LH 22 | Lawyering in the Great Society

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LH 22 | Lawyering in the Great Society

  1. 1. Professor Bernard Hibbitts<br />University of Pittsburgh School of Law | Fall 2010<br />Lawyering: A History<br />
  2. 2. Lawyering in the Great Society, 1960-1980<br />
  3. 3. America in the Kennedy years<br />
  4. 4. Economic boom<br />
  5. 5. Civil rights and domestic reforms<br />
  6. 6. Military assistance abroad<br />
  7. 7. Setbacks<br />
  8. 8. Assassination<br />
  9. 9. Vietnam becomes a quagmire<br />
  10. 10. Anti-war protests<br />
  11. 11. Johnson and the Great Society<br />
  12. 12. Race riots<br />
  13. 13. The rise and fall of Richard Nixon<br />
  14. 14. Reversals under Carter<br />
  15. 15. An expanding bar<br />
  16. 16. 1960 285,933<br />1963 296,069<br />1967 316,856<br />1970 355,242<br />1972 358,920<br />1977 462,000<br />1980 542,205<br />The legal profession doubles in size<br />
  17. 17. 1960 7,000<br />1970 13,000<br />1980 70,000<br />Women in practice<br />
  18. 18. A beachhead for black Americans<br />
  19. 19. The boom in legal education<br />
  20. 20. More female law students<br />
  21. 21. Goodbye to Portia<br />
  22. 22. Men take over<br />
  23. 23. New England School of Law, 1969<br />
  24. 24. 1969-70 2,128<br />1971-72 3,744<br />1972-73 4,423<br />1973-74 4,817<br />1974-75 4,995<br />1975-76 5,127<br />1976-77 5,503<br />1977-78 5,305<br />1978-79 5,350<br />1979-80 5,257<br />1980-81 5,506<br />More black law students<br />
  25. 25. Black law schools<br />
  26. 26. More emphasis on the LSAT<br />
  27. 27. Inside the law schools<br />
  28. 28. The world of practice<br />
  29. 29. Stability in the 60s<br />
  30. 30. Tumult in the 70s<br />
  31. 31. Expansion and stress<br />
  32. 32. The billable hour<br />
  33. 33. Reginald Heber Smith<br />
  34. 34. The end of minimum fee schedules<br />
  35. 35. Electronic legal research<br />
  36. 36. John Horty<br />
  37. 37. LEXIS<br />
  38. 38. Discrimination in the profession<br />
  39. 39. Jewish firms grow quickly<br />
  40. 40. Other types of practice<br />
  41. 41. Government lawyering<br />
  42. 42. Cause lawyering<br />
  43. 43. Legal aid and public defense<br />
  44. 44. Clara Foltz<br />
  45. 45. Gideon v. Wainwright, 1963<br />
  46. 46. A federal legal aid program<br />
  47. 47. California Rural Legal Assistance<br />
  48. 48. Ronald Reagan<br />
  49. 49. Spiro Agnew<br />
  50. 50. “Is this simple advocacy? Or is it social engineering on a grand scale and without accountability to anyone?...As it operates now, it is a public project but without public direction or public accountability… [B]asic attitudes within this [the legal services] program should be changed. So long as individual attorneys conceive their role to be that of social engineers, they will continue to exacerbate community tensions and undermine the very purpose they were hired to accomplish.”<br />
  51. 51. Legal Services Corporation, 1974<br />
  52. 52. LSC Chair, 1979-1980<br />
  53. 53. Lawyer advertising<br />
  54. 54. The Bates/O’Steen ad<br />
  55. 55. Bates v. State Bar of Arizona, 1977<br />
  56. 56. Ethical challenges<br />
  57. 57. Code of Professional Responsibility, 1969<br />
  58. 58. Watergate<br />
  59. 59. The lawyers<br />
  60. 60. Model Rules of Professional Conduct<br />
  61. 61. Lawyering in the Great Society, 1960-1980<br />
  62. 62. Professor Bernard Hibbitts<br />University of Pittsburgh School of Law | Fall 2010<br />Lawyering: A History<br />

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