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+
Using social media for
messaging about healthy
eating and active living
Ben Harris-Roxas, Urbis & UNSW
Becky Freeman, Un...
+
What is social media?
3
How has the web changed?
 What is Web 2.0?
 User generated content
 Interaction
 Exchange of content
 Social
 Dialog...
What is social media?
 “Social Media is a group of Internet-based applications
[Facebook, YouTube, Twitter] that build on...
6
7
+
Your experience
Limitations of the data and research
 Design: largely case studies
 Changing platform landscape
 Relevance of principle...
+
Who is using social media?
+
Internationally
+
Age groups online (US)
+
(Australia is similar)
Source: ABS 8146.0 - Household Use of Information Technology, Australia, 2010-11
+
Evolving picture
+
Gender
Source: Johanna Blakley, USC Study data posted at @Mojojohanna
+
Australia
Internet use in Australia
 In 2010-11, 6.2 million households had broadband internet access
 This is an increase of over...
Social networking and online
gaming
18
Households with access to a home
computer, by State or Territory, 2010-11
19
 How and when Australians access the Internet changed significantly in
2011:
 Time spent accessing mobile Internet conti...
 Australians are increasingly embracing the content creation and
interactive aspects of social media:
 39% post to websi...
 In general, Australian Internet users welcome organisations and brands
onto their social networking sites and are happy ...
Facebook
Australians are among the world‟s most
enthusiastic Facebook users, spending an
average of 7 hours and 43 minute...
+
Priority populations
+
Aboriginal groups
+
+
Rural and Remote
+
Older Australians and people with
disabilities
2003 2006/07 2009 2010/11
Older Australians (SDAC) 29% 54%
People with di...
+
People with disabilities
Source: ABS 8146.0 - Household Use of Information Technology, Australia, 2010-11
Purpose of int...
+
+
Social gradient in use
Source: ABS 8146.0 - Household Use of Information Technology, Australia, 2010-11
+
What strategies and actions for
using social media have been
effective (and ineffective)?
How many can you name?
+ 34
+
Collaborative projects
35
Organizational websites
36
+
Twitter
37
+
Online news
38
YouTube
39
Online petitions
40
Facebook
41
+
Blogs
42
Apps
43
(Ben will revisit later)
+
Systematic review findings
Moorhead SA; Hazlett DE; Harrison L; Carroll JK; Irwin A; Hoving C. (2013)
A New Dimension of...
+
+
Typology of use
+
Benefits
+
Limitations
+
Impact and outcome evaluation
Evaluation
Neiger BL, Thackeray R, Van Wagenen SA, Hanson CL, West JH,
Barnes MD, et al. Use of Social Media in Health Pro...
Process Indicators
51
52
53
Outcome evaluation
 Content analysis
 Surveys
 Qualitative approaches
54
+
Case studies
Lessons Learned
 Integration
 The effectiveness of social media campaign can be positively
affected by the use of tradit...
 Personal benefits
 Successful campaigns make users feel like a member of a
community and that they can express a part o...
 Community
 Partnerships with organisations and people who already have
large social media followings is useful
 Focus ...
 Promotion
 Motivated volunteer seeders who can leverage their personal connections with
others are far more likely to g...
 Use of social media tools
 Exploit already available everyday, familiar activists, like photo-
tagging and re-Tweeting
...
 Content
 Online campaigns work best when there is a clear and
achievable call to action
 Create fun and positive assoc...
+
+
Queensland police
during the floods
benhr.net/qldpolicefloods
+
Promising new approaches
+
What gets shared?
Factors
 Encourages/promotes interaction
 Establishes credibility
 Taps positive emotions
 Simple messaging
 Create a...
+
App-based
+ Mobile phone, smartphone and
tablet use
Source: ACMA Communications Report 2011-12 Series
49
74 74
57
48
33
15
51
76 78
...
+
App use
Source: ACMA Communications Report 2011-12 Series
2,408
2,810
3,087
2,712
3,199
3,195
3,799 3,731
3,606
3,510
3,...
+
Mobile data
Source: ABS 8153.0 - Internet Activity, Australia, December 2012
Volume of data downloaded by mobile handset...
+
+
+
+
VicHealth activity
+
Mix of app creators
+
Quantified self
+
+
Source: Swan M. (2012) The Realization of Personalized Medicine through Crowdsourcing, the Quantified Self,
and the Part...
+
Workplace-based activities
+
Challenges, barriers and enablers
+
Audiences may be more difficult to
target and define on social media
(clustering by interest may make psychographics mor...
+
Potential to exacerbate inequalities
+
Resources
 Digital advertising has been proven to be a very cost-effective tool
 Developing and promoting a successful social medi...
88
+
Risks
+
1. Do not mix the professional and the
personal in ways likely to bring your
employer into disrepute.
2. Do not undermin...
+
+
Who owns your content and
social graph?
(beware the Facebook algorithm AKA EdgeRank)
+
Promising areas for research
+
 Experimentation
 New messages
 Viral
 Funding
 Monitoring
+
Becky Freeman
becky.freeman@sydney.edu.au
@no_smoking_chik
Ben Harris-Roxas
b.harrisroxas@urbis.com.au
@ben_hr
Sian Rudg...
Using social media for messaging about healthy eating and active living
Using social media for messaging about healthy eating and active living
Using social media for messaging about healthy eating and active living
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Using social media for messaging about healthy eating and active living

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Using social media for messaging about healthy eating and active living

  1. 1. + Using social media for messaging about healthy eating and active living Ben Harris-Roxas, Urbis & UNSW Becky Freeman, University of Sydney Sian Rudge, Sax Institute
  2. 2. + What is social media?
  3. 3. 3
  4. 4. How has the web changed?  What is Web 2.0?  User generated content  Interaction  Exchange of content  Social  Dialogue  The mass adoption of online social networking means that providing quality content is no longer sufficient. Users are used to interacting with other site users and sharing quality content outside of the sites where they first locate it. 4
  5. 5. What is social media?  “Social Media is a group of Internet-based applications [Facebook, YouTube, Twitter] that build on the ideological and technological foundations of Web 2.0, and that allow the creation and exchange of user generated content.”  Source: Kaplan AM, Haenlein M. Users of the world, unite! The challenges and opportunities of Social Media. Business horizons. 2010;53(1):59-68.  New media is the combination and convergence of computing and information technology, communications networks and digitised media and information content. The interlinking of these three key pillars has arisen due to the development and popularisation of the Internet coupled with the accessibility of activities, products and services within the digital media sphere 5
  6. 6. 6
  7. 7. 7
  8. 8. + Your experience
  9. 9. Limitations of the data and research  Design: largely case studies  Changing platform landscape  Relevance of principles  Links to principles of effective messaging 9
  10. 10. + Who is using social media?
  11. 11. + Internationally
  12. 12. + Age groups online (US)
  13. 13. + (Australia is similar) Source: ABS 8146.0 - Household Use of Information Technology, Australia, 2010-11
  14. 14. + Evolving picture
  15. 15. + Gender Source: Johanna Blakley, USC Study data posted at @Mojojohanna
  16. 16. + Australia
  17. 17. Internet use in Australia  In 2010-11, 6.2 million households had broadband internet access  This is an increase of over one million households since 2008-09 – almost three quarters (73%) of all households now have broadband  Over two thirds (68%) of internet users made a purchase over the internet in 2010-11. The most popular types of purchases were travel, accommodation, memberships or tickets of any kind; and CDs, music, DVDs, videos, books or magazines.  One of the most popular activities performed on the internet was social networking. 17 Source: http://www.abs.gov.au/ausstats/abs@.nsf/Latestproducts/8146.0Media%20Release12010- 11?opendocument&tabname=Summary&prodno=8146.0&issue=2010-11&num=&view=
  18. 18. Social networking and online gaming 18
  19. 19. Households with access to a home computer, by State or Territory, 2010-11 19
  20. 20.  How and when Australians access the Internet changed significantly in 2011:  Time spent accessing mobile Internet continues to increase: 4.2 hours per week, up 20% from 3.5 hours in 2010  Multi‐screen behaviour is now a daily habit. Six in ten online Australians have used the Internet while watching TV, more than one third do it on a daily basis. 20
  21. 21.  Australians are increasingly embracing the content creation and interactive aspects of social media:  39% post to websites that invite participation  46% post on online forums  65% update their social networking profile, while 72% browse others‟ posts, photos and messages 21
  22. 22.  In general, Australian Internet users welcome organisations and brands onto their social networking sites and are happy to engage and contribute to dialogue about products and services. In 2011:  43% discussed or added personal comments about brands online  39% posted reviews of brands online on a regular basis  47% connected with an organisation via a social networking site 2
  23. 23. Facebook Australians are among the world‟s most enthusiastic Facebook users, spending an average of 7 hours and 43 minutes per month of the social networking site 25% of Australians „Like‟ or interact with a brand on Facebook on a weekly basis 57% of Australians participated in „Liking‟ brands during 2011 – up from 46% in 2010
  24. 24. + Priority populations
  25. 25. + Aboriginal groups
  26. 26. +
  27. 27. + Rural and Remote
  28. 28. + Older Australians and people with disabilities 2003 2006/07 2009 2010/11 Older Australians (SDAC) 29% 54% People with disabilities (SDAC) 41% 62% General population (MPHS) 64% 79% Source: ABS 8146.0 - Household Use of Information Technology, Australia, 2010-11 Internet access at home
  29. 29. + People with disabilities Source: ABS 8146.0 - Household Use of Information Technology, Australia, 2010-11 Purpose of internet use
  30. 30. +
  31. 31. + Social gradient in use Source: ABS 8146.0 - Household Use of Information Technology, Australia, 2010-11
  32. 32. + What strategies and actions for using social media have been effective (and ineffective)?
  33. 33. How many can you name?
  34. 34. + 34
  35. 35. + Collaborative projects 35
  36. 36. Organizational websites 36
  37. 37. + Twitter 37
  38. 38. + Online news 38
  39. 39. YouTube 39
  40. 40. Online petitions 40
  41. 41. Facebook 41
  42. 42. + Blogs 42
  43. 43. Apps 43 (Ben will revisit later)
  44. 44. + Systematic review findings Moorhead SA; Hazlett DE; Harrison L; Carroll JK; Irwin A; Hoving C. (2013) A New Dimension of Health Care: Systematic Review of the Uses, Benefits, and Limitations of Social Media for Health Communication, Journal of Medical Internet Research, 15(4):e85. doi:10.2196/jmir.1933
  45. 45. +
  46. 46. + Typology of use
  47. 47. + Benefits
  48. 48. + Limitations
  49. 49. + Impact and outcome evaluation
  50. 50. Evaluation Neiger BL, Thackeray R, Van Wagenen SA, Hanson CL, West JH, Barnes MD, et al. Use of Social Media in Health Promotion Purposes, Key Performance Indicators, and Evaluation Metrics. Health promotion practice. 2012;13(2):159-64.  1) Low engagement: an agreement or preference for content  2) Medium engagement: people are involved in creating and sharing content with the capacity to influence others  3) High engagement: actual participation in off-line interventions that results from some exposure to a social media campaign 50
  51. 51. Process Indicators 51
  52. 52. 52
  53. 53. 53
  54. 54. Outcome evaluation  Content analysis  Surveys  Qualitative approaches 54
  55. 55. + Case studies
  56. 56. Lessons Learned  Integration  The effectiveness of social media campaign can be positively affected by the use of traditional media  Integration with broader campaigns seems to be useful  social media greatly benefits from traditional media, including earned news media, that helps drive awareness 58
  57. 57.  Personal benefits  Successful campaigns make users feel like a member of a community and that they can express a part of myself to others  Opportunity to win a prize that is both relevant and desirable, not the ubiquitous iPad of most online marketing contests  Offer rewards for participating and spreading marketing messages  Participants like interacting on social media because it can be both anonymous and personal 59
  58. 58.  Community  Partnerships with organisations and people who already have large social media followings is useful  Focus on continuously building social media communities, it may then be possible to capitalise on that support for future campaigns  Online campaigns communications should routinely and explicitly ask all members and followers to help build the community as it leads not only to more followers, but more highly engaged followers 60
  59. 59.  Promotion  Motivated volunteer seeders who can leverage their personal connections with others are far more likely to generate action than impersonalised ads  Recruiting larger numbers of seeders may assist in campaign promotion  Users need to be able to easily receive and share valuable information with other people  The campaign content should promote positive discussion and sharing  A clearly bounded timeframe for a campaign creates a sense of anticipation and excitement among participants  Keep track of and use champions from previous campaigns to spread the word for emerging/new campaigns  Viral growth cannot be guaranteed or depended on, a communications strategy to ensure a strong launch and ongoing promotion of the campaign is necessary.  Promotion require continuous seeding, not as simple as one hit and then, fingers crossed, your campaign goes viral 61
  60. 60.  Use of social media tools  Exploit already available everyday, familiar activists, like photo- tagging and re-Tweeting  Do not employ any complex third party tools or require participants to register or give any personal details this can severely dissuade participation and engagement  High bounce rates to external websites suggest that click through ads on social media sites may work better if users are sent to another social media page, as opposed to being forced offsite to an external website. This works both ways, for example, the majority of Facebook page landings come from another Facebook page.  Ideally, campaigns should spread from friend to friend through the automated sharing process of existing social network page feeds, and not require further action of participants  A variety of social media vehicles and relationships can increase the participants‟ involvement in the program 62
  61. 61.  Content  Online campaigns work best when there is a clear and achievable call to action  Create fun and positive associations with your brand, or alternatively, authoritative and trustworthy may be more crucial for health organisations  Generating a large number of shares or having a campaign go viral cannot be seen as the primary, most important outcome of a social media campaign. A campaign that is both sharable and effective in motivating people to change is essential. 63
  62. 62. +
  63. 63. + Queensland police during the floods benhr.net/qldpolicefloods
  64. 64. + Promising new approaches
  65. 65. + What gets shared?
  66. 66. Factors  Encourages/promotes interaction  Establishes credibility  Taps positive emotions  Simple messaging  Create a story/narrative  Sense of urgency (very conditional though – evidence very mixed)  But feel free to ignore these too – high degree of variability about what aspects of messaging between cases/contexts  Some of these factors are also in competition, e.g. simplicity and messaging 68
  67. 67. + App-based
  68. 68. + Mobile phone, smartphone and tablet use Source: ACMA Communications Report 2011-12 Series 49 74 74 57 48 33 15 51 76 78 63 50 30 17 92 99 98 97 94 88 77 25 33 30 33 30 18 8 ALL 18–24 25–34 35–44 45–54 55–64 65+ %ofpersonsaged18yearsandover Age range Have a smartphone Use the internet via their mobile Use a mobile phone Access the internet via a tablet computer (e.g. iPad)
  69. 69. + App use Source: ACMA Communications Report 2011-12 Series 2,408 2,810 3,087 2,712 3,199 3,195 3,799 3,731 3,606 3,510 3,977 4,099 4,454 0 1,000 2,000 3,000 4,000 5,000 Numberofpersonsaged14yearsandover('000s)
  70. 70. + Mobile data Source: ABS 8153.0 - Internet Activity, Australia, December 2012 Volume of data downloaded by mobile handset in 3 month reporting period (TB) 0 2000 4000 6000 8000 10000 12000 14000 16000 Dec-11 Jun-12 Dec-12
  71. 71. +
  72. 72. +
  73. 73. +
  74. 74. + VicHealth activity
  75. 75. + Mix of app creators
  76. 76. + Quantified self
  77. 77. +
  78. 78. + Source: Swan M. (2012) The Realization of Personalized Medicine through Crowdsourcing, the Quantified Self, and the Participatory Biocitizen, J Pers Med, 2:93-118. doi:10.3390/jpm2030093
  79. 79. + Workplace-based activities
  80. 80. + Challenges, barriers and enablers
  81. 81. + Audiences may be more difficult to target and define on social media (clustering by interest may make psychographics more relevant)
  82. 82. + Potential to exacerbate inequalities
  83. 83. + Resources
  84. 84.  Digital advertising has been proven to be a very cost-effective tool  Developing and promoting a successful social media campaign may be lower cost than a mass media campaign but it can be time and human resource intensive  Simple and low tech and low cost campaigns can be highly effective when conducted through the appropriate channels  Staff  Staff need to be trained in online health promotion, social media analytics and developing shareable, content  A personal approach, from individual staff members, rather than a „”corporate” profile page may be more effective in reaching users 86 Cost
  85. 85. 88
  86. 86. + Risks
  87. 87. + 1. Do not mix the professional and the personal in ways likely to bring your employer into disrepute. 2. Do not undermine your effectiveness at work. 3. Do not imply employer endorsement of your personal views. 4. Do not disclose confidential information obtained through work.
  88. 88. +
  89. 89. + Who owns your content and social graph? (beware the Facebook algorithm AKA EdgeRank)
  90. 90. + Promising areas for research
  91. 91. +  Experimentation  New messages  Viral  Funding  Monitoring
  92. 92. + Becky Freeman becky.freeman@sydney.edu.au @no_smoking_chik Ben Harris-Roxas b.harrisroxas@urbis.com.au @ben_hr Sian Rudge sian.rudge@saxinstitute.org.au

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