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Lawyering in Ancient Rome<br />
Announcements redux<br />
Make-up 107 Wed. Sept 8 12-1:15<br />Announcements redux<br />
Part II: Lawyering in the Empire<br />
Jurists and the state<br />
Advocacy and empire<br />
Fees<br />
Fees<br />Lexcincia, 204 BC<br />Reintroduced by Augustus, 17 BC<br />New legislation by Claudius, 47 AD<br />
“New men” and the decline of oratory<br />
Lawyering in place<br />
The Basilica Julia<br />
The Basilica reborn<br />
Inside the Basilica Julia<br />
The steps<br />
The laudiceni<br />
The Forum Augustus<br />
Inside the Forum Augustus<br />
The Forum Trajanus<br />
Academic lawyers<br />
Gaius<br />
A palimpsest<br />
Roman law schools<br />
Berytusnutrixlegum<br />
Berytus today<br />
Advocates east and west<br />
The codifiers<br />
Too much law<br />
Codex Gregorianus, 291 AD<br />Codex Hermogenianus, 294 AD<br />Codex Theodosianus, 312 AD<br />Early codes<br />
Justinian<br />
The last jurist?<br />
The Corpus JurisCivilis<br />
The Institutes<br />The Digest<br />The Code <br />The Novels (added later)<br />The Corpus JurisCivilis<br />
In the name of Our Lord, Jesus Christ. <br />The Emperor Caesar Flavius Justinian, conqueror of the Alamanni, the Goths, t...
The imperial majesty should be armed with laws as well as glorified with arms, that there may be good government in times ...
The Digest<br />
Tribonian’s legacy<br />
Berytus destroyed<br />
Ave atque vale<br />
How – and why – did the Roman emperors co-opt the jurists?<br />How did the conditions of empire change the practice of Ro...
Next week… Medieval canon lawyers!<br />
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LH 5 | Lawyering in Ancient Rome | Part II - Lawyering in the Empire

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LH 5 | Lawyering in Ancient Rome | Part II - Lawyering in the Empire

  1. 1. Lawyering in Ancient Rome<br />
  2. 2. Announcements redux<br />
  3. 3. Make-up 107 Wed. Sept 8 12-1:15<br />Announcements redux<br />
  4. 4. Part II: Lawyering in the Empire<br />
  5. 5. Jurists and the state<br />
  6. 6. Advocacy and empire<br />
  7. 7. Fees<br />
  8. 8. Fees<br />Lexcincia, 204 BC<br />Reintroduced by Augustus, 17 BC<br />New legislation by Claudius, 47 AD<br />
  9. 9. “New men” and the decline of oratory<br />
  10. 10. Lawyering in place<br />
  11. 11. The Basilica Julia<br />
  12. 12. The Basilica reborn<br />
  13. 13. Inside the Basilica Julia<br />
  14. 14. The steps<br />
  15. 15. The laudiceni<br />
  16. 16.
  17. 17. The Forum Augustus<br />
  18. 18. Inside the Forum Augustus<br />
  19. 19. The Forum Trajanus<br />
  20. 20. Academic lawyers<br />
  21. 21. Gaius<br />
  22. 22. A palimpsest<br />
  23. 23. Roman law schools<br />
  24. 24. Berytusnutrixlegum<br />
  25. 25. Berytus today<br />
  26. 26. Advocates east and west<br />
  27. 27. The codifiers<br />
  28. 28. Too much law<br />
  29. 29. Codex Gregorianus, 291 AD<br />Codex Hermogenianus, 294 AD<br />Codex Theodosianus, 312 AD<br />Early codes<br />
  30. 30. Justinian<br />
  31. 31. The last jurist?<br />
  32. 32. The Corpus JurisCivilis<br />
  33. 33. The Institutes<br />The Digest<br />The Code <br />The Novels (added later)<br />The Corpus JurisCivilis<br />
  34. 34. In the name of Our Lord, Jesus Christ. <br />The Emperor Caesar Flavius Justinian, conqueror of the Alamanni, the Goths, the Franks, the Germans, the Antes, the Alani, the Vandals, the Africans, pious, prosperous, renowned, victorious, and triumphant, ever august, <br />To the youth desirous of studying the law: <br />The Institutes<br />
  35. 35. The imperial majesty should be armed with laws as well as glorified with arms, that there may be good government in times both of war and of peace, and the ruler of Rome may not only be victorious over his enemies, but may show himself as scrupulously regardful of justice as triumphant over his conquered foes…<br />Receive then these laws with your best powers and with the eagerness of study, and show yourselves so learned as to be encouraged to hope that when you have compassed the whole field of law you may have ability to govern such portion of the state as may be entrusted to you. <br />
  36. 36. The Digest<br />
  37. 37. Tribonian’s legacy<br />
  38. 38. Berytus destroyed<br />
  39. 39. Ave atque vale<br />
  40. 40.
  41. 41. How – and why – did the Roman emperors co-opt the jurists?<br />How did the conditions of empire change the practice of Roman advocacy?<br />Why did Roman law schools arise?<br />Did Tribonian save Roman law through codification, or did he destroy it?<br />Review questions<br />
  42. 42. Next week… Medieval canon lawyers!<br />
  43. 43. Lawyering in Ancient Rome<br />
  44. 44. Professor Bernard Hibbitts<br />University of Pittsburgh School of Law | Fall 2010<br />Lawyering: A History<br />

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