An Incentive for Nutrition

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An Incentive for Nutrition

  1. 1. the group
  2. 2. an incentive for nutitrion
  3. 3. “If the urban culture lacks interestand incentive to eat nutritious foods,then the culture will remain living aunhealthy lifestyle.”
  4. 4. “This could be thefirst generation that won’t outlive their parents.” -Oprah Winfrey
  5. 5. Food History Timeline1800’s 1900’s 1930’s 1950’s1970’s 1990’s Present Present 1990’s
  6. 6. From Farms to FactoriesSmall local farms could Industrialized factories couldprovide enough food for provided enough food to feedsmall communities a growing population
  7. 7. The Big Producers PEPSICO NESTLEKRAFT FOODSTYSON FOODS
  8. 8. THREE COMPANIES SLAUGHTER AND PACK JBS 12% 57% OF ALL Tyson 17% Smithfield 26% US PORKTHREE COMPANIES PROCESS MORE THAN Tyson 28% 70% OF ALL Cargill 24% JBS 24% THE US BEEFTWO COMPANIES SLAUGHTER AND PACK 40% OF ALL Tyson 22% US CHICKENS JBS 18%
  9. 9. PreservativesAcidity-caking Flavor Enhancers Packaging GasesAnti-foaming Flavoring Agents PreservativesAntioxidants Flour Treatment PropellantsBulking Agents Foaming Agents Raising AgentsColorings Gelling Agents SequestrantsEmulsifiers Glazing Agents StabilizersEmulsifying Salts Humectants SweetenersFirming Agents Modified Starches Thickeners
  10. 10. 1960 vs. GMO
  11. 11. 30 countries, including France, Italy,and Japan, have already banned orrestricted GMOs, while the U.S. stilldoesn’t even require GMO labeling.
  12. 12. Empty Calories vs. Full Calories
  13. 13. Hydrogen Ions pH -1.0 XXX 0. 5 - + veil pork 1.5-2 .0 stomach acid tuna 2.4 beef 2.5 2.9 vinegar blueberry 3.5 grapefruit 4.5 chicken 5. 0 duck 5. 0 5.5 6.5 7.0 water neutral pH baking soda 6.5 -7.4 coconut avocado7.34- 7.45 blood lime 7.7-8.3 sea water9.0- 10.0 soap 11.5 12.5 bleach 13.5 13.9 sodium hydrate
  14. 14. So What Does This All Mean?
  15. 15. severe allergic reactions antibiotic resistance immune suppression cancer
  16. 16. Obesity Incline Within Children 20%
  17. 17. Why do weeat this way? -Marketing -Convenience-Cost/Budgets for family -It’s familiar
  18. 18. Consumers outlookon healthy food is.... - Too expensive - Too hard to maintain - Too inconvenient - We don’t know how to eat healthy
  19. 19. Can we develop a way to change howwe buy, perceive, and consume food?
  20. 20. Could developing a way to eat thatis affordable, convenient, and nutritionalsolve this problem...
  21. 21. Could developing a way to eat thatis affordable, convenient, and nutritionalsolve this problem...thus ensuring the health of ourchildren and family?
  22. 22. “If Indiana prospective families are provided a way toeat that’s affordable, convenient, and nutritional, thenthey will adapt to a more balanced lifestyle.”
  23. 23. Our Expert HelpPaul MontoyaUrban Garden manager at IUPUIStudies: Geography, International StudiesJanet Meryl KriegerSociologist and Folklorist at IUPUIKristina PostmaBlogger of snackhealthy.com ProspectiveLisa Staten Audience HelpDirector of Social/Behavioral Services Keriann RichCommunity Health Engagement Research Working mother with young children, runsTeam at Indiana University Hothouse CommunicationsMelissa Cyders Theresa GoodwinIUPUI Health Service Provider Entrepreneur and mother of two youngin Psychology children
  24. 24. SourcesCoveney, John. Food, Morals, and Meaning: The Pleasure and Anxiety of Eating. London and New York: Routledge, 2006. Print.Bosshart, David. Cheap: The Real Cost of the Global Trend for Bargains, Discounts & Consumer Choice. London: Kogan Page, 2006. Print.Freeman, Andrea. Fast Food: Oppression Through Poor Nutrition. Rep.Web. Ursell, Amanda. What Are You Really Eating?: How to Become Label Savvy. Carlsbad, CA: Hay House, 2005. Print.Institute of Medicine. Dietary Reference Intakes for Energy, Carbohydrate, Fiber, Fat, Fatty Acids, Cholesterol, Protein, and Amino Acids. Washington (DC): The National Academies Press; 2002.
  25. 25. Food, Inc. Dir. Robert Kenner. Perf. Michael Pollan. Magnolia Pictures, 2008. DVD.Bostrom, Meg. Perceptions of the U.S. Food System: What and How Americans Think about Their Food. Battle Creek, MI: W.K. Kellogg Foundation, 2005. Print.Pearson, Owen. “Why Do People Often Not Eat Healthy Foods?” LIVESTRONG.COM. Livestrong, 10 Mar. 2011. Web. 27 Sept. 2012. <http://www.livestrong.com/ article/400320-why-do-people-often-not-eat-healthy-foods/>.“Food Processing Top 100 Food and Beverage Companies.” Food Processing Top 100 Food and Beverage Companies. Foodprocessing.com, 2012. Web. 27 Sept. 2012. <http://www.foodprocessing.com/top100/>.“Real Food.” Ecomom.com. Ecomom, n.d. Web. 27 Sept. 2012. <http://www.eco mom.com/>.
  26. 26. Mitchell, P. C., and R. W. Welch. “Food Processing: A Century of Change.” British Med ical Bulletin (2000): n. pag. Print.Ophardt, Charles. “PH Scale.” PH Scale. Elmhurst College, 2003. Web. 30 Sept. 2012. <http://www.elmhurst.edu/~chm/vchembook/184ph.html>.

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