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Collin County Regional Trails Master Plan

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Collin County Regional Trails Master Plan

  1. 1. A  Collaborative  Multi-­‐Jurisdictional  Planning  Effort     Texas  Trails  &  Active  Transportation  Conference   February  3,  2012  
  2. 2. —  Methods  used  to  gain  stakeholder  input  —  An  overview  of  the  planning  process  —  Development  of  a  large  and  robust  GIS  database  —  Use  of  mobile  GIS  technology  —  Lessons  learned  during  the  project.  
  3. 3. —  Inventory  of  Existing  Trails,  Generators,  and  Attractors  —  User  Groups  (Who’s  your  target?)  —  Needs  Assessment   —  Public  Input  (Citizen  Demand)   —  Level  of  Service   —  Latent  Demand   —  Network  Connectivity   —  Opportunities  —  Facility  Typologies  &  Standards  —  Network  Design  —  Route  Segment  Analysis  —  Priorities  and  Cost  Estimates  
  4. 4. Develop  a  Collin  County  Regional  Trails  Master  Plan  that  provides  coordination  and  connectivity  between  cities  within  the  County  for  future  trail  development.    
  5. 5. —  Objectives   —  Build  upon  the  planning  efforts  of  member  cities  and   other  regional  studies.   —  Define  high-­‐priority  corridors  that  connect  two  or  more   cities  within  or  adjacent  to  Collin  County  to  encourage   corridor  preservation  and  multi-­‐jurisdictional   implementation.   —  Identify  and  address  gaps  and  primary  potential  trail   connections  between  cities  in  order  to  provide  intercity   linkages.  
  6. 6. —  Objectives  (continued)   —  Ensure  that  every  city  and  town  in  the  County  is   connected  to  the  Collin  County  Regional  Trail  System.   —  Recommend  design  guidelines  and  facility  hierarchy  for   the  Regional  Trail  System.   —  Provide  a  tool  that  gives  guidance  to  Collin  County  for   evaluating  funding  requests  and  coordinating  trail   projects  with  other  capital  projects.  
  7. 7. —  Allen   —  Lavon   —  Princeton  —  Anna   —  Lowry  Crossing   —  Prosper  —  Blue  Ridge   —  Lucas   —  Richardson  —  Carrollton   —  McKinney   —  Royse  City  —  Celina   —  Melissa   —  Sachse  —  Dallas   —  Murphy   —  Saint  Paul  —  Fairview   —  Nevada   —  The  Colony  —  Farmersville  —  Frisco   —  New  Hope   —  Van  Alstyne  —  Garland   —  Parker   —  Weston  —  Josephine   —  Plano   —  Wylie  
  8. 8. —  Transportation  Agencies   —  TxDOT   —  DART   —  NTTA  —  Utility  Owners   —  Oncor   —  NTMWUD  —  Other  Regional  Agencies   —  US  Army  Corps  of  Engineers  (water  bodies)   —  NCTCOG  (coordination  with  adjacent  areas)  
  9. 9. —  Municipal  Agencies   —  Worksessions  (day-­‐long  summits)   —  Presentation   —  Location-­‐based  breakout  groups   —  Hands-­‐on  map  review     —  Off-­‐line  (on-­‐line)  coordination   —  Rounds  of  map  distribution  and  review   —  Tap  into  local  knowledge   —  Maintain  accuracy  as  time  progresses  —  Non-­‐Municipal  Agencies     —  Coordination  worksession  with  all  
  10. 10. —  Demographic  and  Growth  Forecast  Analysis  —  Inventory  of  Key  Destinations  —  Review  of  Existing  &  Planned  Trails  —  Opportunities  and  Constraints  Analysis  
  11. 11. 2030  2020  2010  2000   2020   010   2010  -­‐ 2030   2000  -­‐    2020  Density   Growth  
  12. 12. —  Regional  and  Local  Parks,  Open   Spaces,  and  Lakes  —  Schools  (K–8  /  9–12)  —  Public  and  Civic  Facilities  —  Recreation  Centers  and  Facilities  —  Major  Employers  (250+  employees)  
  13. 13. Garla
  14. 14. —  City  Trail  Systems,  Trail  Plans,  and  Published  Trail   Standards  —  Existing  Conditions   —  269  Miles  of  Existing/Programmed  Trails  in  the  County   —  727  Miles  of  Planned/Proposed  Trails  in  the  County  
  15. 15. —  Identify  Major  Trail  Corridors  —  Analyze  Intercity  Connection  Points  —  Guidelines  for  Regional  Trails  —  Governmental  Agency  Input  and  Review  —  Recommendations  &  Final  Report  —  Public  and  Elected  Official  Review  —  Distribution  of  Plan  and  Data  to  Cities  
  16. 16. Existing/Programmed  Planned/Proposed   Total  Hard  Surface   228.4   656   884.4  Soft  Surface   22.1   48.7   70.8  Equestrian   16.9   15.5   32.4  Mixed  Surface   1.3   6.8   8.1  Collin  County  Proposed*   n/a   163   163  Total   268.7   890   1,158.7   Existing/Programmed   Planned/Proposed  Total  Major  Trail  Corridors**   76.7   431   507.7  *Major  Trail  Corridors  that  do  not  overlap  any  other  existing  or  planned  facility  **For  Major  Trail  Corridors,  include  the  portion  that  follows  the  railroad  west  of  the  County  Line  through  Frisco,  The  Colony,  and  Carrollton  
  17. 17. 2010*   2040   (782,341)   (1,526,634)  Hard  Surface   3,425   1,726  Soft  Surface   35,400   21,563  Equestrian   46,292   47,118  Mixed  Surface   601,801   188,473  Total   2,912   1,318  *2010  United  States  Census  Redistricting  Data  **NCTCOG  2040  Population  Estimate  
  18. 18. —  Number  of  points   analyzed:  32  —  Mostly  in  southwest   quadrant  due  to   more  challenging   physical  constraints  
  19. 19. Multi-­‐Use  Trail  Types   Minimum   Minimum   Notes   Tread  Width   Corridor   Width  Urbanized   12’   20’   Concrete;  width  depending   upon  adjacent  densities  and  Exclusive  ROW  in  Higher   (14’-­‐16’  pref.)   (32’  pref.)   volume  of  use  Density  Areas  Greenway   10’   25’   Concrete  or  pervious  pavement   in  ecologically  sensitive  areas  Natural  Areas  in  an  Urban   (12’  pref.)   (32’  pref.)  Environment  Two-­‐way  Sidepath   10’   18’   Concrete;  includes  shoulders   and  a  5’  buffer  between  path  Along  a  Roadway   (12’  pref.)   (25’  pref.)   and  roadway    Pioneer  Trail   8’   25’   Corridor  preservation;     natural  surface  or  asphalt  Rural  Areas   (10’  pref.)   (32’  pref.)   acceptable  
  20. 20. —  Verified  Corridor  Locations  —  Identification  of  Grade-­‐Separated  Crossing  Challenges  —  ArcPAD  and  GPS-­‐Enabled  Camera  
  21. 21. —  A  project  of  this  type  is  more  about  facilitation  than   planning.  —  The  accuracy  of  GIS  is  dependant  on  the  accuracy  of   your  data.   —  Data  created  for  different  reasons  by  different   organizations  have  differing  levels  of  accuracy.  —  Larger  municipalities  with  greater  resources  are  often   very  willing  to  help  smaller  towns.  —  A  few  hours  spent  with  your  neighbors  can  help  you   for  years  to  come.  

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