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Celebrate Living History mini- magazine  Slide 1 Celebrate Living History mini- magazine  Slide 2 Celebrate Living History mini- magazine  Slide 3 Celebrate Living History mini- magazine  Slide 4 Celebrate Living History mini- magazine  Slide 5 Celebrate Living History mini- magazine  Slide 6 Celebrate Living History mini- magazine  Slide 7 Celebrate Living History mini- magazine  Slide 8 Celebrate Living History mini- magazine  Slide 9 Celebrate Living History mini- magazine  Slide 10 Celebrate Living History mini- magazine  Slide 11 Celebrate Living History mini- magazine  Slide 12
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Celebrate Living History mini- magazine

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June 2020 edition

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Celebrate Living History mini- magazine

  1. 1. CELEBRATE LIVING HISTORY WWW.CELEBRATELIVINGHISTORY.COM.AU Howdy Folks! It has been a long time since we have published a mini magazine and a lot has happened since 2019! I hope you all have been well during this Covid crisis and taking time out to focus on the little things that matter. I know this time has been one of great reflection for me and I try to focus on the positives rather than the negatives. Thats all you can really do. I've been lucky to still run the Celebrate Living History internship program as this time. Did you know the program has been running for 9 years now? Time sure does fly. I've had the pleasure of welcoming Deng Feng from Griffith University in Brisbane who helped in promoting our new book  Words from Bev Founder of Celebrate Living History CONTENTS ENTREPRENEURS GENERATIONS APART MEET DENG FENG CHOCOLATE CHIP COOKIES MEET HANS SCHWEDLER FIGHTING SPRIT MEET DAVID PAGOTTO SPONSORS AMD SUPPORTERS
  2. 2. P H O T O B Y M A R T I N R . S M I T H Entrepreneurs: Generations Apart. It was a huge goal to have this book come out into the world. And there were times where I thought having a tangible book will never happen. But I kept plugging along and the book became a reality. And I am so proud that this book can one day be shared among generations of future entrepreneurs. Through publishing Entrepreneurs: Generations Apart I was inspired to create another book on all the casual jobs I have done over the past 10 years. Through these roles I met one of my good friends Vince Vihtelic at the Melbourne Cricket Club he always made me laugh and made my day just a little bit brighter. This issue is dedicated to Vince who sadly passed away in May at the age of 56. Keep safe and dream big! Till next time! Bev Wilkinson WWW.CELEBRATELIVINGHISTORY.COM.AU 'Launch of Entrepreneurs Generations Apart Russell, Bev, Su jo and Kate Spagetti Tree Melbourne
  3. 3. P H O T O B Y M A R T I N R . S M I T H Meet Deng Feng What attracts you about being an intern at Celebrate Living History?  I am not a journalism student but Bev’s program inspired me and makes me remember who we are today. Without senior’s experience and what they have done for us. We cannot make this world better. Being an intern at celebrate living history you can read a lot of different stories from our seniors from locally or internationally. And of course, the flexible hours that we can work on the projects any time anywhere.Who is an older person that you admire and why? That person is my step-grandpa, I have never seen my grandpa because he passed away since my father was 8. My step-grandpa treated the family very well and he never give up on me and always encourage me to do whatever I dream about. He taught me to be a better person and gave me a lot of life experience that I would never learnt from the school.If you could jump into a time machine what era would you visit and why?I have never thought about this questions before but If I can travel back in time I would definitely go back to when I was 6 which the time I had chances and opportunities to be an actor and learn piano. But I was way too shy and I cried on the stage. If I ever can go back I think I would choose different path of my life and do something different and see what will happen after 10 years. PWWW.CELEBRATELIVINGHISTORY.COM.AU
  4. 4. P H O T O B Y M A R T I N R . S M I T H Chocolate Chip Cookies By Caitlin McMullen Dotti is a 92 year-old woman who loves to cook sweet treats. For the past 2 years she has been coming into my workplace every Saturday, making me try some of her inventions or her traditional recipes, which have been passed on for generations. Some of these recipes shared have been within her family for 70 years. She told me that she hasn’t shared her recipes with anyone before, so I’m privileged not just to eat them, but to find out how she does it. Dotti doesn’t go by exact measurements or steps; it comes naturally to her, something that I aspire to at her age. Going strong for a 92 year-old, she loves having friends over, insists on making me a cake every time I go over (even though she is cooking something else for me), and has two chickens which she hasn’t named. ' You will need:Whole-wheat flour 2 teaspoons of baking powder Teaspoon of baking soda Salt Butter Brown Sugar Sugar 2 Eggs 2 teaspoons of vanilla extract 100g of chocolate 1. Preheat the oven to 170 degrees. 2. Use baking paper to put on your trays. “This is an important step. If you don’t do this, your cookies will stick to the tray; it’s not fun to clean at all.” 3. Add three cups of flour, the baking powder, baking soda and a tiny bit of salt into a mixing bowl. 4. Put the butter sugar into your beater and mix it. 5. Add the eggs and the vanilla extract into the beater. “I’m using the hens’ eggs today, so this recipe should taste very organic” 6. Add the flour mixture into the beater, then the chocolate, broken into bits. “If you want it to be extra chocolatey, add an extra bit of chocolate. I like to do this sometimes.” WWW.CELEBRATELIVINGHISTORY.COM.AU
  5. 5. P H O T O B Y M A R T I N R . S M I T H Chocolate Chip Cookies By Caitlin McMullen 7. Separate your cookies and place them into your baking trays. “I find it easier to use your hands to roll the cookie dough into balls on the trays” 8. Now, put them in the oven for about 15 minutes. “I can usually tell when they are ready from the scent. But just keep an eye on them, because nobody wants a burnt cookie” “Let them cool down for a bit, as the chocolate bits can get quite hot when they are melted. Enjoy them as a snack, like I do, or they are a good gift. I make them for people’s birthdays; homemade things are more appreciated these days, I find” Meet Hans Schwedler who is founder of  Laughing Life which runs fun sessions to bring the community together through humour. What advice would you give to the younger generation? Find your passion and purpose for your life and go for it. Join the University of Life as there are no HECS fees. WWW.CELEBRATELIVINGHISTORY.COM.AU
  6. 6. P H O T O B Y M A R T I N R . S M I T H Fighting Spirit Some would say from a young age Val French was destined for a life full of excitement and fighting spirit. As a little girl, Val was raised in three different mental intuitions, inspired by her parents desire to change the world in their own way.Val’s father was a psychiatrist and her mother was in charge of social activities. Reflecting on her time at Callan Park Mental Hospital, Val says her desire to change the world started at the age of seven the exact moment her father showed her a room packed with 50 psychiatric patients.“It wasn’t like the hospitals I had been in before they were country hospitals this was an institution,” she says“There was a toilet in the middle of the room, it was completely and utterly open, the beds were so together,” “There were bugs, it was awful he said to me, I wanted you to know what sort of place we have come to, you need to know what mankind can do to mankind. This is part of the worst of it, we need to change all this. “ As a child Val would be like her father’s shadow following him everywhere.“Dad’s idea was to make me a part of everything that was going on around the hospital. He introduced all sorts of things like he did in the other hospitals, sport tennis and all that sort of stuff,” she says“I was very much part of it, I always went with him all over the place except when I was at school and gradually as I got older I had the run of the hospital, “It was great, it was a tremendous experience and from it all it brought up that your job is to make changes that is my life, anything that I see I don’t think is not fair or right I always fought it, WWW.CELEBRATELIVINGHISTORY.COM.AU ' '
  7. 7. P H O T O B Y M A R T I N R . S M I T H “I think why not that is what I was brought up to believe that you don’t say isn’t this terrible you do something about it and change it,“So that’s virtually the story of my life, change after change I have been part of. It is simple as you see something that is wrong then you get cracking,“Callan Park was probably part of the biggest influences of my life, as far as making decisions as to what I was going to do with it,“It was simply meant it created what I became, people become different things according to their childhood.” Fast forward to Val’s days at the University of Sydney where she pursued her dream of becoming a defense lawyer.“I did social work when I started, I wanted to be a lawyer, being a woman you could be an ordinary lawyer but I wanted to be up defending people that didn’t work because women were not allowed to in those days,” she says“By the time I finished my course the war ended, the men had returned from war and they were given the first go,“We were not able to carry on with that degree so I became a school teacher for  three years, during which time I got married then we came up to live in Queensland because of my husband.” In 1932 Queensland was not the sunny get-away we all know and love. Back then Val says it was like coming back into the dark ages.“It was a long time ago it was a very different world. It was the first few years in Brisbane that I thought was pretty boring, when we came here I was horrified I had one little child,” she says “She was three when we came up, even she realised it was different to Sydney,“Women stayed at home, they didn’t even work at tuck shops or anything like that it was really weird place in those days they just did nothing except stay at home and look after the children, WWW.CELEBRATELIVINGHISTORY.COM.AU
  8. 8. P H O T O B Y M A R T I N R . S M I T H It is no surprise that Val is crazy about debating, while she was allowed to debate in Sydney there was barriers in Brisbane.“When we came to Brisbane women were not allowed to, I was just so frustrated,Somebody in the debating union was doing a final of some sort and at the last minute the man was crook, they thought they had to give up as it was an interstate thing they didn’t want to,” she says“Barry my husband said my wife debates in Sydney but up here she hasn’t been able. Anyway we debated and we won the competition and after that I continued to do debating, “After that it was vey interesting from that point on there were other people that believed what I was saying was right, about women and what they should be doing,“After the debating thing a lot of women came with me and we set up a debating organisation for women.” WWW.CELEBRATELIVINGHISTORY.COM.AU ' “The people in the street, sort of got to know each other really well that was good,“There was nothing to do, they were not going out and doing anything.”Val was fired up when her husband asked her to speak about the role of a businessman’s wife at a corporate group.“ That made me angry to start with, I did make the point, there was a role for women of course with her husband, they also had an obligation to be herself, “she says“To be part of the community to not just be a woman as a mother and wife but she also had an obligation outside of that to the community, “I believe in everyone doing their bit, that was the way it was always, your bit is not just within the four walls of your house, your bit could be out contributing to the community at the same time, that was the speech I made and it caused a huge ruckus.”
  9. 9. P H O T O B Y M A R T I N R . S M I T H With her passion for education it was no wonder Val trotted off to Queensland University of Technology asking for a job. “I taught expression and communication and that’s what made me interested in journalism,” she says“QUT visualised sending me to America to learn how the American’s taught journalism. I was really interested in that, I went over to America and set up the journalist course, which worked out well, “Women were not regarded as a specimen for journalism, the various odds and sods on the tree of journalism was all males and they did not think females were capable.”Despite this Val said there were lots of females wanting to break into journalism. However it was difficult to find them work in the media.“So I took the girls around Queensland and asked the media to take them on for work experience,” she says“I got told no, and I persuaded them to let me do so. I said its not going to hurt you its not going to charge you anything “When the time came six months later for them to graduate phone calls were like we don’t want a man we want a woman, the women are more trustworthy,“I think that was a vey good victory.”Val was at Queensland University of Technology for 17 years and went on to build courses that pioneered the way for today. After her role as an academic and the birth of her grandchildren another path lit its way for Val to conquer.“That’s when I started Older Persons Speaking Out, I thought older people in Queensland were not getting a fair go, I thought it was very important to set up an organisation that would act as a sort of guardian of older people and their rights,” she says“, WWW.CELEBRATELIVINGHISTORY.COM.AU
  10. 10. P H O T O B Y M A R T I N R . S M I T H Give older people themselves, skills to fight for themselves. And to do that, we had to train older people and give them the skills to be able to fight for their rights,“We were fighting for the rights of older people but also educating the community about the reality of aging. That ageing can be fun. Your never too old to learn new skills If Val could give any advice to the younger generation she would say the most important thing of all is to never give up on anything, your not here for you, you are here to make a difference.“What is the use of having a world, if the people in it are not prepared to make a difference, we would all be back in the dark ages because every person who dares to make a difference contributes just that bit more to humanity,” she says“We are all here to contribute something along the line, never give up, don’t let the bastards get at you. In memory of Val French who passed away on 12/03/20. I would like to share the feature story I wrote about her in 2014. She was an amazing person who shined the way for many future female journalists.- Bev Wilkinson WWW.CELEBRATELIVINGHISTORY.COM.AU ' '
  11. 11. P H O T O B Y M A R T I N R . S M I T H Meet David Pagotto who founded SIXGUN a digital marketing agency in Melbourne Australia. Who is an older person that you admire and why? I really admire Pam Ahern, the founder of Edgar’s Mission. Her charity is funded solely by public donations, with her farm looking after over four-hundred animals. Her passionate dedication and ability to turn her dream into reality is truly inspiring. She’s a remarkable woman.The moral of the story here is don’t stop doing what you love – it takes time to build something remarkable. WWW.CELEBRATELIVINGHISTORY.COM.AU ' '
  12. 12. Thanks to our sponsors and supporters WWW.CELEBRATELIVINGHISTORY.COM.AU

June 2020 edition

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