LH 19 | Progressive Lawyering II

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LH 19 | Progressive Lawyering II

  1. 1. Professor Bernard Hibbitts<br />University of Pittsburgh School of Law | Fall 2010<br />Lawyering: A History<br />
  2. 2. Lawyering in the Progressive Era<br />
  3. 3. Part II: Making Progressive Lawyers<br />
  4. 4. Apprenticeship collapses<br />
  5. 5. A forlorn hope?<br />
  6. 6. Technology<br />
  7. 7. Technology<br />
  8. 8. Practice<br />
  9. 9. Law<br />
  10. 10. Law schools boom<br />
  11. 11. 1890 61 law schools<br />1900 102<br />1910 124<br />1921 142<br />1928 173<br />US law schools<br />
  12. 12. 1890 4,518 students enrolled<br />1900 12,516<br />1910 19,567<br />1921 27,000<br />US law school enrollments<br />
  13. 13. Setting standards<br />
  14. 14. The case method spreads<br />
  15. 15. Chicago in question<br />
  16. 16. Joseph Beale<br />
  17. 17. Ernst Freund<br />
  18. 18. Freund’s curriculum<br />
  19. 19. Beale’s curriculum<br />
  20. 20. Change<br />
  21. 21. Roscoe Pound<br />
  22. 22. Legal education: problems<br />
  23. 23. The Redlich Report, 1914<br />
  24. 24. The Reed Report, 1921<br />
  25. 25. Legal education: solutions?<br />
  26. 26. Pennsylvania preceptorships<br />
  27. 27. Law school clinics<br />
  28. 28. Functionalism at Columbia<br />
  29. 29. Night law schools<br />
  30. 30. Women and minorities at BU<br />
  31. 31. Women and minorities at BU<br />
  32. 32. Women and minorities at BU<br />
  33. 33. The YMCA law schools<br />
  34. 34. Robert Ochiltree<br />
  35. 35. Northeastern University Law School<br />Golden Gate University Law School<br />Capital University Law School<br />Salmon P. Chase School of Law<br />University of Toledo School of Law<br />Western New England School of Law<br />Detroit College of Law<br />Southern Methodist University School of Law<br />South Texas College of Law<br />YMCAs today<br />
  36. 36. The Suffolk story<br />
  37. 37. Gleason Archer<br />
  38. 38. Archer’s Evening Law School<br />
  39. 39. Suffolk Law School students, 1911<br />
  40. 40. Suffolk Law School students, 1920<br />
  41. 41. Archer the author<br />
  42. 42. Archer the publicist<br />
  43. 43. Archer the radio star<br />
  44. 44. Archer the showman<br />
  45. 45. Bar exam wars<br />
  46. 46. Suffolk Evening Law School 99%<br /> Harvard Law School 62%<br /> Northeastern University Law School (YMCA) 41%<br />Massachusetts bar pass rates, 1925<br />
  47. 47. The world’s biggest law school<br />
  48. 48. Law schools for women<br />
  49. 49. 1909 205 enrolled<br />1915 609<br />1920 1,171<br />More women in law school<br />
  50. 50. Washington College of Law<br />
  51. 51. First graduates, 1898<br />
  52. 52. Portia Law School<br />
  53. 53. Arthur MacLean<br />
  54. 54. Portia?<br />
  55. 55. Room to grow<br />
  56. 56. Instruction<br />
  57. 57. Promoting Portia<br />
  58. 58. Promoting Portia<br />
  59. 59. More women than any other law school<br />
  60. 60. More women than any other law school<br />
  61. 61. Cambridge Law School for Women<br />
  62. 62. Concerns<br />
  63. 63. Higher ABA and AALS standards<br />
  64. 64. The night schools fight back<br />
  65. 65. The night schools fight back<br />
  66. 66. Exporting American legal education<br />
  67. 67. The Philippines <br />
  68. 68. George Malcolm<br />
  69. 69. University of the Philippines College of Law, 1911<br />
  70. 70. Charles Lobingier<br />
  71. 71.
  72. 72. Puerto Rico<br />
  73. 73. University of Puerto RicoCollege of Law, 1913<br />
  74. 74. China<br />
  75. 75. Pei-Yang University<br />
  76. 76. Pros…<br />
  77. 77. …and cons<br />
  78. 78. The Comparative Law School, 1915<br />
  79. 79. Shanghai<br />
  80. 80.
  81. 81. Before the great [Communist] revolution of 1927, the entire curriculum at the Soochow Law School was the English and American imperialist curriculum, without one course on Chinese law. All instructors used English, and the only study materials were Anglo-American cases. Other than formal courses, the Dean also invited “American scholars” to lecture at the school, as a way to deeply implant imperialist political thought.<br />A (later) Chinese perspective<br />
  82. 82. Meanwhile, in Pittsburgh…<br />
  83. 83. Duquesne University Law School, 1911<br />
  84. 84. Western University of PennsylvaniaPittsburgh Law School<br />
  85. 85. University of Pittsburgh School of Law<br />
  86. 86. Judson Crane<br />
  87. 87. Robert Vann<br />
  88. 88. Sara Soffel<br />
  89. 89. …and a new home!<br />
  90. 90. Lawyering in the Progressive Era<br />
  91. 91. Professor Bernard Hibbitts<br />University of Pittsburgh School of Law | Fall 2010<br />Lawyering: A History<br />

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