Communicating Changes
And
Receiving Feedback
By
Anil Kumar
Sharad Kumar
Akanksha Singh
Anything that is or may be substituted for
another.
Sources of change
• The demand for change can arise from:
- the internal environment (e.g.
employees and departments)
- th...
Types of change
• Types of change include alterations to size,
structure, culture, leadership, tasks and
activities
• The ...
Lewin’s Force Field Analysis
• Change is the outcome of the impact of
driving forces upon restraining forces
• Driving forces are often economic in
nat...
The change process model
The change process model
Stage 1
• Unfreezing of current attitudes
and behaviour
• Organisational anticipation
The change process model
Stage 2
• Moving to a new level
• Organisational flux
• Information building
• Experimentation
The change process model
Stage 3
• Refreezing attitudes and behaviour
at the new level
• Highlight the positive outcomes o...
Communicating change
• In communicating change consider:
- the information which needs to be imparted
- the best media to ...
Cont…
• For communicating routine or minor change
use:
- circulars or newsletters
- announcements on
noticeboards
- letter...
Communicating change
• In communicating change aim to:
- involve organisation
members in planning and
implementing the cha...
Communicating change
- have a two-way dialogue with those
affected by the change
- counter informal communication,
such as...
Greiner’s model
• Greiner’s model can be used to highlight
the need:
– for structural change
– for development of key skil...
Greiner’s model
Five dimensions of organisational
development
• Age
• Size
• Stages of evolution
• Stages of revolution
• Industry growth ...
Phase 1 - Growth through
creativity
• Focus is product development and selling
• Crisis of leadership:
– informal manageme...
Phase 2 - Growth through
direction
• Crisis of leadership is resolved by:
–specialisation
–functional structure
–implement...
Phase 2 - Growth through
direction
• Crisis of autonomy
– over centralisation
– no opportunity to exercise initiative
Phase 3 - Growth through
delegation
• Crisis of autonomy is resolved by:
–decentralisation
–divisional structure
–top mana...
Phase 4 - Growth through co-
ordination
• Crisis of control is resolved by:
–formal planning
–more staff concerned with co...
Phase 4 - Growth through co-
ordination
• Crisis of red tape:
– lack of confidence in co-ordination between
employees and ...
Phase 5 - Growth through
collaboration
• Crisis of red tape is resolved by social
control and self discipline
• Crisis of ...
Feedback is:
information
about performance or behaviour
that leads to action to affirm or develop that
performance or beha...
Purpose of Feedback
How can we expect people to change and
develop if they don’t know what they need to
change?
Unless the...
Feedback Reality vs Perceptions
Most people really want to know how they are
doing. They want to know if other people like...
Feedback is NOT:
• an end in itself
• a solution to performance problems or issues
• praise or blame, approval or disappro...
Brown & Leigh’s Feedback Rules (1996)
• TIMELY
• SELECTIVE
• BALANCED
• SUGGESTIONS rather than PRESCRIPTIONS
• DESCRIPTIV...
The Impact of Feedback
The person receiving the feedback can react with:
• Anger – ‘I’ve had enough of this’
• Denial – th...
what type of feedback might you get?
• written/verbal individualised eg a particular assignment
• written/verbal general f...
Rules for Receiving Feedback
• Listen carefully to what is being said
• People should be receptive to feedback and see it ...
what to do with the feedback?
It is up to you
• Read or listen
• Understand; Clarification: examples and alternatives; Kee...
Communicating changes (1)
Communicating changes (1)
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Communicating changes (1)

  1. 1. Communicating Changes And Receiving Feedback By Anil Kumar Sharad Kumar Akanksha Singh
  2. 2. Anything that is or may be substituted for another.
  3. 3. Sources of change • The demand for change can arise from: - the internal environment (e.g. employees and departments) - the external environment (e.g. competition, markets and customers)
  4. 4. Types of change • Types of change include alterations to size, structure, culture, leadership, tasks and activities • The organisation can be reactive or proactive towards change
  5. 5. Lewin’s Force Field Analysis
  6. 6. • Change is the outcome of the impact of driving forces upon restraining forces • Driving forces are often economic in nature • Change invokes uncertainty in the existing workforce • Managers involved need to communicate strong justification for changes The process of change
  7. 7. The change process model
  8. 8. The change process model Stage 1 • Unfreezing of current attitudes and behaviour • Organisational anticipation
  9. 9. The change process model Stage 2 • Moving to a new level • Organisational flux • Information building • Experimentation
  10. 10. The change process model Stage 3 • Refreezing attitudes and behaviour at the new level • Highlight the positive outcomes of the changes
  11. 11. Communicating change • In communicating change consider: - the information which needs to be imparted - the best media to use • For communicating routine or minor change use: - circulars or newsletters - announcements on noticeboards - letters, memos and e-mail
  12. 12. Cont… • For communicating routine or minor change use: - circulars or newsletters - announcements on noticeboards - letters, memos and e-mail
  13. 13. Communicating change • In communicating change aim to: - involve organisation members in planning and implementing the change
  14. 14. Communicating change - have a two-way dialogue with those affected by the change - counter informal communication, such as rumours and gossip
  15. 15. Greiner’s model • Greiner’s model can be used to highlight the need: – for structural change – for development of key skills – to manage transfer from one phase to the next
  16. 16. Greiner’s model
  17. 17. Five dimensions of organisational development • Age • Size • Stages of evolution • Stages of revolution • Industry growth rate
  18. 18. Phase 1 - Growth through creativity • Focus is product development and selling • Crisis of leadership: – informal management style becomes inadequate – more expertise is needed
  19. 19. Phase 2 - Growth through direction • Crisis of leadership is resolved by: –specialisation –functional structure –implementing control systems –formal communication –Decision Making expands up the hierarchy
  20. 20. Phase 2 - Growth through direction • Crisis of autonomy – over centralisation – no opportunity to exercise initiative
  21. 21. Phase 3 - Growth through delegation • Crisis of autonomy is resolved by: –decentralisation –divisional structure –top management deal with strategic issues and middle manager competitive issues • Crisis of control: – top management feel a loss of control over the divisions
  22. 22. Phase 4 - Growth through co- ordination • Crisis of control is resolved by: –formal planning –more staff concerned with control throughout the organisation –encourage managers to take a corporate perspective
  23. 23. Phase 4 - Growth through co- ordination • Crisis of red tape: – lack of confidence in co-ordination between employees and HQ – proliferation of systems – innovation is stifled
  24. 24. Phase 5 - Growth through collaboration • Crisis of red tape is resolved by social control and self discipline • Crisis of collaboration - employees exhausted by teamwork and the need for innovation
  25. 25. Feedback is: information about performance or behaviour that leads to action to affirm or develop that performance or behaviour.
  26. 26. Purpose of Feedback How can we expect people to change and develop if they don’t know what they need to change? Unless they get feedback, how do they know what they do well so they can continue doing it?
  27. 27. Feedback Reality vs Perceptions Most people really want to know how they are doing. They want to know if other people like what they’re doing. They also want to know if something could be done more effectively or if boundaries are being overstepped.
  28. 28. Feedback is NOT: • an end in itself • a solution to performance problems or issues • praise or blame, approval or disapproval. Evaluation means to place value on a performance or piece of work. But feedback is value neutral. It merely describes what you did or did not accomplish, given a standard or intent. • Derived from tests, exercises or simulations. The activity being assessed is your normal work. You cannot get closer to real life than real life itself.
  29. 29. Brown & Leigh’s Feedback Rules (1996) • TIMELY • SELECTIVE • BALANCED • SUGGESTIONS rather than PRESCRIPTIONS • DESCRIPTIVE • SPECIFIC or focussed Avoid personal comments Avoid Mixed Messages Avoid diffusion • DIRECTED towards behaviour that can be changed
  30. 30. The Impact of Feedback The person receiving the feedback can react with: • Anger – ‘I’ve had enough of this’ • Denial – this reaction often accompanies the initial shock of feedback ‘I cant see any problem with that’ • Blame – ‘It’s not my fault. What can you expect when the patient won’t listen? • Rationalisation – finding excuses to try and justify their behaviour ‘I’ve had a particularly bad week’ ‘Doesn’t everyone do this?’ • Acceptance • Renewed Action
  31. 31. what type of feedback might you get? • written/verbal individualised eg a particular assignment • written/verbal general feedback to your class eg on most common errors/successes on an exam paper • checklists/proforma eg headings of assessment criteria, with comments below • assessment criteria grid, showing where you are placed against each criteria • model answers • computerised eg multiple-choice questions • "Off the cuff" comments from others eg "You're really good at…"
  32. 32. Rules for Receiving Feedback • Listen carefully to what is being said • People should be receptive to feedback and see it as helpful. • Don’t reject it! Accept positive feedback…don’t reject it! Accept negative feedback...don’t reject it! Avoid arguing or being defensive. • Ask questions to clarify fully and seek examples is useful. • Acknowledge the giver of feedback and show his or her appreciation. The feedback may not have been easy to give. • Involve mutual good will receiver should feel that the giver isn’t their enemy giver needs to want to help receiver develop
  33. 33. what to do with the feedback? It is up to you • Read or listen • Understand; Clarification: examples and alternatives; Keep notes • Give it time to sink in and get into perspective • Try to keep feedback sheets/information together • Address areas for improvement. Identify, Action Plan • Try not to feel devastated by small criticisms and try not to be defensive and make excuses

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