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Mobile Phone Coverage 
Please don't let this interrupt the training 
Please set your phone to silent
The facilities 
Please advise us when you are going anywhere offsite – particularly when at Owen Springs. 
The facilities ...
The Training Team 
Ben Sparrow –AusPlots Director 
Richard Flitton–AusPlots Field Team –Soils Lead 
Emrys J Leitch -AusPlo...
About Our Method 
•Practicality/pragmatism has had to prevail 
•“It’s not about developing the perfect method, but rather ...
Modularity of Method 
•The method has been designed in modules 
•Ease of use in the field 
•For your own purposes (not Aus...
AusPlots Method 
Developed initially for rangelands –Now expanding to other regions. 
“It’s not about compatible method, b...
Structure of each Day 
7:00 amBreakfast 
7:20 amSummary of day 
8:00 amLeave homestead 
8:30 amArrive at field sites 
10:3...
AusPlotsTrainingOverview 
Today –5 Theory Sessions 
1stsession -Context 
2ndsession -Stratification, Data uses, Manual, Pe...
AusPlotsSurvey Method TrainingSession 1 
October 5th–8th–Alice Springs / Owen Springs NT 
Ben Sparrow 
AusPlots Director 
...
Setting the Scene: A series of short presentations to provide context 
TERN Overview 
Plot Capabilities 
Supersites 
LTERN...
TERN OVERVIEW
Australia’s Terrestrial Ecosystem Research Network: Supporting Ecosystem Science and Management 
By: Professors Stuart Phi...
•TERN’s Vision is for an Australian ecosystem science community that has undergone transformational change -from one in wh...
• Uses for collaborative research infrastructure, TERN’s approach 
Get Data 
Do fieldwork 
Publish Data 
Integration and S...
•Australian ecosystems and ecosystem data collection 
Sources: NASA, Geosciences Australia, Bureau of Meteorology and CSIR...
•TERN provides “infrastructure” to enable development of a sustainable network of peopleand ecosystem data collection, dis...
•TERN’s infrastructure for ecosystem science
Instruments 
+ Sensors 
Policy + 
Management 
Analysis 
+ Synthesis 
Modelling 
Data 
Searching 
Data 
Sharing 
Data Curat...
•Ecosystem science research cycle(s) 
• 
Storage, 
preservation and 
discoverability 
of data 
Data analysis, 
integration...
•TERN’s impact on research data sharing –helping change 
•Facility data storage portals –discipline relevant support 
•Dat...
Current ecosystem science and management challenges 
•Lack of accessible mechanisms for inter-linking science and policy a...
Essential Data Collection, Analysis, Modelling and Synthesis 
•Establish ecosystem variables collected through TERN 
Ausco...
International Partners 
TERN is supported by the Australian Government through 
the National Collaborative Research Infras...
LTERN overview, achievements and challenges
Objective 
To integrate key established plot networks across Australia to tackle critical questions associated with the im...
Design 
A sustainable set of long-term data collection procedures and archives from plots across Australian ecosystems mea...
Infrastructure 
The design of the plots and data collection procedures provides infrastructure to allow the research commu...
Contributions to TERN’s overall mission to date 
Transforming Australian ecosystem science: TERN will provide the infrastr...
2.Strategic foundational planning, recruitment and business processes
3.Simple and cost-effective communication
4.Data publication 
In October 2013 the LTERN Data Portal went live on the National Server Program hosted by NeCTAR. 
Soft...
5.Synthesis and communication of knowledge to researchers, policy-makers and the general public
Planned contributions to TERN’s mission in 2014 
Priority areas for LTERN are: (1) data collection; (2) data 
management a...
Risks and opportunities for the Facility and/or TERN as a whole 
RISKS 
•Lack of data delivery during EIF undermining refu...
Critical next steps 
SHORT-TERM Musts 
•Deliver on EIF promises 
•Provision of Project Data by 30 June (or seek a contract...
A new approach to intensive ecosystem research: introducing the Australian SuperSite Network
Multi-Scale Plot System
• TERN’s%infrastructure%for%ecosystem%science%
SuperSites: a definition 
1) An intensive field station in a typical 
and important biome 
2)Physical instrumentation 
3)S...
Core activities 
Vegetation plot “Core 1 Ha” – field monitoring 
Plant physiological measures 
Soil/water measurements 
Fa...
SuperSite Network 2014
SuperSite Questions 
How do key ecosystems respond to environmental change? 
Science questions to inform large scale envir...
A collaborativeNetwork approach 
Consistent monitoring protocols -AusCover, AusPlots, Soils, Coastal Facilities 
Each Supe...
TERN consistent data delivery 
Data discoverable through the TERN Data Portal and SuperSites portal
Alice Mulga SuperSite 
"How does climate variability affect vegetation water-use and groundwater recharge in an arid-zone ...
Alice Mulga SuperSite 
1)Alice Mulga node 
2)Tea-Tree node 
•OzFluxtowers (2) operational 
•AusCover campaign completed 
•...
The Australian Transect Network 
Stefan Caddy-Retalicand Ian Fox
Why transects? 
•Environmental gradients 
•Climatic, fire, altitude, oceanic, disturbance 
•Space as a proxy for time 
•Ob...
Major research infrastructure program for Australia 
>$55M funding + considerable institution support 
University of Queen...
TERN’s infrastructure for ecosystem science
Driving Science Questions 
1.How do species abundances, species composition, species richness and ecological function chan...
Australian Transect Network 
Spinifex Hummock Grassland 
Tropical Savanna 
NATT 
North Australian Tropical Transect 
SWATT...
Current Status 
•NATT 
•9 sites in 6 bioregions 
•SWATT 
•40 sites in 6 bioregions 
•TREND 
•35 sites in 3 bioregions 
•BA...
Prof Alan Andersen, CSIRO 
Subcontinental‐scale transects for assessing and monitoring ecological change in Australia 
Nor...
South West Australian Transitional Transect (SWATT) 
Stephen van Leeuwen and Margaret Byrne, WA DPaW 
Transect from Walpol...
Transect for Environmental Monitoring and Decision-making 
Legend 
Heysen Trail 
Mean Annual Maximum Temperature 
Annual R...
Transect establishment 
35 Plots 
AusPlots Method 
floral composition 
veg structure 
soil characterisation 
metagen...
Connecting the public to research is a TREND priority. 
This needs to be a two-way dialogue.
Path forward 
•New questions and interests 
•Creating a cohesive network 
•Demonstrating infrastructure value 
•Identifyin...
AusPlotsForestsBen Sparrow
What is AusPlots-Forests 
•originally conceived to build upon collaboration between the UTasand ABARES 
•collated and anal...
•the scope and the design of Ausplots-Forests has been flexible. 
•not limited to remeasuring the existing permanent plot ...
However 
•beyond scope of Ausplots-Forests to provide a comprehensive forest monitoring framework (i.e. Continental Forest...
•They extend the macro-climatic gradients and bioregions across the continent. 
•Plot data show that growth trends related...
•TEF are valued as water catchments, flora & conservation, recreation and timber and fibre production. 
•TEF are the focus...
Three design scenarios within the TEF considered: 
1.Grid-based design e.gCFMF and FPMRIS 
2.Stratified clusters of new or...
•Allocate 8-10 plots to each state 
•Target locations that are relatively undisturbed by timber harvesting (‘BOO’ sites) 
...
•Species, status , location and DBH of all trees >10cm DBH (all tagged). These trees must be tagged. 
•Species, status and...
AusPlotsRangelandsBen Sparrow
Objectives of AusPlots-Rangelands 
National network of surveillance and ecosystem baseline assessment sites 
INFRASTRUCTUR...
81% of Australia 
Wide variety of environments 
Wide climatic variation 
Generally Data poor / gaps
Hutchinson et. al., 2005
Political Complexity 
(= running total) 
Jurisdictions 5 
Many Universities 4(9) 
Departments per Jurisdiction 2(18) 
Sect...
AusPlots -Rangelands 
A surveillance monitoring program for rangeland Australia 
Ben Sparrow 
AusPlots Director 
And the A...
Why Ausplots? 
AusPlots is a Surveillance monitoring Program for Australia that: 
•informs on stocks of key ecosystem attr...
After Eyre et. al. 2011
How is it achieved? 
Extensive Networking / Collaboration / input to the process 
Engage with Agricultural, Environmental,...
Field team 
•Based in Adelaide 
•Provides consistency 
•Best way to use scarce resources – Would prefer to have state base...
>330 Plots in 12 Bioregions
Prentice/Dong u diag 
Relates to a series of Temperature variables 
Relates to a series of Moisture variables
Future Work
Internal collaborations 
Another 100 Plots across the rangelands 
Continued collaboration with other facilities 
Calperum ...
International collaboration 
PhotopointEnquiries 
AusPlots Trial on the Tibetan plateau 
Interactions with similar program...
Bringing ecological data together for re-use 
Presentation thanks to Andrew Graham
Eco-informatics Objectives (NCRIS) 
2. Form sustainable data sharing and access partnerships 
3. Integrate key 
ecological...
ÆKOS Niche in National Ecosystem Data Space
The ÆKOS Model
Data Discovery
Key Challenges in Managing Ecosystem Data 
Dispersal 
Diversity 
Comprehension 
Observation Data Capture Form 
Observation...
Complexity of Method
Description 
Observation data 
AEKOS 
Repository 
Methods and processes 
Classification
The Jessup Transect
The Classification “Problem” 
i 
D 
i 
i 
i 
i 
i 
D 
D 
D 
? 
? 
i 
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AUSPLOTS Data Flow
ÆKOS Operating Model 
AEKOS 
Consumer 
Provider 
Data 
ÆKOS Repository 
Mapping Script (ETL DSL) 
Context Doc. 
ÆKOS Porta...
Contact us 
For more information on ÆKOS and the Eco-informatics Facility 
please get in touch with: 
Craig Walker -Eco-in...
Ausplots Training - Session 1
Ausplots Training - Session 1
Ausplots Training - Session 1
Ausplots Training - Session 1
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Ausplots Training - Session 1

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Ausplots Training - Session 1

  1. 1. Mobile Phone Coverage Please don't let this interrupt the training Please set your phone to silent
  2. 2. The facilities Please advise us when you are going anywhere offsite – particularly when at Owen Springs. The facilities here at the Desert Park and at Owen Springs
  3. 3. The Training Team Ben Sparrow –AusPlots Director Richard Flitton–AusPlots Field Team –Soils Lead Emrys J Leitch -AusPlots Field Team –Vegetation lead Christina Pahl –AusPlots Data Curator Finn Hutchings –AusPlots Field Officer Sally O’Neill –AusPlots NERP Fauna Lead Dominic Wundke –AusPlots NERP Condition Officer. Andrew Tokmakoff –AusPlots Technical Lead Assisted by: Caleb Coish Nikki Thurgate The Eco-informatics team ---
  4. 4. About Our Method •Practicality/pragmatism has had to prevail •“It’s not about developing the perfect method, but rather understanding how imperfect the method is.” •We would prefer to present the formal training (days) regarding the method “as is”.... If you have any ideas or concerns we would be happy to hear/ discuss them each evening
  5. 5. Modularity of Method •The method has been designed in modules •Ease of use in the field •For your own purposes (not AusPlots funded) there is the possibility of only including some modules •For AusPlots and training purposes we will cover all modules •Extra modules are likely to be developed in the future and will be covered later in the training
  6. 6. AusPlots Method Developed initially for rangelands –Now expanding to other regions. “It’s not about compatible method, but rather compatible data.” Eg. Wheelpointv steppointv method as used here Eg. Canon vsNikon Let’s work together to ensure data compatibility
  7. 7. Structure of each Day 7:00 amBreakfast 7:20 amSummary of day 8:00 amLeave homestead 8:30 amArrive at field sites 10:30 amMorning tea 11:00 am Field Training 12:30 amLunch on Site 1:15 pmField Training 3:00 pmArvo tea 3:30 pmField Training 5:30 pmReturn to Homestead 6:00pmFree time 7:00 pmDinner 8:00 pm +Free time/ informal discussions on method
  8. 8. AusPlotsTrainingOverview Today –5 Theory Sessions 1stsession -Context 2ndsession -Stratification, Data uses, Manual, Permissions 3rdsession -Plot layout, Site info, Point Intercept, Basal Wedge, Structural summary 4thSession -Vouchering, Fauna, Photopoints 5thSession -Soils, LAI, Slats, The App Two Methods of learning: Two sides to the one coin Learning about the same method, but learning in different ways –Both ways present issues/ consideration that are not covered by the other way.
  9. 9. AusPlotsSurvey Method TrainingSession 1 October 5th–8th–Alice Springs / Owen Springs NT Ben Sparrow AusPlots Director ben.sparrow@adelaide.edu.au: 08 8313 1201
  10. 10. Setting the Scene: A series of short presentations to provide context TERN Overview Plot Capabilities Supersites LTERN Transect AusPlots–Forests AusPlots–Rangelands Eco-informatics AusCover, EMAST, Soils, OzFlux, ACEAS, Coast, Comms
  11. 11. TERN OVERVIEW
  12. 12. Australia’s Terrestrial Ecosystem Research Network: Supporting Ecosystem Science and Management By: Professors Stuart Phinn and Andrew Lowe TERN -Associate Science Directors + Prof Tim Clancy, Dr Suzanne Long, Dr Bek Christensen, Dr Siddeswara Guru +TERN Facility Directors Robson CkSupersite Sept.2012 –Source S.Long
  13. 13. •TERN’s Vision is for an Australian ecosystem science community that has undergone transformational change -from one in which effort is frequently fragmented, duplicative and short-term, to one that is national, networked, and delivering for Australia’s future.
  14. 14. • Uses for collaborative research infrastructure, TERN’s approach Get Data Do fieldwork Publish Data Integration and Synthesis Modelling Connect
  15. 15. •Australian ecosystems and ecosystem data collection Sources: NASA, Geosciences Australia, Bureau of Meteorology and CSIRO Land Cover Elevation Soils Mean Annual Run-off
  16. 16. •TERN provides “infrastructure” to enable development of a sustainable network of peopleand ecosystem data collection, discoveryand sharingsystems for advancing ecosystem science and management in Australia. •TERN’s Scope Instruments + Sensors Policy + Management Analysis + Synthesis Modelling Data Searching Data Sharing Data Curation + Publishing Data Storage Processing + Analysis Collection Methods
  17. 17. •TERN’s infrastructure for ecosystem science
  18. 18. Instruments + Sensors Policy + Management Analysis + Synthesis Modelling Data Searching Data Sharing Data Curation + Publishing Data Storage Processing + Analysis Collection Methods
  19. 19. •Ecosystem science research cycle(s) • Storage, preservation and discoverability of data Data analysis, integration and synthesis r Ecosystem Science Data + meta-data, licensing Research output: new data and publications Enables large scale and coordinated data collection, sharing and multiple re-uses Enhanced ability to revise, question and expand knowledge Knowledge gap: research questions Proposal and planning Data collection, verification, quality assurance and control
  20. 20. •TERN’s impact on research data sharing –helping change •Facility data storage portals –discipline relevant support •Data and meta-entry tools and protocols •Meta-data standards •TERN Licences and Licensing Framework •Links to national research data catalogue •International standard Digital Object Identifiers (DOI) •Replicable, extendable and scale-able model for data storage and publishing
  21. 21. Current ecosystem science and management challenges •Lack of accessible mechanisms for inter-linking science and policy at all levels of government? •Assured funding for pure and applied research –at sufficient levels and on a sustainable basis •Lack of a defined ecosystem science community and lobby •Lack of a coordinated, longer term, strategic vision for ecosystem research in Australia Source: Longstaff, B.J., T.J.B. Carruthers, W.C. Dennison, T.R. Lookingbill, J.M. Hawkey, J.E. Thomas, E.C. Wicks, and J. Woerner(eds) Integrating and applying science: A handbook for effective coastal ecosystem assessment. IAN Press, Cambridge, Maryland.U.S.A.,
  22. 22. Essential Data Collection, Analysis, Modelling and Synthesis •Establish ecosystem variables collected through TERN Auscover Ozflux LTERN Coasts Soils Supersites Network
  23. 23. International Partners TERN is supported by the Australian Government through the National Collaborative Research Infrastructure Strategy and the Super Science Initiative
  24. 24. LTERN overview, achievements and challenges
  25. 25. Objective To integrate key established plot networks across Australia to tackle critical questions associated with the impacts of disturbance on Australian ecosystems
  26. 26. Design A sustainable set of long-term data collection procedures and archives from plots across Australian ecosystems measuring selected flora, fauna and biophysical processes
  27. 27. Infrastructure The design of the plots and data collection procedures provides infrastructure to allow the research community to: Develop a detailed understanding of key ecosystem functions and processes, over decadal periods from plot to landscape scales Quantify critical relationships between vegetation condition and/or biodiversity and major disturbance regimes such as those associated with fire, logging, livestock grazing, invasive species, extreme weather events, and their interactions with climate change
  28. 28. Contributions to TERN’s overall mission to date Transforming Australian ecosystem science: TERN will provide the infrastructure and networks to underpin a coordinated, collaborative ecosystem science community that is delivering for Australia’s ecosystem scientists, managers and decision-makers. 1.The creation of a harmonious and productive network –established culture of trust and reciprocity
  29. 29. 2.Strategic foundational planning, recruitment and business processes
  30. 30. 3.Simple and cost-effective communication
  31. 31. 4.Data publication In October 2013 the LTERN Data Portal went live on the National Server Program hosted by NeCTAR. Software Hardware People Process & Documentation
  32. 32. 5.Synthesis and communication of knowledge to researchers, policy-makers and the general public
  33. 33. Planned contributions to TERN’s mission in 2014 Priority areas for LTERN are: (1) data collection; (2) data management and publication; and (3) the synthesis and communication of knowledge to researchers, policy-makers and the general public. •Ongoing publication of data through the LTERN portal •Design and initiation of the book data publication project •Delivery of the statistical review of terrestrial plot networks within TERN •Ecosystem Assessments papers in a special edition of Austral Ecology •Updated Publications Catalogue •Lessons and Insights booklet •Joint group scientific paper –the ‘2050 paper’ •Implementation of the Affiliate Scholar model •Public version of the conceptual design document
  34. 34. Risks and opportunities for the Facility and/or TERN as a whole RISKS •Lack of data delivery during EIF undermining refunding potential •Loss of staff due to burn-out and funding uncertainty •Continued under-resourcing leading to a destabilisation of current culture •A non-data collection focussed model resulting in a dismantling of LTERN •A lack of ‘meeting of the minds’ re data publishing leading to a dismantling of LTERN •TERN wide: over selling leading to an inability to deliver too big and ambitious to be coherent and sustainable. OPPORTUNITIES •To protect and nourish what we have created •To form linkages with other Facilities through ‘proof of concept’ projects – Biomass paper, Google project, and E-Mast collaborations re climate profiles for LTERN sites •Form tangible international linkages -IUCN RLE process, Bates et al Biodiversity dynamics: meta-analysis
  35. 35. Critical next steps SHORT-TERM Musts •Deliver on EIF promises •Provision of Project Data by 30 June (or seek a contract variation) •2013-2014 Financial Year Update Report due 15 July •TERN Final EIF Report 30 September 2014 •Deliver statistical review on 1 August 2014 •Negotiate and execute NCRIS contracts •Stabilise the data portal team MID-TERM •Reflect, adapt, and plan •Bid preparation for NCRIS 15-16 funding •Publish the Monitoring Insights Booklet By June 2015 •Deliver on NCRIS promises (i.e. Scope of Works) and then some if time and energy permits….
  36. 36. A new approach to intensive ecosystem research: introducing the Australian SuperSite Network
  37. 37. Multi-Scale Plot System
  38. 38. • TERN’s%infrastructure%for%ecosystem%science%
  39. 39. SuperSites: a definition 1) An intensive field station in a typical and important biome 2)Physical instrumentation 3)Scientists and technical support staff 4)Transect or Contrasts (10-400km)
  40. 40. Core activities Vegetation plot “Core 1 Ha” – field monitoring Plant physiological measures Soil/water measurements Faunal monitoring – field and sensor monitoring Data/Web portal - linked to TERN portal and ANDS OzFlux system – biogeochemical fluxes, microclimate Figure 1: Schematic layout of SuperSite core 1 ha vegetation 3.2 Plot!alignment!and!marking! 1. Standard!plot!alignment!will!be!N<S,!E<W!with!corners!located!System! (GPS).! Plot! configuration! and! alignment! can! topography! or! limited! area! of! land<type),! ensuring! a! consistent! dimensions!and!corners!are!recorded.!! 2. It!will!be!important!to!notify!data<users!when!plots!are!not!3. All!plots!will!be!permanently!marked!in!at!least!two!opposing!using!steel!star!posts!or!similar!and!labelled!with!durable!that!additional!permanent!markers!every!10!m!along!each!collection.!! 4 Measurement! 4.1 Summary!of!Measurements!for!Core!1!ha!Plots! prevailing!! winds! SW! NE! 100! m! 100! m! Core!1!ha!Plot! Flux! Tower!
  41. 41. SuperSite Network 2014
  42. 42. SuperSite Questions How do key ecosystems respond to environmental change? Science questions to inform large scale environmental management/policy: Some questions are best answered by using anetwork •Do contrasting ecosystems differ in their vulnerability to extreme weather events such as droughts and heat-waves? •Can ‘tipping points’ be identified and do those tipping points differ among contrasting environments? Science questions to inform local environmental management: Some questions have specific importance to stakeholders involved in the Supersite •Forestry management approaches in Tasmania •Carbon farming strategies in the Northern Territory •Climate resilient restoration of Western Australian wheat belt
  43. 43. A collaborativeNetwork approach Consistent monitoring protocols -AusCover, AusPlots, Soils, Coastal Facilities Each SuperSite hosts a flux tower -OzFluxData collated across spatial & temporal scales -used for modelling eMAST
  44. 44. TERN consistent data delivery Data discoverable through the TERN Data Portal and SuperSites portal
  45. 45. Alice Mulga SuperSite "How does climate variability affect vegetation water-use and groundwater recharge in an arid-zone Acacia savanna woodland"
  46. 46. Alice Mulga SuperSite 1)Alice Mulga node 2)Tea-Tree node •OzFluxtowers (2) operational •AusCover campaign completed •Hydrology -large number of bores and nested peizometers •Acoustic recorders •Sapflowsensors and loggers •Vegetation monitoring
  47. 47. The Australian Transect Network Stefan Caddy-Retalicand Ian Fox
  48. 48. Why transects? •Environmental gradients •Climatic, fire, altitude, oceanic, disturbance •Space as a proxy for time •Observations •Translocations •Flexible methodology •Core parameters (cfAusPlots) •Citizen science
  49. 49. Major research infrastructure program for Australia >$55M funding + considerable institution support University of Queensland, University of Adelaide, CSIRO, ANU, Macquarie University, JCU +
  50. 50. TERN’s infrastructure for ecosystem science
  51. 51. Driving Science Questions 1.How do species abundances, species composition, species richness and ecological function change along large-scale environmental gradients? 2.Is there predictable variation in ecosystem resilience? 3.How might ecosystems respond to climate change? •What information to land managers need to ensure species have the best opportunity to adapt in a changing environment? •Where are the important areas for native species (e.g. refugia)? •What will ecosystems look like in the future? •Will we see novel ecosystems develop?
  52. 52. Australian Transect Network Spinifex Hummock Grassland Tropical Savanna NATT North Australian Tropical Transect SWATT South West Australian Transitional Transect BATS Biodiversity and Adaptation Transect Sydney Acacia Shrubland TREND TRansect for ENvironmental monitoring and Decision making Eucalypt Forest Subtropical forest Eucalypt Open Woodland
  53. 53. Current Status •NATT •9 sites in 6 bioregions •SWATT •40 sites in 6 bioregions •TREND •35 sites in 3 bioregions •BATS •Assessment underway •More surveys planned
  54. 54. Prof Alan Andersen, CSIRO Subcontinental‐scale transects for assessing and monitoring ecological change in Australia Northern Australian Tropical Transect (NATT)
  55. 55. South West Australian Transitional Transect (SWATT) Stephen van Leeuwen and Margaret Byrne, WA DPaW Transect from Walpole to Credo Station to Lorna Glen •10 sites along the transect
  56. 56. Transect for Environmental Monitoring and Decision-making Legend Heysen Trail Mean Annual Maximum Temperature Annual Rainfall Contours (100 mm) 23 ˚C 24 ˚C 25 ˚C 26 ˚C 27 ˚C 28 ˚C 17 ˚C 18 ˚C 19 ˚C 20 ˚C 21 ˚C 22 ˚C !( Terrestrial Ecosystem Monitoring Sites Vegetation turn-over quantified Guerin & Lowe EMAS 2012 Guerin et al. 2013
  57. 57. Transect establishment 35 Plots AusPlots Method floral composition veg structure soil characterisation metagenomics photopoints etc Temperature loggers δ13C & δ15N isotopes •samples temperature and moisture gradient •altitudinal variation to compare geographic + environmental distance
  58. 58. Connecting the public to research is a TREND priority. This needs to be a two-way dialogue.
  59. 59. Path forward •New questions and interests •Creating a cohesive network •Demonstrating infrastructure value •Identifying new opportunities •collaborations •funding •continental transects
  60. 60. AusPlotsForestsBen Sparrow
  61. 61. What is AusPlots-Forests •originally conceived to build upon collaboration between the UTasand ABARES •collated and analysed a large number of existing State based Permanent Forestry Plots. •The original concept was for Ausplots-Forests to remeasure a subset of this existing plot network (n=200)
  62. 62. •the scope and the design of Ausplots-Forests has been flexible. •not limited to remeasuring the existing permanent plot infrastructure. •establish a plot-based monitoring network that improves understanding of tree growth, forest productivity and carbon dynamics research and, •and build upon existing plot networks where possible. The Scope of Ausplots-Forests
  63. 63. However •beyond scope of Ausplots-Forests to provide a comprehensive forest monitoring framework (i.e. Continental Forest Monitoring Framework). •TERN and Auplots-Forests was not established to answer specific research questions provide flexible baseline infrastructure •vision for Ausplots-Forests is to incorporate aspects of both ‘surveillance’ and ‘question driven monitoring’. •Does not collect biodiversity information at this stage. Ausplots-Forests
  64. 64. •They extend the macro-climatic gradients and bioregions across the continent. •Plot data show that growth trends related to trends in mean annual temperature, rainfall seasonality and mean annual rainfall. •TEF are fire-driven ecosystems and plots in these systems provides an opportunity for post-fire response studies, •TEF an important component of forest carbon store and contain some of the most carbon dense stands. Why Tall Eucalypt Forests (TEF)?
  65. 65. •TEF are valued as water catchments, flora & conservation, recreation and timber and fibre production. •TEF are the focus of many forest research initiatives (i.e. Warra Supersite, ForestCheck). Why Tall Eucalypt Forests (TEF)?
  66. 66. Three design scenarios within the TEF considered: 1.Grid-based design e.gCFMF and FPMRIS 2.Stratified clusters of new or existing plots: many small plots. 3.Clusters of few (n=50), large (1.0ha) plots across Tall Open Eucalypt Forest Estate No 3 is preferred -based upon the RAINFOR forest plot network Design Scenarios
  67. 67. •Allocate 8-10 plots to each state •Target locations that are relatively undisturbed by timber harvesting (‘BOO’ sites) •Target either (a) mature forests only (>60 year since fire) •Co-locate with well curatedexisting permanent growth plots or ongoing research sites •Target sites long-term plot security. e.g. reserves How?
  68. 68. •Species, status , location and DBH of all trees >10cm DBH (all tagged). These trees must be tagged. •Species, status and DBH of seedlings and saplings •Floristics and voucher specimens •Crown cover •Coarse woody debris transects •Soil sampling Which Attributes?
  69. 69. AusPlotsRangelandsBen Sparrow
  70. 70. Objectives of AusPlots-Rangelands National network of surveillance and ecosystem baseline assessment sites INFRASTRUCTURE Developing standardisedplot assessment methods to be used for measuring and sampling vegetation and soils, and Developing and implementing a stratification process to decide the locations of plots, which is applicable at a continental scale, and Establish permanent plots (approximately 750) throughout the Australian range- land bioregions where baseline surveys of vegetation and soils will be conducted by Implementing the plot assessment methods developed for measuring and sampling vegetation and soils -in the locations decided, and -analysingthe samples collected, and Storing the data and making it freely available
  71. 71. 81% of Australia Wide variety of environments Wide climatic variation Generally Data poor / gaps
  72. 72. Hutchinson et. al., 2005
  73. 73. Political Complexity (= running total) Jurisdictions 5 Many Universities 4(9) Departments per Jurisdiction 2(18) Sections per Department 2 (36) People per Section need to be involved 3(108) AusPlots–R Protocols and Standards Reference Group 15 (123) Partnerships and Operations Ref Gp13(136) + Auscoverand TERN Soils 2x3 (142) + Conservation based NGOs 20 (162) + ESA 30 (192) + National committees 4x10 (232) Federal departments 2x2x4(248) + Short Timeline (Completed by mid/late 2013..... ARGHHHHH!) That’s a heap of people to keep happy in a really short Time
  74. 74. AusPlots -Rangelands A surveillance monitoring program for rangeland Australia Ben Sparrow AusPlots Director And the AusPlots team
  75. 75. Why Ausplots? AusPlots is a Surveillance monitoring Program for Australia that: •informs on stocks of key ecosystem attributes •addressed rangeland knowledge gaps •provides Baseline information for Australia •aims to repeat measures –once is not enough •uses consistent methods across jurisdictions •that will help inform on some of our great challenges: •climate change •weeds •disturbance •distribution of species
  76. 76. After Eyre et. al. 2011
  77. 77. How is it achieved? Extensive Networking / Collaboration / input to the process Engage with Agricultural, Environmental, Forestry communities as well as NGO’s – Input from all Rangeland States and Territories SA SA National National National Collaborator TAS QLD NSW NSW NSW NT WA WA NSW National TERN TERN TERN TERN QLD
  78. 78. Field team •Based in Adelaide •Provides consistency •Best way to use scarce resources – Would prefer to have state based teams in the future if funding allowed. •Well equipped •Can train others •Work in conjunction with state agencies where possible.
  79. 79. >330 Plots in 12 Bioregions
  80. 80. Prentice/Dong u diag Relates to a series of Temperature variables Relates to a series of Moisture variables
  81. 81. Future Work
  82. 82. Internal collaborations Another 100 Plots across the rangelands Continued collaboration with other facilities Calperum GWW Litchfield Ti-Tree Desert Plots Alpine Mallee NATT SWATT TREND Validation Rapid Field measures Lidar/ Photopoints Modelling inputs Data and sample provision Ausplotsprovides a common thread through these facilities
  83. 83. International collaboration PhotopointEnquiries AusPlots Trial on the Tibetan plateau Interactions with similar programs in the EU and UK Representation on ILTER
  84. 84. Bringing ecological data together for re-use Presentation thanks to Andrew Graham
  85. 85. Eco-informatics Objectives (NCRIS) 2. Form sustainable data sharing and access partnerships 3. Integrate key ecological datasets nationally for consistent re-use 4. Provide single ‘point of access’ to ecological data 5. Provide an integrated infrastructure to support researcher data submission 1. Develop standards and a national framework for managing ecological data
  86. 86. ÆKOS Niche in National Ecosystem Data Space
  87. 87. The ÆKOS Model
  88. 88. Data Discovery
  89. 89. Key Challenges in Managing Ecosystem Data Dispersal Diversity Comprehension Observation Data Capture Form Observation & measurement process Fragmentation Data storage and expression classifications methods
  90. 90. Complexity of Method
  91. 91. Description Observation data AEKOS Repository Methods and processes Classification
  92. 92. The Jessup Transect
  93. 93. The Classification “Problem” i D i i i i i D D D ? ? i i
  94. 94. AUSPLOTS Data Flow
  95. 95. ÆKOS Operating Model AEKOS Consumer Provider Data ÆKOS Repository Mapping Script (ETL DSL) Context Doc. ÆKOS Portal Index Tagging Supporting Information Data Extract Periodic data refresh license filter ÆKOS provides ETL (Extract-Transform-Load)to extract, map, contextualise and index provider data.
  96. 96. Contact us For more information on ÆKOS and the Eco-informatics Facility please get in touch with: Craig Walker -Eco-informatics Coordinator P: (08) 8313 1139 M: 0408 813 104 E:craig.walker@adelaide.edu.au

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