Deut 040-slides

143 views

Published on

0 Comments
0 Likes
Statistics
Notes
  • Be the first to comment

  • Be the first to like this

No Downloads
Views
Total views
143
On SlideShare
0
From Embeds
0
Number of Embeds
1
Actions
Shares
0
Downloads
1
Comments
0
Likes
0
Embeds 0
No embeds

No notes for slide

Deut 040-slides

  1. 1. Israel s Government (stage #1)  Yahweh Law Moses 12 Tribes Elders
  2. 2. Israel s Government (stage #2)  Yahweh Law Moses Officers (“sarim ) Marching Units
  3. 3. Israel s Government (stage #3)  Yahweh Law Moses 70 Empowered Shoterim Officers (“sarim ) Marching Units
  4. 4. Israel s Government (stage #4)  Yahweh Law Supreme Court (priests & shoter) City 1 City 2 City 3 shoterim shoterim shoterim sarim sarim sarim
  5. 5. Ecclesiastical CivilSupplied the law of God and Proclaims the verdict andinterceded with God for proper enforces the punishmentjudgment ( Urim and (custodian of judicial force)Thummim Num 27:21?)
  6. 6. The Egyp)an belief [was] that the universe is changeless and that all apparent opposites must, therefore, hold each other in equilibrium.  Such a belief has definite consequences in the field of moral philosophy.  It puts a premium on whatever exists with a semblance of permanence.  It excludes ideals of progress, utopias of any kind, revolu)ons, and any other radical changes in exis)ng condi)ons. . . .In this way the belief in a sta)c universe enhances, for instance, the significance of established authority.  Henri Frankfort 
  7. 7. EGYPTIAN RELIGION heaven Horus    earth 
  8. 8. "[Pharaoh] was the fountainhead of all authority, all power, and all wealth.  The famous saying of Louis XIV, letat cest moi, was levity and presump)on when it was uLered, but could have been offered by Pharaoh as a statement of fact in which his subjects concurred.  It would have summed up adequately [Egyp)an] poli)cal philosophy.   Henri Frankfort 
  9. 9. The poli)cs of the an)‐Chris)an will. . inescapably be the poli)cs of guilt.  In the poli)cs of guilt, man is perpetually drained in his social energy and cultural ac)vity by his overriding sense of guilt and his masochis)c ac)vity.  He will progressively demand of the state a redemp)ve role.  What he cannot do personally, i.e., to save himself, he demands that the state do for him, so that the state, as man enlarged, becomes the human savior of man.  The poli)cs of guilt, therefore, is not directed as the Chris)an poli)cs of liberty, to the crea)on of the state. . . .The poli)cs of guilt cul)vates the slave mind in order to enslave men, and to have the people themselves demand an end to liberty.  Slaves, true slaves, want to be rescued from freedom; their greatest fear is liberty. . . .Even as a )mid and fearful child dreads dark, so does the slave mind fear liberty; it is full of the terrors of the unknown.  As a result, the slave mind clings to sta)st or state slavery, cradle‐to‐grave welfare care, as a fearful child clings to its mother.  The advantage of slavery is precisely this, security in the master or in the state.  

×