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Educating the Market--Creating Value Through Support of Continuing Medical Education Report Summary

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This case study highlights key marketing activities that contributed to Requip’s commercial success. Individually the activities were well planned and executed but in combination produced a synergistic effect that catapulted a low profile condition into the minds of patients and scripts of physicians

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Educating the Market--Creating Value Through Support of Continuing Medical Education Report Summary

  1. 1. BEST PRACTICES,®LLCopyright© 2006Educating The Market: CreatingValue Through Support of ContinuingMedical EducationBest Practices, LLC - Report Sample
  2. 2. BEST PRACTICES,®LLCopyright© 2006Table of Contents Research Background Summary of Key Findings, Insights & Trends Current CME Structural Trends Leveraging Budgetary Resources Accelerated Evolution: Aligning Resources, Targets &Applicable Lessons Learned CME Functional Management Building Talent Depth, Breadth & Competence: CME Optimizing CME Delivery Channels Cultivating E-Learning CME Content Management CME Lessons Learned Appendix About Best Practices, LLC
  3. 3. BEST PRACTICES,®LLCopyright© 2006Using Field Benchmarks to AssessCurrent Trends & Future Directionsof CME in North America andEurope & Map the Path to FutureCME Success in Both RegionsResearch Background:
  4. 4. BEST PRACTICES,®LL44Copyright© Best Practices®, LLCKey Study Objectives What is the current landscape ofcontinuing medical education inNorth America and Europe? What structural forms are used todeploy CME, optimize budgets &best deliver content? How rapidly is E-CME advancing? What CME delivery channels arepreferred? What are the current trends andfuture directions of CME?Best Practices, LLC conducted this research to identify the most important current trends and futuredirections of Continuous Medical Education (CME) in the North American and European marketplace.Research partners participated in a quantitative benchmark study and also contributed their qtheir qualitativethoughts, observations and narratives detailing the evolving CME landscape.Research Objective and MethodologyStudy Objective & Methodology Benchmark research examined theexisting North American andevolving European CME landscapeand probed how companiesstructure their CME functions tobest deliver educational content tomedical professionals. Study data, findings and insightswere developed using in-depth“lessons learned” interviews withCME corporate leaders and CMEproviders – as well as through adetailed on-line CME benchmarksurvey.
  5. 5. BEST PRACTICES,®LL55Copyright© Best Practices®, LLCUniverse of Learning: North American ParticipantsThirty CME leaders and practitioners from twenty-six pharmaceutical andbiotechnology companies shared their strategies and perspectives on CME inthe North American marketplace.
  6. 6. BEST PRACTICES,®LL66Copyright© Best Practices®, LLCUniverse of Learning: European ParticipationExecutives from eighteen pharmaceutical and biotechnology companies make-up the sets of data and insights specific to European Continuing Education.
  7. 7. BEST PRACTICES,®LL77Copyright© Best Practices®, LLCUniverse of Learning: CME VendorsSeven CME vendors also participated in the research – contributing insights, data andobservations from the perspective of third-party Medical Education providers.
  8. 8. BEST PRACTICES,®LL88Copyright© Best Practices®, LLCMedical Education leaders and managers primarily from North American and Europeancountries contributed insights, observations, data and commentary for this research. Datafrom North America and Europe were segmented to provide comparative results.Partner LocationsPartner Job Levels & Titles C-Level: CEO, President, Principal Vice Presidents: Global Commercial Development,Global Marketing, Marketing, Marketing Services,Medical Affairs, Professional Education Directors: Commercial Development, HealthEducation, Global Conference, Global MedicalEducation, Independent Medical Education, MedicalAffairs, Medical Communications, Medical Education,Professional Education, World-Wide Marketing Managers: Continuing Education, GlobalProfessional Relations, Group Product Manager,Independent Medical Education, InternationalProducts, Marketing, Medical AffairsAustralia Greece SwedenCanada India SwitzerlandDenmark Italy United KingdomFrance Mexico United StatesGermany South AfricaInsights Span the Global Bio-Pharma Market
  9. 9. BEST PRACTICES,®LL99Copyright© Best Practices®, LLCParticipants Oversee Diverse CME FunctionsBenchmark partners serve across multiple CME functions, Brand groups and RegionalMarketing Organizations. Benchmark levels range from Vice President to Manager. Allparticipants had direct or indirect responsibility for CME activities in their countries,regions, brands or therapeutic areas.Benchmark Class RepresentativesBenchmark Class Representatives CEO Director, Commercial Development Director, Health Education Director, Global Conference Department Director, Global Medical Education Director, Independent Medical Education Director, Medical Affairs Director, Medical Communications Director, Medical Education Director, Medical Education & Scientific Media Director, Professional Education Director, World-Wide Marketing Group Product Manager International Product Manager Manager, Continuing Education CEO Director, Commercial Development Director, Health Education Director, Global Conference Department Director, Global Medical Education Director, Independent Medical Education Director, Medical Affairs Director, Medical Communications Director, Medical Education Director, Medical Education & Scientific Media Director, Professional Education Director, World-Wide Marketing Group Product Manager International Product Manager Manager, Continuing Education Manager, Global Professional Relations Manager, Independent Medical Education Manager, Medical Affairs Marketing Manager President Principal Senior Director, Oncology Senior Marketing Manager Senior Director VP, Global Commercial Development VP, Global Marketing VP, Marketing VP, Marketing Services VP, Medical Affairs VP, Professional Education Manager, Global Professional Relations Manager, Independent Medical Education Manager, Medical Affairs Marketing Manager President Principal Senior Director, Oncology Senior Marketing Manager Senior Director VP, Global Commercial Development VP, Global Marketing VP, Marketing VP, Marketing Services VP, Medical Affairs VP, Professional Education
  10. 10. BEST PRACTICES,®LLCopyright© 2006Summary of Key Findings,Insights & Trends
  11. 11. BEST PRACTICES,®LL1111Copyright© Best Practices®, LLCInsight #1: Decentralized CME Structures PrevailDecentralized Management Structures proliferate across the CME landscape wherelanguage differences, learning style differences, and local market variation createhurdles for centralized management structures.Key Findings1. Decentralized Structures Reflect Balkanized CME Landscape:• Rapid Evolution of Structures: Especially in Europe, the CME landscape is a tapestry of nations atdifferent stages of evolution; as if by “natural selection” in their given markets, different decentralizedstructures spring up.• Three Epicenters of Emergent CME Forms: Countries requiring their physicians to maintainongoing educational levels cluster in three epicenters: North America, Big 5 European Countries and SouthAfrica. However, their collective impact is not yet so broad-reaching as to set global or regional standards.• Cross-border Variation: Significant variation exists regarding CME requirements and policy acrossregions, countries and local states. A greater number of countries have no CME requirements firmly in place.In response, various structures, approaches and strategies have evolved to meet local needs.• Decentralized Structures Favor Local Market Response: The majority of benchmarkcompanies do not utilize a globally centralized function for CME management or oversight. Companiesemploying such centralized structures report significant impact through increased leverage of budgets andheadcount. However, decentralized structures are more typical – reflecting the rapidly evolving CMEmarketplace and need to reflect local market requirements.
  12. 12. BEST PRACTICES,®LLCopyright© 2006Current CME Structural Trends
  13. 13. BEST PRACTICES,®LL1313Copyright© Best Practices®, LLCDecentralized CME Structures Proliferate36.0%32.0%0.0%4.0%18.0%11.0%CentralizedOversight, LocalManagementCentralizedOversight,RegionalManagementIndependentOversight perRegionLocal Oversightper CountryOversight withSeparateOperatingCompanyOutsourcedEntirely%ofCompaniesWithin your company, choose the one approach that best describes how the management andWithin your company, choose the one approach that best describes how the management andinfrastructure support of CME activities are organized globally across your key country units.infrastructure support of CME activities are organized globally across your key country units.(n=28)(n=28)The majority of benchmark companies do not utilize a globally centralized function for CME management oroversight. Companies employing such centralized structures report significant impact through increasedleverage of budgets and headcount. However, decentralized structures are more typical – reflecting therapidly evolving CME marketplace.DecentralizedDecentralizedStructures – 68%Structures – 68%CentralizedCentralizedStructures – 29%Structures – 29%
  14. 14. BEST PRACTICES,®LLCopyright© 2006LeveragingBudgetary Resources:Learning to Align Resources With KeyPriorities and Target Physician Groups
  15. 15. BEST PRACTICES,®LL1515Copyright© Best Practices®, LLCEngage CME Practice Communities to Accelerate Learning“The ‘Hub and Spokes’ modelfacilitates learning exchange. Theaffiliate countries come togetherthree times a year to discuss gapsand how they are building on that. Itoccurs across all therapeutic areasupport. We present: ‘Here is whatwe’re going to do from the hub.Here’s how we’re adjusting. All thespokes come back with theirinitiatives and needs. . . We also doweekly learning reviews at the hub inmy office. This happens a lot inwhich we take learning from theaffiliates (local market countries) andthen discuss among ourselves andshare with different affiliates.”–– Director of Global MedicalDirector of Global MedicalEducationEducationAccelerate learning across countries, therapeutic areas and brands through the use of councils andcommunities of practice. The “balkanized” state of CME local markets can be an obstacle to cross-borderlearning. The use of councils and best practice sharing can be a catalyst for rapid learning and sharing thatdoes not occur on its own.QuarterlyQuarterlyCross-CountryCross-CountryMeetingsMeetingsWeeklyWeeklyReviews atReviews atRegionalRegionalHeadquartersHeadquartersBest PracticeBest PracticeIdentification &Identification &SharingSharingGlobalGlobalMeetingsMeetings(1-2 Times Per Year)(1-2 Times Per Year)InformalInformalExchangeExchange(Phone, E-mail, IM)(Phone, E-mail, IM) Accelerating CMEAccelerating CMELearning & BestLearning & BestPracticesPractices
  16. 16. BEST PRACTICES,®LLCopyright© 2006CME Evolution Models:Forward-looking CME Leaders Try ToAlign Resources, Targets & ApplicableLessons Learned
  17. 17. BEST PRACTICES,®LL1717Copyright© Best Practices®, LLCPerformance measurement is a key driver of CME program effectiveness and evolution. Most benchmarkpartners acknowledge CME performance measurement is early-stage in Europe. However, CME outcomesmeasurement pilots are under way – and the Internet offers promise – even though it is still a relativelyyoung, lesser used delivery program in Europe.CME Performance Measurement EvolutionCME Performance Measurement EvolutionCME Program + Physician Interaction + Case Vignettes applicable to Physician Practice =Better CME RetentionCME ProgramAttendanceSatisfaction WithCME ProgramPost-ProgramKnowledge RetentionCME ProgramLearning ObjectivesLearning Helps PhysiciansTake Action in Patient Care& Improve Outcomes“I don’t want to imply that the Internet is the answer to all things. But the Internet is the way to go. You tell me to goread it on the Internet, I won’t do it; I’ll print it out. That’s me. Others will play on the Internet. Different learners havedifferent styles and preferences. With the Internet you can have all these case vignettes, interactivity. . . You find outwhere they are in their learning styles. . . and they can self-select where they are and how they want to learn.”-- Global Director of Medical EducationImproving CME Performance Impact
  18. 18. BEST PRACTICES,®LLCopyright© 2006CME Functional Management:Learning to Manage CME ActivitiesWith and Apart from PromotionalEducation
  19. 19. BEST PRACTICES,®LL1919Copyright© Best Practices®, LLCMedical Affairs & Communications Commonly Have CME OversightTo what functional area of the companydoes the group managing support of CMEactivities for European markets report?(n=23)(n=23)For both Europe and North America, the CME function is managed primarily within the MedicalAffairs/Communications areas. The greatest difference between markets is the significant segment managingthe function through Marketing or a separate operating company in Europe.To what functional area of the company doesthe group managing support of CMEactivities for North American markets report?(n=28)(n=28)
  20. 20. BEST PRACTICES,®LLCopyright© 2006Optimizing CME DeliveryChannels:Evolving the Best Channel DeliveryMix To Reflect Your Local Market,Budget & Target Physician Groups
  21. 21. BEST PRACTICES,®LL2121Copyright© Best Practices®, LLCFace-to-Face & E-CME Dominate in North America(n=26)(n=26)Half of North American research partners deliver CME most often through face-to-face modes – but nearlyone-quarter is delivered via the Internet. Enduring materials also make up one-fifth of delivery forms.Estimate the mix of CME delivery forms utilized by your company for the North AmericanEstimate the mix of CME delivery forms utilized by your company for the North Americanmarketplace. (Percentages should sum to 100%)marketplace. (Percentages should sum to 100%)Internet Teleconference Face-to-Face Enduring MaterialsMinimum 0% 0% 20% 0%Maximum 75% 25% 90% 50%Mean 23.9% 6.4% 50.4% 19.3%Median 20% 5% 50% 20%1stQuartile 10% 0% 32.5% 10%3rdQuartile 40% 10% 60% 25%
  22. 22. BEST PRACTICES,®LLCopyright© 2006Using Past Victories & Failures ToNavigate To Success Going ForwardCME Lessons Learned:
  23. 23. BEST PRACTICES,®LL2323Copyright© Best Practices®, LLCCME Delivery Modes: E-CMEResearch participants shared the following observations regarding E-CME:E-CME Positives:- Easier for customers- Quite cheap and fast- Available 24/7 global participation in 92 countries provides education convenience to customers thatcannot travel, have declining budgets and would like to optimize time- Twenty-four hour access- Cost effective way to reach a worldwide audience.- Reaches large audience, chosen by the participant, long lasting, reaches audience 24/7.- Internet-reach is greater- Internet provides breadth and can be interactive/participatory if adult learning principles are applied- Wide reach of audience- Broader reach than face-to-face programs- Internet is the most cost-effective, has the greatest reach, and can better manage data regardingparticipants and their learning and progression in behavior change- Internet is growing method of delivery.E-CME Negatives:- E-CME not really implemented- Not everybody likes this model- Individual relationships are not developed with company- Participants have to find it, and be fairly computer-oriented- Internet-info overload, too many portals- Little content flexibility once developed- Impersonal and can have lack of awareness of the CME supporter- Expanding e-formats with lack of success meeting program goals- Interpersonal exchange can be lost
  24. 24. BEST PRACTICES,®LLCopyright© 2006Appendix
  25. 25. BEST PRACTICES,®LL2525Copyright© Best Practices®, LLCBest Practices, LLC6350 Quadrangle Drive, Suite 200,Chapel Hill, NC 27517(919) 403-0251bestpractices@best-in-class.comwww.best-in-class.comAbout Best Practices, LLCWe are a research and consulting firm that conducts work based on the simple, yet profoundprinciple that organizations can chart a course to superior economic performance by studyingthe best business practices, operating tactics and winning strategies of world-class companies.Link for Report: Creating Value Through Support of Continuing Medical Education

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