – 22% Wild turkey – 11% Migratory birds – 32% Small game • Pheasant—117,000 • Grouse – 77,000 • Rabbit 67,000 • Squirrel 60,000
  4. 4. A Strong Hunting Heritage at Risk• Wisconsin ranks 4th in hunting license sales• 2008 study predicts 25% decline by 2025• 2001 study indicated a 0.53 replacement ratio
  5. 5. What is Learn to Hunt?• A formal mentored hunting workshop… – Hunter Safety Certification is not required – Free license/tag for all participant hunters – One to One mentor / participant ratio
  6. 6. What is Learn to Hunt?• Each LTH event has… – Minimum 4 hours of classroom time • Firearms safety briefing • Technical hunting skills and methods training • Species ecology and management education – Field Hunt
  7. 7. Species Number of events on our record in 2010Wild Turkey 63Pheasant 14Gun Deer 6Waterfowl 5Bear 3Dove 1Bow Deer 1Total 93
  8. 8. Program Evaluation• Assess program “effectiveness”• Mixed methods – Mentor focus groups – Interviews of past participants – Surveys to 2010 participants – Participant observation
  9. 9. What is the goal of Learn to Hunt? “Provide a safe andpositive first time hunting experience with a qualified mentor.” Photo courtesy of Mark Hirsch Photography
  10. 10. Is Learn to Hunt “Effective”?• 2006-2007 Learn to Hunt Participants – Bought licenses the following year at a rate of 91-96%!
  11. 11. Is Learn to Hunt “Effective?”• The Learn to Hunt program is “effective!” – Happy photos guide belief that program is “being effective” – 4.1 rating on 5 point scale
  12. 12. “Effective” at What?
  13. 13. Effective at Finding Hunters• Participants had hunted before to coming to LTH – 70% of Spring participants hunted before LTH – 40% of Fall participants hunted before LTH• 78% of Spring LTH Participant Dad’s hunt• 83% of Fall LTH Participant Dad’s hunt
  14. 14. Effective at Finding Hunters • Participants are coming from AVID hunting families Number of Prior Hunting Activities 20% 18% 18% 16% 16% 16% 15%Percent of Participants 14% 13% 12% 11% 11% 10% 10% 10% 10% 9% 9% 8% 8% 6% Spring 2010 LTH 6% 5% 5% 4% 4% 4% 4% Fall 2010 4% 3% LTH 2% 3% 2% 1% 1% 1% 0% 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 Number of Activities
  15. 15. Effective at Finding Hunters• Program sponsors tend to recruit participants from hunter safety classes• Why? – Uneasiness with accepting uncertified participants – It’s convenient – Haven’t thought about the need to broaden reach – Lack ability to attract new audience
  16. 16. Effective at Finding Hunters• Youth from hunting backgrounds– “The Choir” • Already get exposure • Probably have family support • Likely come from rural areas (cultural supported) – May be at-risk of non-initiation anyway • Parental desertion or churn • Changing view of parent’s role (others teach your kids) • May not want to forego own opportunity to invest • Provide experience that they can’t
  17. 17. Effective as a “Guided Hunt”• Go to an event• Meet a stranger• Go on a morning, afternoon or weekend hunt – Hunt on private property lined up by “mentor” – Taxi v. Drivers Ed. Photo courtesy of Mark Hirsch Photography
  18. 18. Effective at Recruiting Youth Ages of 2010 LTH Participants 60.00% 56% 50% 50.00%Percent of Participants 40.00% Spring 2010 36% LTH 30.00% 29% Fall 2010 LTH 20.00% 10.00% 7% 5% 5% 3% 2% 2% 3% 1% 0.00% 9-11yrs 12-15yrs 16-20 yrs 21-30yrs 31-40 yrs 40+ yrs Years
  19. 19. Other Key Findings• I’m interested in hunting because… 1) I want to spend time outside- 86% 2) I want to spend time with family- 85% 3) I want to use different types of equipment- 85% 4) I think I could be good at it- 83% 5) I want to learn more about wildlife- 80%
  20. 20. Other Key Findings• Technology use – 49% have a Facebook profile – 68% use YouTube to watch videos• Unsure about joining online “friends” group – 31% Yes – 39% Unsure – 29% No Photo courtesy of Mark Hirsch Photography
  21. 21. Other Findings • Males are the primary participants 2010 LTH Participants 500Number of Participants 450 Spring 400 2010 350 LTH 300 250 200 Fall 150 2010 100 LTH 50 0 Male Female Gender
  22. 22. Declining Hunters LLTH Program LInputs Outputs Outcomes•Marketing •Hold events•Reimbursements •1,000+ participate •???????•Gear donations •Positive •Continuation•Volunteers experiences•Special seasons Enjoyment Confidence Motivation
  23. 23. So where should we focus?
  24. 24. Who is the target audience?• Youth from non-hunting backgrounds– “True youth novices” – What happens to them after event? • No money • Can’t drive • Lack behavioral autonomy to make own decisions • Apprenticeship far from completed – Limited duration programs should not target this group • Either need to change format to longer duration • Or pick a different audience
  25. 25. Who is the target audience?• Adults from non-hunting backgrounds – Cuts against the grain of tradition • “Hunters come from hunting families” • Less common to acquire hobbies in adulthood – May be harder to find participants• Have money, can drive, behavioral control• Also may be raising kids
  26. 26. Youth Adults Non-white youth Non-white adults with without familial limited hunter-social hunters network Without familial Locavores/Foodies hunterswith non-hunting Have parents/parent(s), but close siblings hunthunting relative Who have co- With infrequent workers who hunt hunting parentsWith avid hunting Who already fishparent (one) Spouses of Youth with avid existing hunting parents hunters (both)
  27. 27. Don’t Forget Those Closest To You Photo courtesy of Delta Waterfowl First Hunt Mentor Manual (pg 20)
  28. 28. Four recommendations:1) Develop measurable outcomes2) Prioritize audience segments3) Move from guides to mentors4) Learner-centered education
  29. 29. 1) Develop Measurable Outcomes• Is it to increase license sales?• Is it to provide exposure to hunting?• Is it to bring in a new non-traditional audience?• Is it to retain the base we have in the activity?• Is it all these things?
  30. 30. 2) Prioritize Audience Segments• Learn to Hunt inadvertently branded as “youth hunts” – Participants recruitment reinforces this image – Many events held in conjunction with youth seasons
  31. 31. 2) Prioritize Audience Segments• Program logic of youth intervention fails without support – Lack income – Can’t drive – Lack autonomy Photo courtesy of Mark Hirsch Photography• Don’t forget the adults
  32. 32. 3) Move from “Guides” to “Mentors” • True mentoring requires extended multiple contacts • True mentoring requires the building of a relationship • Effective mentoring needs a long-term commitment – Research shows only way to “create a hunter” • Keep parents involved
  33. 33. 4) Learner Centered Education• Understand “one-shot” wonders play a limited role in “becoming a hunter”• Focus on “becoming a hunter” rather than “going hunting”• Age appropriate teaching methods and activities
  34. 34. Photo courtesy of Mark Hirsch Photography So What’s Next?  WI DNR 1.5 positions  Sabbatical- develop a planning process  2nd Hunting Heritage Conference  Follow up survey of participants in 5 years
  35. 35. This project is supported by the 2010 Hunting HeritagePartnership, a grant program of the National Shooting Sports Foundation, Inc.
  36. 36. Questions• Robert Holsman, Ph.D – UW- Stevens Point – Associate Professor of Wildlife – rholsman@uwsp.edu – (715) 346-4546• Jason Kool – South Dakota Game, Fish and Parks – Recruitment and Retention Coordinator – jason.kool@state.sd.us – (605) 773-8162

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