Successfully reported this slideshow.
We use your LinkedIn profile and activity data to personalize ads and to show you more relevant ads. You can change your ad preferences anytime.

Rhetoric In Popular Culture

2,930 views

Published on

Presentation about rhetoric and popular culture for an undergraduate classroom.

  • Be the first to comment

  • Be the first to like this

Rhetoric In Popular Culture

  1. 1. Rhetoric in Popular Culture Barry Brummett
  2. 2. Communication Models (212) <ul><li>Eurocentric Models </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Sender to receiver </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Senders intention of meaning important </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Shared process </li></ul></ul><ul><li>Afrocentric Models (Assante) </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Caller initiates act to chorus </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Chorus helps create meaning of message </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Unity between caller and listener(s) </li></ul></ul>
  3. 3. Definition of Rhetoric <ul><li>“the ways in which signs influence people” (4) </li></ul><ul><li>Rhetorical power-”the ability to control . . . meanings” (4) </li></ul><ul><li>“An ideology or consciousness is an interrelated system of meanings …” (25). </li></ul>
  4. 4. Tradition vs. Mass Media <ul><li>4 Features/Text </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Verbal </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Words dominate </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Expositional </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Linear argument </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Discrete </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Special time and place </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Hierarchical </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>POWER to/of speaker </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><li>Mediated Texts </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Nonverbal </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Word and image </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Metonymic and narrative </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Reduction to key </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>story </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Diffuse texts </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Related together </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Democratic </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Multiple interpretations </li></ul></ul></ul>
  5. 5. The Theory of Signs <ul><li>According to C.S. Peirce, signs cause audiences to think of something other than the sign itself (Brummett 6) </li></ul><ul><li>Three big words </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Signifier—the placeholder (word; image) </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Signifies—the referent </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Signification—the process of meaning </li></ul></ul>
  6. 6. 3 Kinds of Signs <ul><li>Index </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Cause and association </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Penis male; vagina female </li></ul></ul><ul><li>Iconic </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Resemblance </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Dresses=female; tuxedo=male </li></ul></ul><ul><li>Symbolic </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Agreement </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Feminine pronoun=she </li></ul></ul>

×