Robertson ch04

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Robertson ch04

  1. 1. INTRODUCTION TO FIRE PREVENTION Seventh Edition • James C. Robertson Chapter 4 Enforcing Fire Safety Compliance Robertson, Introduction to Fire Prevention, Seventh Ed. © 2010 by Pearson Education, Inc., Upper Saddle River, NJ
  2. 2. Overview• Describe legal authority for code enforcement.• Describe the importance of plan review and its relation to code enforcement.• Identify how control of sales and use assists in fire code enforcement and give some examples. Robertson, Introduction to Fire Prevention, 7/e © 2010 by Pearson Education, Inc., Upper Saddle River, NJ
  3. 3. Overview (cont.)• Recognize how structural control is used as a means of code enforcement and give specific examples of structural control.• Identify how control of occupancy is used as a means of code enforcement and give an example of controlling occupancy. Robertson, Introduction to Fire Prevention, 7/e © 2010 by Pearson Education, Inc., Upper Saddle River, NJ
  4. 4. Overview (cont.)• Describe compliance and abatement procedures and why assurance of compliance is preferred over court action.• List some fire safety considerations in specific special types of occupancy’s. Robertson, Introduction to Fire Prevention, 7/e © 2010 by Pearson Education, Inc., Upper Saddle River, NJ
  5. 5. Publicity for Fire Codes• Media often used ineffectively• Effective use includes: – Press coverage for enactment of fire safety codes • Gives clearer idea of code coverage – Signage • “No Smoking” • Occupancy capacity Robertson, Introduction to Fire Prevention, 7/e © 2010 by Pearson Education, Inc., Upper Saddle River, NJ
  6. 6. Plan-Review Program for Fire Code Enforcement• Programs for review of plans and specifications – Qualified, trained individuals – Coordinated and carried out with building department – Rotated through fire department as procedure – Established through municipal directive Robertson, Introduction to Fire Prevention, 7/e © 2010 by Pearson Education, Inc., Upper Saddle River, NJ
  7. 7. Fire Protection Engineers• Ideal scenario for plan reviewer – Speak with authority among industry professionals • Usually civilian – Assist in long-range departmental planning – Typically found in larger but not in smaller departments Robertson, Introduction to Fire Prevention, 7/e © 2010 by Pearson Education, Inc., Upper Saddle River, NJ
  8. 8. Fire Protection Engineers• Plan-review programs should include: – Preliminary plan review • Rewarding; problems are easily changed • Architects more often provide plan review at this stage Robertson, Introduction to Fire Prevention, 7/e © 2010 by Pearson Education, Inc., Upper Saddle River, NJ
  9. 9. Microfilming of Plans• Allows retrieval of information months or years later – Desirable from a legal standpoint in case of future litigation• Reduces storage space – CAD permits retention of plans by computer Robertson, Introduction to Fire Prevention, 7/e © 2010 by Pearson Education, Inc., Upper Saddle River, NJ
  10. 10. Plan Review• Firefighter should be trained to read blue-prints – Provides some representation of fire service in plan-review process• Code backing – Designated code for reference Robertson, Introduction to Fire Prevention, 7/e © 2010 by Pearson Education, Inc., Upper Saddle River, NJ
  11. 11. Plan Review• Plan review correlation with inspection – Only effective if followed up with inspection – Requirements in plan not always carried out by builder • Cannot always be readily detected in the field • Cooperation between several agencies is essential – Insurance industry may have interest in plan review Robertson, Introduction to Fire Prevention, 7/e © 2010 by Pearson Education, Inc., Upper Saddle River, NJ
  12. 12. Removal of obstructions in exit ways is an important part of a fire inspector’s job. (Photo: U. S. FireAdministration, Federal Emergency Management Agency) Robertson, Introduction to Fire Prevention, 7/e © 2010 by Pearson Education, Inc., Upper Saddle River, NJ
  13. 13. Control of Sales• Gasoline• Hazardous materials• Fire alarm systems• Extinguishers• Explosives• Fireworks Robertson, Introduction to Fire Prevention, 7/e © 2010 by Pearson Education, Inc., Upper Saddle River, NJ
  14. 14. Control of Sales• Another means of fire abatement and prevention – Fire prevention bureau responsible for controlling: • Explosives • Gasoline • Fireworks • Fire extinguishers Robertson, Introduction to Fire Prevention, 7/e © 2010 by Pearson Education, Inc., Upper Saddle River, NJ
  15. 15. Control of Gasoline Sales• Subject in most fire prevention codes – Handling – Storage – Dispensing – Type of container Robertson, Introduction to Fire Prevention, 7/e © 2010 by Pearson Education, Inc., Upper Saddle River, NJ
  16. 16. Control of Fire Alarm Systems• Public safety function – Must be properly designed to function in an emergency – Some communities require fire alarms to be approved by the fire department Robertson, Introduction to Fire Prevention, 7/e © 2010 by Pearson Education, Inc., Upper Saddle River, NJ
  17. 17. Control of Explosives• Control of handling, storage, and sales of explosives long covered in fire prevention code• Control is function of Bureau of Alcohol, Tobacco, Firearms and Explosives – Security measures – Deactivation measures• Fireworks Robertson, Introduction to Fire Prevention, 7/e © 2010 by Pearson Education, Inc., Upper Saddle River, NJ
  18. 18. Structural Control• Includes inspection of materials, appurtenances, and other factors relating to the building – Fixed manufacturing equipment – Interior finishes – Fixed fire protection systems – Reinspections – Electrical equipment Robertson, Introduction to Fire Prevention, 7/e © 2010 by Pearson Education, Inc., Upper Saddle River, NJ
  19. 19. Adequate water supplies are essential for prevention of fire spread. (Photo: James C. Robertson) Robertson, Introduction to Fire Prevention, 7/e © 2010 by Pearson Education, Inc., Upper Saddle River, NJ
  20. 20. Control of Occupancy• Determining and posting occupancy capacity within structures – Occupancy capacity – Use of fire watch – Train company employees Robertson, Introduction to Fire Prevention, 7/e © 2010 by Pearson Education, Inc., Upper Saddle River, NJ
  21. 21. Legal Aspects• Ultimate goal is improvement of facility rather than imposition of punitive measures – Notice of violation – Injunction – Local issues – Potential liability Robertson, Introduction to Fire Prevention, 7/e © 2010 by Pearson Education, Inc., Upper Saddle River, NJ
  22. 22. Condemnation of Unsafe Structures• Power granted permitting building official to order demolition if owner fails to take corrective action – Local statutes – Authority – Demolition – Repair Robertson, Introduction to Fire Prevention, 7/e © 2010 by Pearson Education, Inc., Upper Saddle River, NJ
  23. 23. Special Occupancies• Fire prevention and life safety measures often come about as a result of tragedy – Nursing homes – Boarding homes for the elderly – High-rise structures Robertson, Introduction to Fire Prevention, 7/e © 2010 by Pearson Education, Inc., Upper Saddle River, NJ
  24. 24. Residential Sprinklers• Code development process• Mandatory requirement has been a tortuous process – San Clemente, California – Cobb County, Georgia – Prince George’s County, Maryland – Scottsdale, Arizona Robertson, Introduction to Fire Prevention, 7/e © 2010 by Pearson Education, Inc., Upper Saddle River, NJ
  25. 25. Summary• Plan review• Methods of control• Legal aspects Robertson, Introduction to Fire Prevention, 7/e © 2010 by Pearson Education, Inc., Upper Saddle River, NJ

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