Adjusting the Focus: Usability Study AlignsOrganization Vision with Community Needs                                       ...
In this session, you will learn…•    Who we are•    How we set up this sponsored project•    How we structured our user re...
Who we are                Carol Barnum, Ph.D.                Southern Polytechnic State University, Marietta/Atlanta, Geor...
How we set up this sponsored project• Find a sponsor      – IEEE, Candace Beach, Sr. Mgr., Web Presence      – Kasmore Rhe...
Sponsor goals• Content, Communication, Collaboration      – How well does the site communicate its purpose?      – Member-...
Original home pageIPCC 2012 Communicating Vision   10/9/2012
Sponsor-suggested tasks•    Learn about the site•    Find and comment on a news item•    Navigate the site•    Return to t...
How we structured user research•    Created personas from research•    Conducted heuristic evaluation•    Developed test p...
How teams approached testingIPCC 2012 Communicating Vision   10/9/2012
How teams approached testing                                      Diverging Tactics                            Team 1  Spo...
Personas                                      Professional                                       Engineers Sponsor input E...
Personas                                             Professional Engineers                                             • ...
Heuristics                     Nielsen’s 10 Heuristics                     Well known, Specific, Objective                ...
HeuristicsNielsen’s 10 Heuristics                         Quesenbery’s 5 Es 1. Visibility of system status                ...
Identified problem areas•    Navigation•    Terminology•    Homepage•    Registration•    Social mediaIPCC 2012 Communicat...
Screening and recruitmentPre-qualifying selector• Demographics• Engineering field/major• Community service• Technology ena...
User ID        Professionals Engineers     Engineering StudentsU1             26, male, civil eng,        Senior, male, me...
Test days• 2 rooms• One-way mirror• Multiple cameras/  angles• Desk top computer• DVD recorder• Morae recording  and logge...
Test days•    Think aloud protocol•    Pre and post test questions•    Pre and post task questions•    Scenarios/tasks•   ...
Test daysModerator script“You’ll notice that I’ll bereading from this paper mostof the time. This may seemstrange or awkwa...
Test days Teams diverge again • Product reaction cards • Eye trackingIPCC 2012 Communicating Vision   10/9/2012
What we learnedBoth teams collected data from participantsthrough testing.                             Usability          ...
Eye Guide eye tracking system• EyeGuide developed by Grinbath, run by  several Texas Tech professors• Easy to set up and u...
Eye tracking resultsIPCC 2012 Communicating Vision   10/9/2012
Product reaction cardsDeveloped by Microsoft, includes 118 index cards witha single adjective (60% positive, 40% negative)...
Additional qualitative tools• Comments recorded from Morae• Organic interactions with participants – gave  the team an opp...
Qualitative insights  QuantitativedataQualitative responses from participants wereconverted and presented as quantitative...
Positive findings•    Look and feel•    Mission•    Wealth of information•    Expressed interest in returning to siteIPCC ...
Additional findings•    Navigation was difficult•    Terminology was confusing•    Homepage was unclear•    Registration w...
Similar results• All participants had trouble with the password  requirements during registration. Participants  averaged ...
Different methods, same conclusions•    Different personas•    Different heuristics•    Different tools•    Developed sepa...
Participant findings videosIPCC 2012 Communicating Vision   10/9/2012
What we recommended•    Redesign navigation•    Clarify terminology•    Revise homepage•    Simplify registration•    Inte...
Redesign navigationUnaware ofsliding topmenu, makingnavigationdifficultIPCC 2012 Communicating Vision   10/9/2012
Redesign navigationDifficult to findmembers in thememberdirectoryIPCC 2012 Communicating Vision   10/9/2012
Redesign navigation: WireframeIPCC 2012 Communicating Vision   10/9/2012
Clarify terminologyInitially unableto determinethe purpose ofsite and actionsto take IPCC 2012 Communicating Vision   10/9...
Clarify terminologyDid not know toclick “Help solvethis challenge” tojoin a workspace,and were unableto complete thetask I...
Clarify terminologyDid not recognizedifferencebetweenworkspaces andthe SolutionsLibrary IPCC 2012 Communicating Vision   1...
Clarify terminologyUnsure aboutthe purpose of aworkspaceIPCC 2012 Communicating Vision   10/9/2012
Revise homepageUnclear purposeand script errorIPCC 2012 Communicating Vision   10/9/2012
Revise homepageDifficulty findinglist ofworkspaces IPCC 2012 Communicating Vision   10/9/2012
Revise homepageUnable to readscrolling textIPCC 2012 Communicating Vision   10/9/2012
Revise homepageDistracted bynumber ofelementsIPCC 2012 Communicating Vision   10/9/2012
Simplify registrationTrouble withregistrationpasswordrequirement IPCC 2012 Communicating Vision   10/9/2012
Simplify registrationNegativereaction toCaptchasecurityapplicationIPCC 2012 Communicating Vision   10/9/2012
Simplify registrationConfused anddistracted bylocation fieldand mapfunctionIPCC 2012 Communicating Vision   10/9/2012
Simplify registrationProvideincentive forregistering andprovidinginformationIPCC 2012 Communicating Vision   10/9/2012
Integrate social mediaSmall social medialinks go unnoticedIPCC 2012 Communicating Vision   10/9/2012
Conduct additional testing • Conduct follow up testing to confirm   effectiveness of recommended   improvements • Use broa...
Implementation•    E4C reaction to test•    Goals met•    Changes•    Results•    Way forward                             ...
IPCC 2012 Communicating Vision   10/9/2012
QuestionsIPCC 2012 Communicating Vision   10/9/2012
Detailed findings and recommendations can be found in theteam reports listed on the Usability Testing Essentials Website u...
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Adjusting the Focus: Usability Study Aligns Organization Vision with Community Needs

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One project sponsored by IEEE, two teams of Southern Polytechnic State University graduate students, one structured approach taught by Dr. Carol Barnum, amazing overlapping results. Professor Carol Barnum, together with her graduate students, Laurie Bennett, Jay Jones, and John Weaver present the approach, findings, and recommendations revealed during their usability study conducted for the IEEE website, Engineeringforchange.org. Learn how their different paths taken during the usability study resulted in identifying the same show stopping problem areas.

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  • Thank you Dr. Barnum, and thank you all for being here today. I’m going to talk about how the teams approached testing. The theme you are going to hear is that we had 2 teams, there were some commonalities in our approaches, then we diverged , but we still ended up with overlapping results, leading to a more focused vision for the E4C website.As Dr. Barnum mentioned, we had two teams of 4 working on this study. Both teams attended the project kickoff meeting, had access to the same background information, and sponsor concerns. We both structured our user research in the manner that Dr. Barnum described, creating personas and conducting heuristic evaluations. However, almost immediately the team approaches began to diverge. Let’s start with the commonalities. Common process:planning for testing-Test planning:personas,heuristics,pre-test questions,scenarios/taskspost-test questionsParticipants:screening, recruitingTest day:lab, moderator script, test toolsAnalyzed dataReported and presented findings and recommendations
  • Starting with our user research, we created personas. Using input from the sponsor and data from the E4C user profiles, we all agreed the typical users included American and international professional engineers and engineering students. They came from a variety of engineering disciplines and were overwhelmingly interested in using their skills to solve problems that could benefit others. Once the personas were completed, the teams began to diverge in their approaches. Given the time constraints, each team could conduct testing for only one user type. Team 1 chose to test professional engineers to give the sponsor test results from the view point of their primary users. They planned to test the website from the POV of their persona, Elsie Manning, a 52 year old manufacturing engineer. Team 1 recognized they may face problems finding professional engineers willing to participate in the study but they were confident that their personal networks would provide a supply of recruits. Team 2 chose to test engineering students, who are a high percentage of secondary users, this also gave the sponsor an alternate view point. They planned to test from the POV of their persona, Michael Samford, a 22 year old civil engineering student. Team 2 knew would have no problem recruiting participants later since they had a large student population they could draw from at SPSU.
  • Using this typical user information, we conducted personal interviews of people that match the types and came up with personas. Although more than one persona exists for the e4c site, each team could only choose one and here the teams diverged in their choices. Once the personas were completed, the teams began to diverge in their approaches. Given the time constraints, each team could conduct testing for only one user type. Team 1 chose to test professional engineers to give the sponsor test results from the view point of their primary users. They planned to test the website from the POV of their persona, Elsie Manning, a 52 year old manufacturing engineer. Team 1 recognized they may face problems finding professional engineers willing to participate in the study but they were confident that their personal networks would provide a supply of recruits. Team 2 chose to test engineering students, who are a high percentage of secondary users, this also gave the sponsor an alternate view point. They planned to test from the POV of their persona, Michael Samford, a 22 year old civil engineering student. Team 2 knew would have no problem recruiting participants later since they had a large student population they could draw from at SPSU.
  • The next step was for each team to perform a heuristic evaluation. The teams followed a common approach which was to choose a set of heuristics and each member on the team was to independently evaluated the E4C website based on the heuristics chosen and from the viewpoint of their user type. That being said, the teams immediately diverged and chose different sets of heuristics. Team 1 chose Nielsen’s 10 heuristics which are well known but also for the specific and objective evaluation criteria and Team 2 chose Quesenbery’s5Es – they provided the same comprehensive assessment while also providing enough flexibility to provide a holistic evaluation of the various site elements and functions. Although the decisions were made independently, as it turned out, the choices provided an opportunity to test the ‘process’..where would the different heuristic choices take us?
  • Here is a list of the heuristics for anyone not familiar with them and where you can access them online
  • These were possible show stoppers – these categories are repeated in findings/recommendations sectionsThe heuristic evaluations led each team to identify problem areas for further testing, and the teams drafted scenarios or stories with tasks embedded for participants to walk through in order to test their reactions – the two teams came up with different criteria for drafting those scenarios, due to the difference in the heuristics chosen
  • It was time to start identifying qualified participants for testing. For the commonalities, both teams used a pre-screening questionnaire or a selector to begin qualifying participants- they asked basic demographic questions, confirmed that candidates were engineers, either professionally or as students and which engineering discipline they were involved in, asked about their interest or participation in community service, verified they were technically literate, and verified they were available to attend the testing sessions, and were open to being recorded for this study. We also let them know that a $25 would be provided by the sponsor to selected participants. Again, at this point the teams diverged.Team 2 on the other hand had no trouble finding candidates that fit their user profile, as you can see they received over 60 responses indicating interest in participating.The user types the teams chose immediately impacted the recruitment process and results – team 1 immediately faced challenges attracting a pool large enough to be selective –due to a lack of response we modified the participant requirements - while we preferred a combination of men and women engineers, aged 45 and older, we modified the criteria to accept any age as long as they were a practicing engineer and community service minded.
  • Despite the differences encountered, both teams recruited 6 participants – 1 practice participant and 5 participants whose data points were collected, recorded, and evaluated as part of the study. Note the limitation of the Professionals participant pool – all males in similar age bracket
  • Once test day arrived, both teams used the same student usability lab – we had access to the same materials you see here – Note that each team conducted mulitple testing days that took place over the course of several weeks
  • And we followed similar procedures – although the questions, scenarios, and tasks varied by team
  • We both used a moderator script for consistency
  • John Weaver will nowaddress the findings
  • Team organized cards based on comments.Insert image of cards laid out on a table or maybe an image of a few cardsShould we make a comment how people generally try to be positive
  • Participants commented positively on the look of the E4C SITE, including imagery and media Participants recognized the good that E4C organization works toward. Participants commented favorably towards the wealth of information and content available. Over half of the participants expressed an interest in returning to the site.
  • After determining the issues, both groups provided recommendations, which fell into the following high-level categories:Navigation format/options, language, homepage changes, registration/membership, social media promotion.Recommendations to client based on data and verified by video- Recommendations were arrived at using qualitative and quantitative tools, which produced qualitative and quantitative findings. Our 2 groups using different tools to arrive at same insights (similar but different paths, we were not guessing – proven methodologies) Hufflepuff did not test/ask questions about Social Media.
  • Change the slidingmenu so that all major links are visible at once.
  • Change the sliding/hidden menu so that all major links are visible at once. Allow users to search E4C members by name and/or user name, and/or location in the members directory.
  • Expose all links (goes back to the sliding menu issue)Use conventional F-Pattern – possibly add navigation for specific groups or purposes Eyetracking shows not much viewing of links, more of picture and text
  • The current mission statement is long and difficult to read. Create a concise, and prominent mission statement on the home page.Use more meaningful pictures that show engineering projects in order to visually communicate the mission statement. Ensure all images relate to their corresponding text. Change the sliding/hidden menu so that all major links are visible at once.Rename primary links to communication actions that can be taken on the E4C website.
  • Consider renaming button to “Join this workspace” or “Work on this project.”Create labels based on the user’s languageConduct a card sort to determine the most meaningful button name.
  • Change the sliding/hidden menu so that all major links are visible at once. Evaluate link names and conduct a card sort to determine the most meaningful link names. Consider renaming “Solutions Library” to “WorkspaceLibrary” or “Projects Library”. Add a clear, concise, and meaningful statement that describes the purpose of these areas on their main pages.
  • Evaluate link names and conduct a card sort to determine the most meaningful link names. Consider renaming “Workspaces” to “Projects”. Use their language.Add a clear, concise, and meaningful statement that describes the purpose of a workspace on the main workspaces page.
  • Focus on purpose and identity, fewer words, more pictures and accessible links, Fix script error
  • Change the sliding menu so that all major links are visible at once.
  • Allow users to pause the scrolling pictures. Slow down the scroll speed.
  • Reduce the number of elements on the home page.Evaluate the purpose of the map function and whether it belongs on the home page. Create clear labels and visual cues for actions that can be taken from the home page. Consider color changes for contrast
  • Provide instant feedback at the field level.Evaluate the need for highly complex password requirements. Make instruction easier to read with larger, darker text.
  • Evaluate the need for this level of security.
  • Eliminate the map and location field on the registration page. Location information is useful; allow users to enter it into their member profiles after completing registration.
  • Provide a reason for users to register for the siteExplain how information is going to be displayed and who has access to itProvide confirmation email upon successfully registering
  • Move social media links to more prominent location.Embed YouTube video into homepage as an additinal visual aid to explain purpose of E4C and why/how they should participate.
  • Test each improvement as you implement.Use a more diverse participant pool.
  • Let’s listen now to our client’s thoughts about testing and plans for the future.
  • If Dr. Barnum wants to make comments before opening up to questions, we can leave this slide here…if questions before wrap up then we’ll switch this with questions slide.
  • Adjusting the Focus: Usability Study Aligns Organization Vision with Community Needs

    1. 1. Adjusting the Focus: Usability Study AlignsOrganization Vision with Community Needs Dr. Carol Barnum Southern Polytechnic State University With: Laurie Bennett Jay Jones John Weaver October 9, 2012
    2. 2. In this session, you will learn…• Who we are• How we set up this sponsored project• How we structured our user research• How the teams approached user testing• What the teams learned• What happened after test results were inIPCC 2012 Communicating Vision 10/9/2012
    3. 3. Who we are Carol Barnum, Ph.D. Southern Polytechnic State University, Marietta/Atlanta, Georgia Professor, Information Design and Communication Director, SPSU IDC Graduate Program and Usability Center Award-winning consultant, author, speaker Laurie Bennett Jay Jones Communications Consultant U.S. Internal McKing Consulting Corporation Communications Manager Deloitte John Weaver Information Designer, Technical Writer InCommIPCC 2012 Communicating Vision 10/9/2012
    4. 4. How we set up this sponsored project• Find a sponsor – IEEE, Candace Beach, Sr. Mgr., Web Presence – Kasmore Rhedrick, Webmaster, IEEE/ASME• Review sponsor requirements• Preview the Engineeringforchange.org siteIPCC 2012 Communicating Vision 10/9/2012
    5. 5. Sponsor goals• Content, Communication, Collaboration – How well does the site communicate its purpose? – Member-to-member collaboration--how does it work? – Workspaces—how do people use this feature? – News content—how is it assessed? – Membership process—any barriers?IPCC 2012 Communicating Vision 10/9/2012
    6. 6. Original home pageIPCC 2012 Communicating Vision 10/9/2012
    7. 7. Sponsor-suggested tasks• Learn about the site• Find and comment on a news item• Navigate the site• Return to the homepage• Find a member/workspace of interest• Become a member• Find a solution in the Solutions LibraryIPCC 2012 Communicating Vision 10/9/2012
    8. 8. How we structured user research• Created personas from research• Conducted heuristic evaluation• Developed test plan• Recruited users from one of the personas• Conducted testing with 6 participants• Analyzed and reported results• Discovered amazing overlap in findings!IPCC 2012 Communicating Vision 10/9/2012
    9. 9. How teams approached testingIPCC 2012 Communicating Vision 10/9/2012
    10. 10. How teams approached testing Diverging Tactics Team 1 Sponsor Overlapping Structured Approach Input Results Team 2 Diverging TacticsIPCC 2012 Communicating Vision 10/9/2012
    11. 11. Personas Professional Engineers Sponsor input E4C user profile data Engineering StudentsIPCC 2012 Communicating Vision 10/9/2012
    12. 12. Personas Professional Engineers • Primary users • Recruiting concernsTypical E4C usersConducted interviews Engineering Students • Secondary users • Abundant poolIPCC 2012 Communicating Vision 10/9/2012
    13. 13. Heuristics Nielsen’s 10 Heuristics Well known, Specific, Objective Quesenbery’s 5 Es Comprehensive, Flexible, Holistic Easy to learnIPCC 2012 Communicating Vision 10/9/2012
    14. 14. HeuristicsNielsen’s 10 Heuristics Quesenbery’s 5 Es 1. Visibility of system status 1. Effective Easy to learn 2. Match between system and the real 2. Efficient world 3. Engaging 3. User control and freedom 4. Error tolerant 4. Consistency and standards 5. Easy to learn 5. Error prevention 6. Recognition rather than recall 7. Flexibility and efficiency of use www.wqusability.com 8. Aesthetic and minimalist design 9. Help users recognize, diagnose, and recover from errors 10. Help and documentation www.useit.com/papers/heuristic/ heuristic_list.htmlIPCC 2012 Communicating Vision 10/9/2012
    15. 15. Identified problem areas• Navigation• Terminology• Homepage• Registration• Social mediaIPCC 2012 Communicating Vision 10/9/2012
    16. 16. Screening and recruitmentPre-qualifying selector• Demographics• Engineering field/major• Community service• Technology enabled• Availability• Open to recording• $25 gift cardIPCC 2012 Communicating Vision 10/9/2012
    17. 17. User ID Professionals Engineers Engineering StudentsU1 26, male, civil eng, Senior, male, mechanical eng, alternative Sheltering Arms energy, solar oven project, recyclingU2 26, male, mechanical eng, Junior, female, computer & mechanical eng, Red Cross Alpha Xi Delta, autism Boy Scouts of AmericaU3 25, male, mechanical eng, Senior, male, mechanical eng, environmental Habitat for Humanity study, animal shelterU4 31, male, mechanical eng, Sophomore, male, mechanical eng, interested Habitat for Humanity in developing regions, especially children’s Atlanta Boxer Rescue issues Humane SocietyU5 29, male, manufacturing Senior, female, civil eng, SWE President, ASCE, eng, interested but not NSBE, SPSU Rubble House project active in community serviceIPCC 2012 Communicating Vision 10/9/2012
    18. 18. Test days• 2 rooms• One-way mirror• Multiple cameras/ angles• Desk top computer• DVD recorder• Morae recording and logger softwareIPCC 2012 Communicating Vision 10/9/2012
    19. 19. Test days• Think aloud protocol• Pre and post test questions• Pre and post task questions• Scenarios/tasks• System Usability Scale (SUS)IPCC 2012 Communicating Vision 10/9/2012
    20. 20. Test daysModerator script“You’ll notice that I’ll bereading from this paper mostof the time. This may seemstrange or awkward, but wedo this to ensure that we givethe same information toeveryone.”• Consistent test format• Consistent languageIPCC 2012 Communicating Vision 10/9/2012
    21. 21. Test days Teams diverge again • Product reaction cards • Eye trackingIPCC 2012 Communicating Vision 10/9/2012
    22. 22. What we learnedBoth teams collected data from participantsthrough testing. Usability Testing User Data and Findings Recommendations Participant Quantitative Interactions ToolsIPCC 2012 Communicating Vision 10/9/2012
    23. 23. Eye Guide eye tracking system• EyeGuide developed by Grinbath, run by several Texas Tech professors• Easy to set up and use• Less than $2500http://www.grinbath.comIPCC 2012 Communicating Vision 10/9/2012
    24. 24. Eye tracking resultsIPCC 2012 Communicating Vision 10/9/2012
    25. 25. Product reaction cardsDeveloped by Microsoft, includes 118 index cards witha single adjective (60% positive, 40% negative). 5participants selected cards after test. Positive Negative Ease of Use Effortless, Simplistic, Simplistic, Easy Difficult, Hard to Use to use, Predictable, Flexible, Intuitive Content Valuable, High Quality, Engaging, Optimistic, Meaningful, Innovative, Entertaining Design Clean Inconsistent, DisruptiveIPCC 2012 Communicating Vision 10/9/2012
    26. 26. Additional qualitative tools• Comments recorded from Morae• Organic interactions with participants – gave the team an opportunity to get to know participants• Questionnaires – pre-test, post-task, and post- testIPCC 2012 Communicating Vision 10/9/2012
    27. 27. Qualitative insights  QuantitativedataQualitative responses from participants wereconverted and presented as quantitative data. SUS/Likert Scale Questions Measurable Responses•Questionnaires Eye Tracking Results  Aggregate Responses Aggregate of view of participants natural tendencies Success Rate Task completion? User Task Participant Scenarios Average time to complete Eye Tracking Results Aggregate of participant view habitsIPCC 2012 Communicating Vision 10/9/2012
    28. 28. Positive findings• Look and feel• Mission• Wealth of information• Expressed interest in returning to siteIPCC 2012 Communicating Vision 10/9/2012
    29. 29. Additional findings• Navigation was difficult• Terminology was confusing• Homepage was unclear• Registration was frustrating• Searching for members was difficultIPCC 2012 Communicating Vision 10/9/2012
    30. 30. Similar results• All participants had trouble with the password requirements during registration. Participants averaged 3 attempts.• It took participants an average of 11:07 minutes to complete the registration process.IPCC 2012 Communicating Vision 10/9/2012
    31. 31. Different methods, same conclusions• Different personas• Different heuristics• Different tools• Developed separate, but similar test plans• Findings and recommendations overlappedIPCC 2012 Communicating Vision 10/9/2012
    32. 32. Participant findings videosIPCC 2012 Communicating Vision 10/9/2012
    33. 33. What we recommended• Redesign navigation• Clarify terminology• Revise homepage• Simplify registration• Integrate social media• Conduct additional testingIPCC 2012 Communicating Vision 10/9/2012
    34. 34. Redesign navigationUnaware ofsliding topmenu, makingnavigationdifficultIPCC 2012 Communicating Vision 10/9/2012
    35. 35. Redesign navigationDifficult to findmembers in thememberdirectoryIPCC 2012 Communicating Vision 10/9/2012
    36. 36. Redesign navigation: WireframeIPCC 2012 Communicating Vision 10/9/2012
    37. 37. Clarify terminologyInitially unableto determinethe purpose ofsite and actionsto take IPCC 2012 Communicating Vision 10/9/2012
    38. 38. Clarify terminologyDid not know toclick “Help solvethis challenge” tojoin a workspace,and were unableto complete thetask IPCC 2012 Communicating Vision 10/9/2012
    39. 39. Clarify terminologyDid not recognizedifferencebetweenworkspaces andthe SolutionsLibrary IPCC 2012 Communicating Vision 10/9/2012
    40. 40. Clarify terminologyUnsure aboutthe purpose of aworkspaceIPCC 2012 Communicating Vision 10/9/2012
    41. 41. Revise homepageUnclear purposeand script errorIPCC 2012 Communicating Vision 10/9/2012
    42. 42. Revise homepageDifficulty findinglist ofworkspaces IPCC 2012 Communicating Vision 10/9/2012
    43. 43. Revise homepageUnable to readscrolling textIPCC 2012 Communicating Vision 10/9/2012
    44. 44. Revise homepageDistracted bynumber ofelementsIPCC 2012 Communicating Vision 10/9/2012
    45. 45. Simplify registrationTrouble withregistrationpasswordrequirement IPCC 2012 Communicating Vision 10/9/2012
    46. 46. Simplify registrationNegativereaction toCaptchasecurityapplicationIPCC 2012 Communicating Vision 10/9/2012
    47. 47. Simplify registrationConfused anddistracted bylocation fieldand mapfunctionIPCC 2012 Communicating Vision 10/9/2012
    48. 48. Simplify registrationProvideincentive forregistering andprovidinginformationIPCC 2012 Communicating Vision 10/9/2012
    49. 49. Integrate social mediaSmall social medialinks go unnoticedIPCC 2012 Communicating Vision 10/9/2012
    50. 50. Conduct additional testing • Conduct follow up testing to confirm effectiveness of recommended improvements • Use broader participant poolIPCC 2012 Communicating Vision 10/9/2012
    51. 51. Implementation• E4C reaction to test• Goals met• Changes• Results• Way forward Kasmore Rhedrick Online Content & Community Manager, ASME InternationalIPCC 2012 Communicating Vision 10/9/2012
    52. 52. IPCC 2012 Communicating Vision 10/9/2012
    53. 53. QuestionsIPCC 2012 Communicating Vision 10/9/2012
    54. 54. Detailed findings and recommendations can be found in theteam reports listed on the Usability Testing Essentials Website under, “Engineering for Change Web site (New, Dec.2011)” at the following link:Engineeringforchange.org Usability Study reportsURL: booksite.mkp.com/barnum/testingessentials/reports.phpThank you for coming.IPCC 2012 Communicating Vision 10/9/2012

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