Behaviorism        By: Bianca Olmo
Behaviorism Menu What? Who? How? My ESE  Classroom Works Cited
Behaviorism                What It Is? Human psychology can only be studied through the examination of  behavioral events...
Three Types of Behaviorism1. Methodological Behaviorism     Psychology is the science of      behavior, not the mind.    ...
Who Are The Key     Figures? B.F. Skinner (1904-   Ivan Pavlov (1849-        1990)                 1936)Operant Conditioni...
B.F. SkinnerOperant Conditioning          Attempts to modify           behavior through           reinforcements.        ...
Ivan Pavlov      Classical Conditioning Automatic type of learning. A stimulus evokes a  response originally evoked  by ...
Pavlov’s DogClassical Conditioning http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=CpoLxEN54ho
How It Would Be Used In The        Classroom?     Role of Teachers     Role of Students
What Would The Teachers Do?                  Contracts      The relevant behavior should be      identified, and terms dis...
What Would The Students Do?                  Rewards        Students receive rewards for           appropriate behaviors. ...
Behaviorism In My ESE         ClassroomTo Avoid Student Frustration   ‐ Break down large tasks into small     segments   ‐...
Behaviorism In My ESE         ClassroomTo Keep Students on Task   ‐ Create predictable routines   ‐ Incorporate structure ...
Works Cited                      Resources  •   http://psychology.about.com/od/profilesofmajorthinkers/p/      bio_skinner...
Works Cited                                                    Images•   http://www.google.com/imgres?q=behaviorism&um=1&h...
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Behaviorism and Education Slide Show - Bianca Olmo
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Behaviorism

  1. 1. Behaviorism By: Bianca Olmo
  2. 2. Behaviorism Menu What? Who? How? My ESE Classroom Works Cited
  3. 3. Behaviorism What It Is? Human psychology can only be studied through the examination of behavioral events. Learning is a change in behavior.  Change induced by: o Punishment (positive and negative) • Decreases the likelihood the behavior will occur again • Adding or taking away a stimulus o Reinforcement (positive and Negative) • Increases the likelihood the behavior will occur again • Action -> Reaction -> Knowledge of Appropriate Future Behavior
  4. 4. Three Types of Behaviorism1. Methodological Behaviorism  Psychology is the science of behavior, not the mind.  Mental states aren’t useful for empirical study.2. Psychological Behaviorism  Sources for behavior are external, not internal.  Behavior can be explained without mental events.3. Analytical and Logical Behaviorism  Mental concepts should be translated into behavioral concepts.  Idea of mental state is the idea of behavioral disposition.
  5. 5. Who Are The Key Figures? B.F. Skinner (1904- Ivan Pavlov (1849- 1990) 1936)Operant Conditioning Classical Conditioning
  6. 6. B.F. SkinnerOperant Conditioning  Attempts to modify behavior through reinforcements.  Association between a particular behavior and a consequence.  Example • Parents rewarding a child with candy or a prize when they get good grades.
  7. 7. Ivan Pavlov Classical Conditioning Automatic type of learning. A stimulus evokes a response originally evoked by a different stimulus. Pavlov’s Dogs • Meat powder (Unconditioned Stimulus) • Dog’s salivation (Unconditioned Response) • Bell begins as a Neutral Stimulus but becomes the Conditioned Stimulus • Salivation after the bell (Conditioned Response)
  8. 8. Pavlov’s DogClassical Conditioning http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=CpoLxEN54ho
  9. 9. How It Would Be Used In The Classroom?  Role of Teachers  Role of Students
  10. 10. What Would The Teachers Do? Contracts The relevant behavior should be identified, and terms discussed. Consequences Must occur immediately after the behavior occurs. Reinforcement Positive/Negative Reinforcement and Punishment. Extinction Decreases the chances of a response by withdrawing a previously reinforced stimulus.
  11. 11. What Would The Students Do? Rewards Students receive rewards for appropriate behaviors. Confidence Positive feedback/responses boost students’ confidence levels. Behavior Changes Students change their inappropriate behavior to behavior that is acceptable.
  12. 12. Behaviorism In My ESE ClassroomTo Avoid Student Frustration ‐ Break down large tasks into small segments ‐ Demonstrate and explain each step in a new taskTo Help Overcome Difficulty Processing andMemory ‐ Include extra practice ‐ Review materials as often as necessary
  13. 13. Behaviorism In My ESE ClassroomTo Keep Students on Task ‐ Create predictable routines ‐ Incorporate structure into lessonsTo Make Sure Students are Absorbing theMaterial ‐ Gather feedback throughout the lesson
  14. 14. Works Cited Resources • http://psychology.about.com/od/profilesofmajorthinkers/p/ bio_skinner.htm • http://www.nobelprize.org/nobel_prizes/medicine/laureate s/1904/pavlov-bio.html • http://dictionary.reference.com/browse/behaviorism?s=t • http://www.learning-theories.com/classical-conditioning- pavlov.html • http://www.learning-theories.com/operant-conditioning- skinner.html • http://cie.asu.edu/volume8/number10/index.html#behavio r • http://projects.coe.uga.edu/epltt/index.php?title=Behaviori sm#Educational_Implications • https://www.msu.edu/~mckin115/Matrix/theories/Behavio rism.htm • http://www.iep.utm.edu/behavior/ • http://www.learning-theories.com/behaviorism.html • http://plato.stanford.edu/entries/behaviorism/
  15. 15. Works Cited Images• http://www.google.com/imgres?q=behaviorism&um=1&hl=en&biw=1517&bih=741 • http://www.google.com/imgres?q=behaviorism&um=1&hl=en&rlz=1C1 &tbm=isch&tbnid=4WHGivrAYvW- AFAB_enUS460US466&tbm=isch&tbnid=zSxT0xn9ear_qM:&imgrefurl=h 3M:&imgrefurl=http://academics.rmu.edu/~tomei/ed711psy/behave.htm&docid= ttp://projects.coe.uga.edu/epltt/index.php%3Ftitle%3DBehaviorism&do mqnsbJw0oOhLGM&imgurl=http://academics.rmu.edu/~tomei/ed711psy/Behaviori cid=sb1kV0ByI9G3SM&imgurl=http://projects.coe.uga.edu/epltt/images smcafe.gif&w=675&h=539&ei=N05-T86XOpSs8QTWzMScDg&zoom=1 /c/cf/Behaviorism_2.gif&w=388&h=118&ei=mmJ-• http://www.google.com/imgres?q=behaviorism&um=1&hl=en&tbm=isch&tbnid=4 T9qKM4Sc9gTdorzsDg&zoom=1&iact=hc&vpx=321&vpy=65&dur=46&ho mCT6Bnhrr3H1M:&imgrefurl=http://www3.hku.hk/cogsci/wiki/pmwiki.php%3Fn%3 vh=93&hovw=310&tx=142&ty=56&sig=115527933523406624476&page DMain.BriefHistoryOfCognitiveScience&docid=3xSybBoa5dOTsM&imgurl=http://w =3&tbnh=80&tbnw=263&start=43&ndsp=25&ved=1t:429,r:14,s:43,i:264 ww.hku.hk/cogsci/media/philo/emergence.jpg&w=150&h=198&ei=TFB-T- 6DHYnk9ASXmfi7Dg&zoom=1&iact=hc&vpx=197&vpy=463&dur=1527&hovh=157& &biw=1517&bih=741 hovw=120&tx=110&ty=134&sig=115527933523406624476&page=3&tbnh=157&tbn • http://www.google.com/imgres?q=stack+of+books&um=1&hl=en&sa=N w=120&start=43&ndsp=25&ved=1t:429,r:19,s:43,i:275&biw=1517&bih=741 &biw=1517&bih=701&tbm=isch&tbnid=Cj4FiFC11hOIEM:&imgrefurl=htt• http://www.google.com/search?um=1&hl=en&biw=1517&bih=741&tbm=isch&sa= p://jhard.googlecode.com/svn/trunk/presentaciones/segunda%2520def 1&q=Ivan+Pavlov&oq=Ivan+Pavlov&aq=f&aqi=g10&aql=&gs_l=img.3..0l10.5621l103 ensa/recursos/&docid=PvksV-Sn9- 13l0l10564l11l11l0l3l3l0l187l962l2j6l8l0.frgbld. QA7M&imgurl=http://jhard.googlecode.com/svn/trunk/presentaciones• http://www.google.com/imgres?q=B.F.+Skinner&um=1&hl=en&tbm=isch&tbnid=cb /segunda%252520defensa/recursos/Resource%252520Center%252520- 1UxbBMbNP45M:&imgrefurl=http://www.intropsych.com/ch05_conditioning/appli %252520Books.jpg.jpg&w=720&h=960&ei=7N2BT4LrEqHa0QHj5YSTCA& ed_analysis_of_antecedents.html&docid=p9o89zTHVM_6JM&imgurl=http://www.i ntropsych.com/ch05_conditioning/05skinner.jpg&w=635&h=900&ei=N1Z-T- zoom=1&iact=hc&vpx=1280&vpy=3&dur=7&hovh=258&hovw=193&tx= O3HoWY8gSG1tGODg&zoom=1&iact=hc&vpx=515&vpy=333&dur=19&hovh=266&h 133&ty=160&sig=115527933523406624476&page=3&tbnh=162&tbnw= ovw=187&tx=112&ty=135&sig=115527933523406624476&page=1&tbnh=158&tbn 122&start=59&ndsp=35&ved=1t:429,r:8,s:59,i:282 w=111&start=0&ndsp=23&ved=1t:429,r:10,s:0,i:143&biw=1517&bih=741 • http://www.google.com/imgres?q=student+desks&start=27&num=10&• http://www.pptbackgrounds.net/blackboard-800-0.html um=1&hl=en&biw=1517&bih=741&addh=140&tbm=isch&tbnid=1w7Fz• http://www.google.com/imgres?q=teacher&start=230&um=1&hl=en&rlz=1C1AFAB W3TwZ6_jM:&imgrefurl=http://www.hon.com/Products/Desks/SmartLi _enUS460US466&biw=1517&bih=741&addh=36&tbm=isch&tbnid=mSqNsY5njQUW nk-Student- -M:&imgrefurl=http://adriaberryportfolio.blogspot.com/&docid=_km- Desks.aspx&docid=lvBFMm16vdQCbM&imgurl=http://www.hon.com/g JHQsyiL_YM&imgurl=http://4.bp.blogspot.com/_RY127HsSwro/S6pJN9SIUOI/AAAA AAAAAo4/r8u9dkAAq3A/s1600/Apple%252Bbooks%252Bimage.jpg&w=380&h=294 etfile/ee1ffcc5-7b2a-4137-ab6c- &ei=Q_OBT- e35965d0bcee/.aspx%253Fmaxsidesize%253D266&w=215&h=266&ei=_ oP5dfRAZfe3PQH&zoom=1&iact=hc&vpx=1207&vpy=150&dur=658&hovh=196&ho O2BT_-oCYXW0QGB- vw=254&tx=117&ty=130&sig=115527933523406624476&page=10&tbnh=170&tbn cDvBw&zoom=1&iact=hc&vpx=966&vpy=410&dur=1166&hovh=211&ho w=252&ndsp=24&ved=1t:429,r:11,s:230,i:144 vw=171&tx=93&ty=114&sig=115527933523406624476&page=2&tbnh=• http://www.google.com/imgres?q=types+of+behaviorism&um=1&hl=en&rlz=1C1AF 166&tbnw=116&ndsp=26&ved=1t:429,r:10,s:27,i:26 AB_enUS460US466&biw=1517&bih=741&tbm=isch&tbnid=Fw2kX0BBEMTi1M:&img refurl=http://behaviorismpsychology.com/types-of-conditioning-in-behaviorism- psychology&docid=XMrjmDONgiMP_M&imgurl=http://behaviorismpsychology.com /wp-content/uploads/2011/05/Behaviorism-Psychology-2- 300x230.jpg&w=300&h=230&ei=ysWBT4PXIbKq0AH5v6TQBw&zoom=1&iact=hc&v px=1083&vpy=145&dur=1281&hovh=183&hovw=240&tx=126&ty=107&sig=115527 933523406624476&page=1&tbnh=125&tbnw=160&start=0&ndsp=31&ved=1t:429,r :6,s:0,i:79

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