July 11, 2009<br />ALA Annual Conference Chicago, IL<br />The Open Library Environment Project:<br />Building an ILS for S...
Tweet our Session<br />Follow OLE on twitter @oleproject<br />Tags<br />#ala09<br />#ala2009<br />#lita<br />#etig<br />#o...
Poll Anywhere<br />3 Ways to Poll <br />Text a code to 99503 = sms txt 99503 “code”<br />Tweet a code to @poll = @poll “co...
Poll #1<br />In ten years, if it isn’t digital, it will be invisible.<br />Text a code to 99503 = sms txt 99503 “code”<br ...
OLE and Mellon<br />OLE has been funded by the OLE partners and the  Andrew W Mellon Foundation’s Research in Information ...
Overview<br />What is OLE and What Has OLE Been Doing for 12 Months?<br />Community Source Software and Governance!<br />E...
OLE Overview<br /><ul><li>What is the OLE Project?
Community source alternative to current ILS
International participation from libraries and consortia
100+ institutions, 350+ individuals, 10+ regional workshops, multiple webcasts and presentations
Planning phase: September ‘08 – July ‘09</li></ul>July 11, 2009<br />ALA Annual Conference Chicago, IL<br />ALA Annual Con...
Why OLE Now?<br />	Our current library business technologies cost too much and deliver too little. We need to rethink our ...
Our Institutions Change<br />July 11, 2009<br />ALA Annual Conference Chicago, IL<br />Enterprise financial systems<br />E...
Our Users are Changing<br />Library technology systems have not kept pace with changing users and a changing information e...
Scenario<br />July 11, 2009<br />ALA Annual Conference Chicago, IL<br />Economist researcher<br />OLE Campus<br />Manages ...
Scenario<br />July 11, 2009<br />ALA Annual Conference Chicago, IL<br />Professor uses one of many access portals <br />OL...
Scenario<br />July 11, 2009<br />ALA Annual Conference Chicago, IL<br />Payment options<br />Delays noted (Recall, purchas...
Scenario<br />July 11, 2009<br />ALA Annual Conference Chicago, IL<br />GPS-enabled<br />Original Search and mapping combi...
OLE Principles<br /><ul><li>Flexibility
   Community Ownership
   Service Oriented Architecture
   Enterprise-Level Integration
   Efficiency
   Sustainability</li></ul>Which of these do you see as being critical for the future of your library?<br />July 11, 2009<...
Poll #2<br />Which of these do you see as being critical to the future of your library?<br />http://www.polleverywhere.com...
Where we’ve been<br /><ul><li>Regional Design Workshops
Did you or your staff attend a workshop?
350+ people from 100+ institutions!
Who attended?</li></ul>July 11, 2009<br />ALA Annual Conference Chicago, IL<br />
Where we’ve been<br /><ul><li>Project team meetings
Webinars
Community information sharing
Review information on the project website, oleproject.org</li></ul>July 11, 2009<br />ALA Annual Conference Chicago, IL<br />
Where We Are Today?<br /><ul><li>Scope Document
Vision
Principles
Functional Scope
Architecture
Governance</li></ul>July 11, 2009<br />ALA Annual Conference Chicago, IL<br />
Where We Are Today?<br /><ul><li>Project Assumptions
OLE will provide services that will help academic & research institutions accomplish their core mission by improving the l...
OLE provides a transformative opportunity to the institution through its support of a more collaborative approach to resea...
OLE will enable libraries to be more of a component with the enterprise infrastructure raising the relevance of libraries ...
Libraries are core to the research institution.
Adopting a model of community-source software development and a technology infrastructure based on service orientation is,...
Where We Are Today?<br /><ul><li>Project assumptions (cont.)
Business workflows at peer libraries are more similar than they are different.
Libraries need to be able to leverage a dynamic information environment to support the research and educational mission of...
Digital formats will dominate our business processes.
Collaborative and consortial activity is increasingly as important to libraries as work at local institutions.
Library business processes will increasingly involve interactions with external service providers and consumers.</li></ul>...
Where We Are Today?<br />ALA Annual Conference Chicago, IL<br />July 11, 2009<br /><ul><li>ILS Market
Community Source
Governance</li></li></ul><li>Why OLE Now?<br /><ul><li>Current ILS products are inadequate
Growing need for library systems to interact with other enterprise systems
Vendor consolidation constrains choices
Libraries need to control their own destinies</li></ul>July 11, 2009<br />ALA Annual Conference Chicago, IL<br />
Current Academic ILS Market<br />Ex Libris/Endeavor - 1465<br />Voyager - 862<br />Aleph 500 – 603<br />Innovative Interfa...
ALA Annual Conference Chicago, IL<br />July 11, 2009<br />Legacy ILS Functionality<br />Public User <br />Interface:<br />...
ALA Annual Conference Chicago, IL<br />July 11, 2009<br />Current ILS<br />Legacy ILS Functionality+eContentModule+Advance...
ALA Annual Conference Chicago, IL<br />July 11, 2009<br />SOA Models for ILS?<br />Composite<br />Applications<br />Reusab...
Community Source Projects<br />In traditional open source development the software code is made available for inspection a...
ALA Annual Conference Chicago, IL<br />July 11, 2009<br />Open Source Projects<br />From - http://blogs.the451group.com/op...
Community Source and OLE<br />Community Source Projects<br />Have sustainability over the course of the product developmen...
ALA Annual Conference Chicago, IL<br />July 11, 2009<br />Governance Options<br /><ul><li>Institution-based
e.g. University of Michigan DLXS
e.g. LOCKSS
Community-based
More established: Sakai, Kuali
Emerging: DSpace, Fedora Commons
Try to join an existing organizational framework?
Where do libraries fit in an enterprise academic environment?</li></li></ul><li>ALA Annual Conference Chicago, IL<br />Jul...
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OLE Project at ALA 2009 LITA Emerging Technologies Interest Group

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The Open Library Environment Project (OLE Project): Building an ILS for Service Oriented Architecture Integration. Sponsored by LITA Emerging Interest Group for ALA 2009 Chicago.

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  • What is OLE?The OLE project is intended to help libraries control their own destinies by shaping the technology systems that support their core mission, using technology that is open, flexible and governed by the library community. The OLE Project will produce a community source alternative to current ILSs, better suited to modern library workflows and designed to inter-operate with enterprise-level business and content applications beyond the library.======================Community Source AlternativeOLE will use open, flexible technology to produce a community-sourced alternative to current ILS. OLE will be open source software, but developed using a community source model. Community source limits initial development efforts to partners who have committed financial and/or human resources for the duration of the development cycle. Once the initial release of the software is deployed, one of the benefits of open source is that it allows developers to modify the code to meet their institution’s particular functional requirements. Ideally, those changes are funneled back to the larger OLE community and, where appropriate, incorporated into future releases.   ==============Planning Phase & International Participation:With support from The Andrew W. Mellon Foundation, an international group of research libraries began working with the library community in September 2008 to plan the project. Project participants are developing system requirements and an initial design document, to be ready in July 2009. The next steps are to develop a project proposal and seek funding for development of the OLE software. The aim is to have a reference implementation available by mid  2011.The planning phase project team consists of representatives from libraries of different sizes, public and private institutions and varied U.S. and international locations. Partners were chosen for their ability to contribute to both functional and technical planning for community source SOA projects, for their influence in the library community and for their experience in library innovation relevant to this project. By including a wide variety of people and institutions, we increase the likelihood that our design document will reflect the full range of library needs and that we will have a community highly motivated and well prepared as we move towards the build phase.
  • Why OLE Now?Current ILS products are inadequate. This project grew out of a series of conversations about the problems libraries were experiencing with their current Integrated Library Systems. The closed, proprietary, tightly integrated systems that helped library efficiency 15 or 20 years ago now impose workflows that restrict rather than support the activities libraries need to do. Libraries are spending time and money trying to work around the systems they have purchased. There is a growing need for library systems to interact with other enterprise systems.Many libraries have implemented new enterprise student information systems, personnel directory management systems and purchasing systems since the current ILS systems were developed. Many colleges and universities have enterprise-wide course management systems which serve as critical access points to information and research projects, but the ILS typically does not integrate with course management systems. Libraries need to be able to interact with other enterprise systems in order to provide the best possible experience for learners and researchers.Vendor consolidation constrains choices.Many libraries also believe that current ILS’s are nearing the end of their lifecycle and will need to be replaced within the next few years. Given the number of vendors who have gone out of business, have been purchased or have fallen behind in their delivery of promised new systems, it seems likely that there will be fewer rather than more choices of ILS products offered by commercial providers in the future.Libraries need to control their own destinies.To remain strong in a rapidly changing information environment, libraries need to be able to modify their technology to fit evolving needs and to ensure that their technology systems support changing workflows rather than being controlled by outdated and inflexible systems. The current economic downturn makes it more critical than ever that libraries be able to change and adapt quickly. The OLE Project is intended to help libraries control their own destinies by shaping the technology systems that support their core mission, using technology that is open, flexible and controlled by the library community.A detailed rationale is available in the proposal document which is posted on our website. I hope you will take time to read it and will share your ideas by posting comments on the website or sending email to the OLE listserv.
  • Why OLE Now?Current ILS products are inadequate. This project grew out of a series of conversations about the problems libraries were experiencing with their current Integrated Library Systems. The closed, proprietary, tightly integrated systems that helped library efficiency 15 or 20 years ago now impose workflows that restrict rather than support the activities libraries need to do. Libraries are spending time and money trying to work around the systems they have purchased. There is a growing need for library systems to interact with other enterprise systems.Many libraries have implemented new enterprise student information systems, personnel directory management systems and purchasing systems since the current ILS systems were developed. Many colleges and universities have enterprise-wide course management systems which serve as critical access points to information and research projects, but the ILS typically does not integrate with course management systems. Libraries need to be able to interact with other enterprise systems in order to provide the best possible experience for learners and researchers.Vendor consolidation constrains choices.Many libraries also believe that current ILS’s are nearing the end of their lifecycle and will need to be replaced within the next few years. Given the number of vendors who have gone out of business, have been purchased or have fallen behind in their delivery of promised new systems, it seems likely that there will be fewer rather than more choices of ILS products offered by commercial providers in the future.Libraries need to control their own destinies.To remain strong in a rapidly changing information environment, libraries need to be able to modify their technology to fit evolving needs and to ensure that their technology systems support changing workflows rather than being controlled by outdated and inflexible systems. The current economic downturn makes it more critical than ever that libraries be able to change and adapt quickly. The OLE Project is intended to help libraries control their own destinies by shaping the technology systems that support their core mission, using technology that is open, flexible and controlled by the library community.A detailed rationale is available in the proposal document which is posted on our website. I hope you will take time to read it and will share your ideas by posting comments on the website or sending email to the OLE listserv.
  • Behind the scenes the process appears seamless and effortless but the discovery interface, working with OLE, enables …
  • Poll: Which of the following do you see as being very important for the future of your library? (use the six things Mike talked about as one word descriptions of what OLE offers, e.g. flexibility, community ownership, service orientation, enterprise level integration, efficiency, sustainability)briefly describe how OLE addresses each of these six things.Principles that underlie the OLE framework are:Flexibility: Supports a wide range of resources, accessed by a wide range of customers, in a variety of contexts, and provides structures for extending and adding new types of resources, customers and contexts. Community ownership: Designed, built, owned, and governed by and for the library community on an open source licensing basis; sustained by the community with the assistance of a thriving vendor marketplace; evolving over time through transparent processes that enable and respond to input and innovation from the community. Service Orientation: Developed using the methods of Service Oriented Architecture (SOA) and implemented with Web Services to be a modular and technology-neutral framework that ensures the interoperability of library business systems and accommodates a diversity of solutions without the risks posed by single source providers. Capable of customization to support local needs. Enterprise-Level Integration: Designed to adapt to and integrate with other enterprise systems such as research support, student information, human resources, identity management, fiscal control, and repository and content management. Efficiency: Provides a modular application infrastructure that integrates with new and existing academic and research technologies and business processes for improved efficiency and effectiveness of the institution, and which meets current and future business needs of the community. Sustainability: Creates a reliable and robust framework for the identification, documentation, innovation, development, maintenance, and review of software necessary to furthering the operation and mission of libraries.
  • Regional Design Workshops- Held from November ‘08 through January ’09- Goals Share OLE and its long-term objectives with a broader library audience Introduce the concept of SOA and BPM Identify the most critical library processes Create workflows of those processes which will be synthesized by the core project team Envision the system of the future (Blue Sky). What would it look like? Create a buzz and get buy-in from universities not currently involved in the projectPoll: How many of today’s participants attended a Regional Design Workshop? 350+ people from 95 institutions at 11 regional workshopshttp://oleproject.org/workshops/
  • - Meet regularly (conference calls, document sharing, face-to-face) Group meets in person every two months for intensive work sessions Last two meetings: January at Lehigh University, March at University of Kansas==================== Webinars are used to provide updates to the greater community and gather feedback and input Every 6-8 weeks So far: 350+ individuals from 170+ institutions in webcasts==================== Community Information sharing - Interaction with broad audience at 25+ conferences, panels
  • 1st Year Deliverable that will be implementable – ERM module – Resource Sharing – Acquisitions – Show more Kuali RiceSay we have a business plan and we are ready to share it -
  • Why OLE Now?Current ILS products are inadequate. This project grew out of a series of conversations about the problems libraries were experiencing with their current Integrated Library Systems. The closed, proprietary, tightly integrated systems that helped library efficiency 15 or 20 years ago now impose workflows that restrict rather than support the activities libraries need to do. Libraries are spending time and money trying to work around the systems they have purchased. There is a growing need for library systems to interact with other enterprise systems.Many libraries have implemented new enterprise student information systems, personnel directory management systems and purchasing systems since the current ILS systems were developed. Many colleges and universities have enterprise-wide course management systems which serve as critical access points to information and research projects, but the ILS typically does not integrate with course management systems. Libraries need to be able to interact with other enterprise systems in order to provide the best possible experience for learners and researchers.Vendor consolidation constrains choices.Many libraries also believe that current ILS’s are nearing the end of their lifecycle and will need to be replaced within the next few years. Given the number of vendors who have gone out of business, have been purchased or have fallen behind in their delivery of promised new systems, it seems likely that there will be fewer rather than more choices of ILS products offered by commercial providers in the future.Libraries need to control their own destinies.To remain strong in a rapidly changing information environment, libraries need to be able to modify their technology to fit evolving needs and to ensure that their technology systems support changing workflows rather than being controlled by outdated and inflexible systems. The current economic downturn makes it more critical than ever that libraries be able to change and adapt quickly. The OLE Project is intended to help libraries control their own destinies by shaping the technology systems that support their core mission, using technology that is open, flexible and controlled by the library community.A detailed rationale is available in the proposal document which is posted on our website. I hope you will take time to read it and will share your ideas by posting comments on the website or sending email to the OLE listserv.
  • Stage one (O in Ian’s graphic)Denial.Stage two (1 in Ian’s graphic)The vendor begins to make use of open source software internally as part of its ongoing research and development process, realizing that it can save money on non-differentiating code and improve interoperability.Stage three (2 in Ian’s graphic)There is a realization that open source is a two-way street and that to get the most out of the software it is using the vendor needs to contribute back to the process, helping to improve the overall quality of the code and making further savings on not having to support forked code.Stage four (3 in Ian’s graphic)The vendor begins to champion specific projects, and the open source approach in general, as it begins to see the full value of collaborating with partners and competitors in the development process.Stage five (the right side of the dotted line)Up until now the process has been largely led by engineering. The realization of greater value pushes the vendor over a line to realize that open source engagement needs to be business-led, rather than engineering-led. It begins to engage in multiple projects and realizes the true business benefits of open source engagement.That’s my take anyway. Ian will no doubt have more insight. One of the reasons this works so well is that you can think of a vendor engaged in community-led open source development and pretty easily plot them on this chart.As Ian notes in the comments below, the chart can also be used to track the engagement in open source communities of enterprise users, as well as vendors.Here’s an interesting experiment: where would you place Microsoft?
  • Building community first allows flexibility for long-term development and provides a strategy for sustainability
  • One of the first steps in working towards a service oriented architecture is creating a map of our desired business processes. Before we do that, we need to have an overview of what we do, and especially what we do that is a required process for any future system. To do this, and the major goal of this workshop, we need to create business process models.Business process modeling is essentially a way to write down what we do. We start from a high level and describe the functions we perform and then we break these down into step by step descriptions. We’ve already created our list of core and significant processes, so we know what we’ll be dissecting.Our next set of exercises involves taking some of those processes and describing it in detail which will include each step, contingencies that happen during the process and start and end points
  • Here’s an example of a process being modeled. There is no sound. This uses a system called business process modeling notation which involves using boxes, triangles, and arrows to model out the process. Although you may certainly model your process to this detail, it is not necessary. We’re more concerned that you write down the steps.
  • Here is an example of a process. As you can see, this group used boxes and arrows to show how the process worked and where dependencies caused things to change (top broken off process and bottom broken off process).
  • What will our environment look like in 2 years – less vendors – less options – where can we manage legacy content?
  • Which of these would be the most important to your organization?
  • Add Rice Image with Library Label – Fade from reference model which is now familiar to the rice imagesHow will we fit with the academic enterprise in the next 2 – 5 years -
  • Develop Build ProposalReiterate Mike’s key points=================Upcoming presentations/eventsOLE Workshop (April 22) (Indianapolis, IN) – One day workshop at the IUPUI University Libraries in Indianapolis, IN sponsored by the Indiana University System Libraries, Purdue University Libraries, and the University of Notre Dame Hesburgh Libraries. The purpose of this workshop is to provide a forum for representatives of Indiana and Midwest regional academic and research libraries and related institutions to discuss and provide feedback on the current state of the OLE Project Planning Document. Register online atCNI - Coalition for Networked Information (April 6-7) (Minneapolis, MN) – Robert McDonald & Beth Warner, project briefing focusing on update since December and potential for build phaseEducause Enterprise (May 6-7) (Indianapolis, IN) – Robert McDonald, Michael Winkler, Beth Warner, presentation to primarily upper-level IT administrators and staff on OLE and potential build phaseNJLA - New Jersey Library Association (April 29-30) (Long Branch, NJ) – OLE reps will participate in a panel discussion.CANVAS GROUP FOR MORE COMPLETE LIST (see Events page)=========================Project Team Meeting – MayMay 28-29, Duke University – Finish polished draft of design document and project report==========================Draft design document – JuneWill be available for comment on OLE website============================Feedback Currently seeking feedback on new documents – Scope, Assumptions, revised Reference Model, revised/new process diagrams, etc Get complete list Emphasize that we really seek, value and encourage community feedback============================Final design document and project report – July 2009The OLE Project will provide a fully vetted planning document for a community sourced information management system to the Andrew W. Mellon Foundation by July 2009. ============================
  • impossible to estimate for OLE, but empirical data from other CS projects suggest adopters may realize 35% (lrg. Institution) – 90% (small institution) annual savingsEarly adopters will incur higher costsProven middleware can or will reduce the risks of exposure of sensitive data and improve auditability and compliance of software dataKuli Rice – can be used as a foundation for further enterprise integration, new opportunities for collaboration
  • OLE Project at ALA 2009 LITA Emerging Technologies Interest Group

    1. 1. July 11, 2009<br />ALA Annual Conference Chicago, IL<br />The Open Library Environment Project:<br />Building an ILS for Service Oriented Architecture Integration<br />Robert H. McDonald<br />Indiana University<br />Beth Forrest-Warner<br />University of Kansas<br />Carlen Ruschoff<br />University of Maryland<br />John Little<br />Duke University<br />ALA Annual Conference Chicago, IL<br />
    2. 2. Tweet our Session<br />Follow OLE on twitter @oleproject<br />Tags<br />#ala09<br />#ala2009<br />#lita<br />#etig<br />#oleproject<br />#totebag - snarky<br />ALA Annual Conference Chicago, IL<br />July 11, 2009<br />
    3. 3. Poll Anywhere<br />3 Ways to Poll <br />Text a code to 99503 = sms txt 99503 “code”<br />Tweet a code to @poll = @poll “code”<br />Go to http://poll4.com = enter “code”<br />ALA Annual Conference Chicago, IL<br />July 11, 2009<br />
    4. 4. Poll #1<br />In ten years, if it isn’t digital, it will be invisible.<br />Text a code to 99503 = sms txt 99503 “code”<br />Tweet a code to @poll = @poll “code”<br />Go to http://poll4.com = enter “code”<br />http://www.polleverywhere.com/multiple_choice_polls/LTMxODY4ODk2NQ<br />ALA Annual Conference Chicago, IL<br />July 11, 2009<br />
    5. 5. OLE and Mellon<br />OLE has been funded by the OLE partners and the Andrew W Mellon Foundation’s Research in Information Technology Program<br />Technology that benefits one or more of the constituencies traditionally served by the Foundation.<br />Technology that benefits multiple institutions.<br />Technology that can realistically be developed by the grantee within the proposed timeframe and budget.<br />Technology that provides a significant cost savings. <br />Compelling, demonstrable technology for which funding is required to create fully shareable versions, expanded features, or improved reliability.<br />Technology for which intellectual property rights are available.<br />Technology for which there is a credible support and self-sufficiency plan.<br />Technology whose value can be objectively assessed.<br />ALA Annual Conference Chicago, IL<br />July 11, 2009<br />
    6. 6. Overview<br />What is OLE and What Has OLE Been Doing for 12 Months?<br />Community Source Software and Governance!<br />Enterprise Level Management for Libraries!<br />OLE Future Directions!<br />Questions!<br />ALA Annual Conference Chicago, IL<br />July 11, 2009<br />
    7. 7. OLE Overview<br /><ul><li>What is the OLE Project?
    8. 8. Community source alternative to current ILS
    9. 9. International participation from libraries and consortia
    10. 10. 100+ institutions, 350+ individuals, 10+ regional workshops, multiple webcasts and presentations
    11. 11. Planning phase: September ‘08 – July ‘09</li></ul>July 11, 2009<br />ALA Annual Conference Chicago, IL<br />ALA Annual Conference Chicago, IL<br />
    12. 12. Why OLE Now?<br /> Our current library business technologies cost too much and deliver too little. We need to rethink our services and workflows, and to use technology that enables innovation rather than locking us into the status quo.<br />July 11, 2009<br />ALA Annual Conference Chicago, IL<br />
    13. 13. Our Institutions Change<br />July 11, 2009<br />ALA Annual Conference Chicago, IL<br />Enterprise financial systems<br />Enterprise identity management systems<br />Course management systems<br />Leverage local systems<br />Collaborative Systems<br />ILS – More & Less<br />More external integration and collaboration<br />Less internal, one-size-fits-all integration<br />
    14. 14. Our Users are Changing<br />Library technology systems have not kept pace with changing users and a changing information environment.<br />
    15. 15. Scenario<br />July 11, 2009<br />ALA Annual Conference Chicago, IL<br />Economist researcher<br />OLE Campus<br />Manages locations<br />Manages resource subscriptions<br />Integrated into <br />Course/Learning Mgt. System<br />Accounting<br />Identity (Student / HR)<br />Consortia<br />
    16. 16. Scenario<br />July 11, 2009<br />ALA Annual Conference Chicago, IL<br />Professor uses one of many access portals <br />OLE behind the scenes<br />Discovery enables access to full-text from various remote and nearby locales<br />Routing of physical materials enabled by OLE<br />On-demand purchases approved by patron<br />
    17. 17. Scenario<br />July 11, 2009<br />ALA Annual Conference Chicago, IL<br />Payment options<br />Delays noted (Recall, purchase, delivery)<br />
    18. 18. Scenario<br />July 11, 2009<br />ALA Annual Conference Chicago, IL<br />GPS-enabled<br />Original Search and mapping combined to highlight locale of like resources<br />OLE notes event-driven resource use for recommender services<br />Supports markup and social networking<br />Mashups<br />
    19. 19. OLE Principles<br /><ul><li>Flexibility
    20. 20. Community Ownership
    21. 21. Service Oriented Architecture
    22. 22. Enterprise-Level Integration
    23. 23. Efficiency
    24. 24. Sustainability</li></ul>Which of these do you see as being critical for the future of your library?<br />July 11, 2009<br />ALA Annual Conference Chicago, IL<br />
    25. 25. Poll #2<br />Which of these do you see as being critical to the future of your library?<br />http://www.polleverywhere.com/multiple_choice_polls/MzU5OTI3ODQz<br />ALA Annual Conference Chicago, IL<br />July 11, 2009<br />
    26. 26. Where we’ve been<br /><ul><li>Regional Design Workshops
    27. 27. Did you or your staff attend a workshop?
    28. 28. 350+ people from 100+ institutions!
    29. 29. Who attended?</li></ul>July 11, 2009<br />ALA Annual Conference Chicago, IL<br />
    30. 30. Where we’ve been<br /><ul><li>Project team meetings
    31. 31. Webinars
    32. 32. Community information sharing
    33. 33. Review information on the project website, oleproject.org</li></ul>July 11, 2009<br />ALA Annual Conference Chicago, IL<br />
    34. 34. Where We Are Today?<br /><ul><li>Scope Document
    35. 35. Vision
    36. 36. Principles
    37. 37. Functional Scope
    38. 38. Architecture
    39. 39. Governance</li></ul>July 11, 2009<br />ALA Annual Conference Chicago, IL<br />
    40. 40. Where We Are Today?<br /><ul><li>Project Assumptions
    41. 41. OLE will provide services that will help academic & research institutions accomplish their core mission by improving the library’s ability to deliver its content and services throughout the institution’s activities.
    42. 42. OLE provides a transformative opportunity to the institution through its support of a more collaborative approach to research, teaching and learning.
    43. 43. OLE will enable libraries to be more of a component with the enterprise infrastructure raising the relevance of libraries to the organization’s mission
    44. 44. Libraries are core to the research institution.
    45. 45. Adopting a model of community-source software development and a technology infrastructure based on service orientation is, in itself, a strategic innovation for libraries and universities.</li></ul>July 11, 2009<br />ALA Annual Conference Chicago, IL<br />
    46. 46. Where We Are Today?<br /><ul><li>Project assumptions (cont.)
    47. 47. Business workflows at peer libraries are more similar than they are different.
    48. 48. Libraries need to be able to leverage a dynamic information environment to support the research and educational mission of their institutions
    49. 49. Digital formats will dominate our business processes.
    50. 50. Collaborative and consortial activity is increasingly as important to libraries as work at local institutions.
    51. 51. Library business processes will increasingly involve interactions with external service providers and consumers.</li></ul>July 11, 2009<br />ALA Annual Conference Chicago, IL<br />
    52. 52. Where We Are Today?<br />ALA Annual Conference Chicago, IL<br />July 11, 2009<br /><ul><li>ILS Market
    53. 53. Community Source
    54. 54. Governance</li></li></ul><li>Why OLE Now?<br /><ul><li>Current ILS products are inadequate
    55. 55. Growing need for library systems to interact with other enterprise systems
    56. 56. Vendor consolidation constrains choices
    57. 57. Libraries need to control their own destinies</li></ul>July 11, 2009<br />ALA Annual Conference Chicago, IL<br />
    58. 58. Current Academic ILS Market<br />Ex Libris/Endeavor - 1465<br />Voyager - 862<br />Aleph 500 – 603<br />Innovative Interfaces - 1163<br />Millennium – 1163<br />SirsiDynix - 1076<br />Unicorn - 740<br />Horizon/Symphony – 336<br />ALA Annual Conference Chicago, IL<br />July 11, 2009<br />
    59. 59. ALA Annual Conference Chicago, IL<br />July 11, 2009<br />Legacy ILS Functionality<br />Public User <br />Interface:<br />Circulation<br />Acquisitions<br />Vendor Based ePurchasing<br />Functional<br />modules:<br />Cataloging<br />Serials<br />Vendor Based Metadata Enhancement<br />Data Stores:<br />Staff Interfaces:<br />
    60. 60. ALA Annual Conference Chicago, IL<br />July 11, 2009<br />Current ILS<br />Legacy ILS Functionality+eContentModule+Advanced DiscoveryInterface<br />Learning Mgmt./Campus Portal Feeds<br />Proxy/VPN for eContent Access<br />Circulation<br />Acquisitions<br />OpenURL<br />Linking<br />Federated<br />Search/<br />Advanced<br />Discovery<br />Electronic <br />Resource<br />Mgmt.<br />System<br />Cataloging<br />Serials<br />Unified Workflow Interface for Staff<br />
    61. 61. ALA Annual Conference Chicago, IL<br />July 11, 2009<br />SOA Models for ILS?<br />Composite<br />Applications<br />Reusable<br />Business <br />Services<br />Rule Oriented<br />Workflow Process<br />Data Stores:<br />
    62. 62. Community Source Projects<br />In traditional open source development the software code is made available for inspection and modification from the beginning of a project. In contrast to open source development, in so-called &apos;community source&apos; projects, such as Sakai, Kuali or the Symbian Foundation, a consortium of institutions or commercial companies sign an agreement, by which they decide to contribute a certain amount of financial or human resources, and get in exchange exclusivity in influencing the development of the project during an initial closed stage.<br />ALA Annual Conference Chicago, IL<br />July 11, 2009<br />From JISC OSS Watch<br />http://www.oss-watch.ac.uk/resources/communityvsopen.xml<br />
    63. 63. ALA Annual Conference Chicago, IL<br />July 11, 2009<br />Open Source Projects<br />From - http://blogs.the451group.com/opensource<br />
    64. 64. Community Source and OLE<br />Community Source Projects<br />Have sustainability over the course of the product development<br />Invest in the community of practice for long-term support and development<br />Fosters innovation and shared knowledge<br />Coordinates institutional goals rather than individual goals of the community of practice<br />Mitigates risk among peer institutions rather than in a single entity or vendor<br />ALA Annual Conference Chicago, IL<br />July 11, 2009<br />
    65. 65. ALA Annual Conference Chicago, IL<br />July 11, 2009<br />Governance Options<br /><ul><li>Institution-based
    66. 66. e.g. University of Michigan DLXS
    67. 67. e.g. LOCKSS
    68. 68. Community-based
    69. 69. More established: Sakai, Kuali
    70. 70. Emerging: DSpace, Fedora Commons
    71. 71. Try to join an existing organizational framework?
    72. 72. Where do libraries fit in an enterprise academic environment?</li></li></ul><li>ALA Annual Conference Chicago, IL<br />July 11, 2009<br />Build Plan Recommendations<br />Governance<br />LIBRARY<br />
    73. 73. ALA Annual Conference Chicago, IL<br />July 11, 2009<br />KUALI – Community Source<br />
    74. 74. Kuali Foundation<br />Kuali Financial<br />Business Management System<br />Kuali Student<br />Student Management System<br />Kuali Coeus<br />Research Administration System<br />Kuali Rice<br />Middleware for SOA service bus integration<br />ALA Annual Conference Chicago, IL<br />July 11, 2009<br />
    75. 75. More on Kuali Foundation<br />Founded as non-profit in 2004<br />Colorado State University and San Joaquin Delta College currently running Kuali Financial<br />Article The Next Open Source Movement – InsideHighered.com July 6, 2009<br />&quot;I think it&apos;s (kuali) going to be good for the industry,&quot; he said. &quot;It&apos;s going to force vendors to understand that institutions don&apos;t like vendor lock-in. You can&apos;t talk to an institution that enjoys being locked in and this will force all of us in the industry to really understand that.”<br />Jack Kramer – Sr. VP SunGard Higher Education<br />ALA Annual Conference Chicago, IL<br />July 11, 2009<br />
    76. 76. Further Readings on Kuali<br />Kuali Foundation<br />http://www.kuali.org<br />Business Officer Magazine – May 2009<br />http://www.nacubo.org/Business_Officer_Magazine/Magazine_Archives/May_2009/<br />InsideHigherEd.com – July 2009<br />http://www.insidehighered.com/news/2009/07/06/kuali<br />Open Source in Open Education – from Opening Up Education by Iiyoshi, Kumar, and Brown<br />http://books.google.com/books?id=gWrHFmAYX5EC&pg=PA1&dq=opeingin+up+education&lr=<br />ALA Annual Conference Chicago, IL<br />July 11, 2009<br />
    77. 77. Poll #4<br />Should library systems be better integrated with campus business & learning systems?<br />http://www.polleverywhere.com/multiple_choice_polls/LTE5NTEyMjk2OTE<br />ALA Annual Conference Chicago, IL<br />July 11, 2009<br />
    78. 78. ALA Annual Conference Chicago, IL<br />July 11, 2009<br />Enterprise Level Interactions<br /><ul><li>Library business systems need to be better integrated and interoperable with campus business and learning systems
    79. 79. Libraries must interact with and leverage other key campus systems, including financial, HR, student information, identity management, course management, and content repository systems</li></li></ul><li>ALA Annual Conference Chicago, IL<br />July 11, 2009<br />Transforming Teaching & Learning<br />39<br />
    80. 80. ALA Annual Conference Chicago, IL<br />July 11, 2009<br />Curating and Preserving Our Content<br />40<br />
    81. 81. ALA Annual Conference Chicago, IL<br />July 11, 2009<br />Leveraging Enterprise Systems & Content<br /><ul><li>Better interoperability and integration with:
    82. 82. Campus identity management systems
    83. 83. Leverage both on-campus and externally (consortiums)
    84. 84. Better ability to work with trusted peers (ex. Shibboleth)
    85. 85. Campus HR and Student systems
    86. 86. Why copy faculty and student information into the ILS?
    87. 87. Campus financial & purchasing systems
    88. 88. Take advantage of existing vendor information, invoice management, bill paying, etc.
    89. 89. Course management & content repository systems
    90. 90. Leverage library investments through better integration of content, both purchased and created on campus, into courses
    91. 91. Will require difficult discussions of policies and workflow, but pay-off is potentially more secure data (fewer copies), more efficient processes, and better use of campus investments </li></li></ul><li>ALA Annual Conference Chicago, IL<br />July 11, 2009<br />Creating Options<br />42<br />
    92. 92. OLE: New Methods, New Models<br />ALA Annual Conference Chicago, IL<br />July 11, 2009<br />Defining New Functionality<br />Redefining the Old<br />
    93. 93. Poll #5<br />Has your campus implemented any form of SOA?<br />http://www.polleverywhere.com/multiple_choice_polls/LTIxMDgxMzA1Mzc<br />ALA Annual Conference Chicago, IL<br />July 11, 2009<br />
    94. 94. What is SOA?<br />ALA Annual Conference Chicago, IL<br />July 11, 2009<br />Service Oriented Architecture<br />Service<br />System capabilities that provide access to functions and data are appropriately exposed to other components (applications, devices, networks, etc.)<br />Oriented<br />Uses “open” interoperability protocols<br />Architecture<br />In its purest form, it’s the connection of systems (simple or complex)<br />
    95. 95. SOA Video<br />ALA Annual Conference Chicago, IL<br />July 11, 2009<br />
    96. 96. Poll #3<br />In your opinion, is SOA and the interoperability that it offers a good idea?<br />http://www.polleverywhere.com/multiple_choice_polls/LTMwNTc1ODE4Mg<br />ALA Annual Conference Chicago, IL<br />July 11, 2009<br />
    97. 97. What is BPM?<br />ALA Annual Conference Chicago, IL<br />July 11, 2009<br /><ul><li>BPM = Business Process Modeling
    98. 98. Design approach
    99. 99. BPM process
    100. 100. What needs to be done
    101. 101. How to do it, in what order, and contingencies
    102. 102. Separate from the systems and services that do the work
    103. 103. Mid-level detail
    104. 104. Necessary before determining shared processes as part of SOA</li></li></ul><li>Example of a Modeling Process<br />ALA Annual Conference Chicago, IL<br />July 11, 2009<br /><ul><li>http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=S-Mbr31f2dg(no sound)</li></li></ul><li>Process Example<br />Select entity / obtain metadatahttp://oleproject.org/overview/ole-reference-model/select-entity/select-entity-obtain-metadata/<br />ALA Annual Conference Chicago, IL<br />July 11, 2009<br />Process Module: Select Entity<br />Process Title: Create Metadata<br />Definition: Process where metadata is created to supplement that which was obtained or when metadata is not available to be obtained.  The metadata created will support the activity that leads to the decision to select or reject an entity for inclusion in the environment.<br />Use Cases: Metadata being obtained may include descriptive (e.g. a review of the entity), holdings (e.g. what is available and being considered for acquisition), authority, financial, or other types. The metadata may be harvested from or deposited by another system<br />
    105. 105. Select Entity/Create Metadata<br />51<br />
    106. 106. Select Entity/Deliver Resource<br />52<br />
    107. 107. OLE Reference Model<br />ALA Annual Conference Chicago, IL<br />July 11, 2009<br />
    108. 108. Poll #6<br />In five years, most enterprise systems will be run in the cloud.<br />http://www.polleverywhere.com/multiple_choice_polls/LTYzNTcxMTIyMQ<br />ALA Annual Conference Chicago, IL<br />July 11, 2009<br />
    109. 109. OLE: Next Steps<br />Theory to Reality<br />ALA Annual Conference Chicago, IL<br />July 11, 2009<br />
    110. 110. Build Plan<br />ALA Annual Conference Chicago, IL<br />July 11, 2009<br /><ul><li>Use Existing Pieces
    111. 111. RICE Middleware
    112. 112. Kuali Nervous System (KNS)
    113. 113. Kuali System Bus (KSB)
    114. 114. Kuali Enterprise Workflow (KEW)
    115. 115. Kuali Enterprise Notification (KEN)
    116. 116. Kuali Identity Management (KIM)</li></li></ul><li>ALA Annual Conference Chicago, IL<br />July 11, 2009<br />Build Plan<br /><ul><li>Use Existing Systems
    117. 117. Existing Data Feeds
    118. 118. Open ERM Data
    119. 119. Shared Database Feeds
    120. 120. Existing Discovery Tools
    121. 121. WorldCat Local
    122. 122. LibraryFind
    123. 123. VuFind
    124. 124. Blacklight
    125. 125. XC (eXtensible Catalog Tools)</li></li></ul><li>ALA Annual Conference Chicago, IL<br />July 11, 2009<br />Build Plan<br /><ul><li>Outsource Coding
    126. 126. Model – Kuali Coeus
    127. 127. Single Project Manager (MIT)
    128. 128. Kuali Coeus outsources code to India-based software development firm
    129. 129. Build Plan for OLE will outsource code to Bulgarian-based software development firm</li></li></ul><li>ALA Annual Conference Chicago, IL<br />July 11, 2009<br />Build Plan<br /><ul><li>Mellon Foundation Matching Funding
    130. 130. Two Year Timeline
    131. 131. Year 1 Deliverables (will focus on one of these)</li></ul>A fully functioning core of services and framework – the OLE Core & Components<br />Management of Electronic Resources Services<br /> Leased eContent<br /> Owned eContent<br />Peer Resource Sharing Services<br /> Sharing content – peer to peer<br /> Sharing workflow – consortial<br />Acquisitions Services<br /> Will be the same as MER<br /> Will add EDI/Direct MER<br />CRM<br /> Unique service in this space<br /> Service to whole institution<br /> Track usage and needs of clients over time/looking for an LTR<br />
    132. 132. ALA Annual Conference Chicago, IL<br />July 11, 2009<br />Build Plan<br /><ul><li>Two Year Timeline
    133. 133. Year 2 Deliverables
    134. 134. Integrations
    135. 135. EDI/local ERP
    136. 136. discovery interface (broker for multi-discovery use)
    137. 137. data migration services
    138. 138. registries and utilities
    139. 139. Orchestrations
    140. 140. define workflows to match relevant, local resource set
    141. 141. determine optimum dataflows including effort distribution and sharing
    142. 142. Functional Scope
    143. 143. meet the business needs of a research or academic library
    144. 144. allow things to be turned off</li></li></ul><li>ALA Annual Conference Chicago, IL<br />July 11, 2009<br />Academic Enterprise (ERP)<br />Academic Enterprise<br />
    145. 145. ALA Annual Conference Chicago, IL<br />July 11, 2009<br />Library as Enterprise App<br />ERP<br />Library<br />PCH<br />HR<br />FIN<br />ER<br />Acq<br />P2P<br />KNS/KSB<br />KNS/KSB<br />Library as Academic Enterprise Partner<br />
    146. 146. OLE Reference Model<br />ALA Annual Conference Chicago, IL<br />July 11, 2009<br />
    147. 147. ALA Annual Conference Chicago, IL<br />July 11, 2009<br />Business Plan<br /><ul><li>Have a vetted business plan
    148. 148. Want to share with others
    149. 149. Will setup individual discussion for interested parties
    150. 150. Actively Seeking Build Partners
    151. 151. Looking for Consortia-led Partners</li></li></ul><li>OLE Build Phase<br />ALA Annual Conference Chicago, IL<br />July 11, 2009<br /><ul><li>Find Build Partners – Spring
    152. 152. Upcoming events/presentations
    153. 153. Project team meeting – May
    154. 154. Draft design document – June
    155. 155. Ongoing community input and feedback
    156. 156. Final design document & project report for Mellon Foundation and Public – July</li></li></ul><li>Risks of Participation<br />No CS project has yet failed, but failure … <br />Achieve consensus<br />Acquire sufficient resources<br />Deliver software of adequate functionality<br />Problems could arise with contract software<br />Adoption<br />Build sufficiently large vendor services community<br />ALA Annual Conference Chicago, IL<br />July 11, 2009<br />
    157. 157. Benefits of Participating<br />Cost Savings<br />Annual (35 – 90 percent for other CS projects)<br />Migration costs remain the same or diminish somewhat<br />Access to emerging technologies<br />Use monetary resources in a productive and directly influential fashion<br />Leverage ROI on campus for enterprise systems<br />ALA Annual Conference Chicago, IL<br />July 11, 2009<br />
    158. 158. Benefits of Participation<br />Secondary <br />Exposure<br />Staff enrichment<br />Productivity<br />Focus on culture of strategic innovations and innovative technologies<br />ALA Annual Conference Chicago, IL<br />July 11, 2009<br />
    159. 159. Cost of Participation<br />Cash Contribution<br />HR Contribution<br />Commitment to run some portion of the OLE software<br />ALA Annual Conference Chicago, IL<br />July 11, 2009<br />
    160. 160. Cash Contributions<br />$5.2 Million total partner contribution<br />7 partners - $185K / year<br />6 partners - $216K / year<br />5 partners - $260 / year<br />Consortia<br />Spread out the costs<br />Spread out the influence<br />ALA Annual Conference Chicago, IL<br />July 11, 2009<br />
    161. 161. Questions?<br />ALA Annual Conference Chicago, IL<br />July 11, 2009<br />
    162. 162. ALA Annual Conference Chicago, IL<br />July 11, 2009<br />Invest in Your Community?<br />Thank you!<br />Send comments or additional questions to<br />robert@indiana.edu - john.little@duke.edu - rushoff@umd.edu - bwarner@ku.edu<br />

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