Neurology

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  • In resting state, neuron is positively charged on outsied and negatively charged on inside. Similar to heart, when stimulated, Na+ rapidly enters the cell and K- leaves resulting in a loss of charge or Depolarization When the charge reaches the synapse, releases neurotransmitter Acetylcholine for parasympathetic and voluntary (somatic) Noreepinephrine for sympathetic
  • Remember the dura matter Arachnoid membrane Pia matter
  • Alt mental is sign of CNS injury or illness (ie coma) Toxic metablic states can be caused by Anoxia Diabetic Ketoacidosis Hepatic Failure Hypoglycemia Renal Failure Toxic exposure Other causes include stroke, hypertensive encephalopathy
  • Peripheral neuropathy is a malfunction or damage resulting in muscle weakness, loss of sensation, impaired reflexes, and internal organ malfunctions Mono – caused by local conditions such as trauma or infection Poly – demyelination or degeneration, immune disorders, toxic agents, metabolic disorders example – diabetes is a major cause of peripheral neuropathy to hands and feet sometimes called stocking and glove
  • Appearance Is the patient concious? Alert? Confused? Sitting upright? Speech Can the pt speak? Coherant? Full sentances? Slurred speech Skin Color, temp, moist Facial Droop Posture/gait
  • History – may be difficult to obtain due to pt alt ment. Obtain info from family. Trauma – mechanism of injury, when di it happen, LOC, incontinence, Medical – underlying med problem ie cardiac, seizures, diabetes, hypertension, has this occurred before. Environmental clures is curent meds, ETOH or dugs, chemicals hazmat Physical Exam Face – ask pt to smile and frown or show me your teeth, note any drooping or paralysis. Eyes – unilateral dilated pupils may result from increased intracranial pressure, bilateral dilated and non reactive is probably caused by brainstem injury. Constricted or pinpoint suggest toxic etiology. Check for contact lense and
  • Resp paterns – not as reliable Chyne stokes – Kussmals – Diabetic CNS Ataxic – CNS Hyperventilate pt to reduce PaCO2 and cause vasoconstriction reducing intracranial pressure
  • Sensorimotor exam Pms Decorticate posturing – flexed arms and wrists Decerebrate – extended arms and wrists, both signs of brainstem injury Muscle tone, strength, coordination and balance
  • Vitals signs Cushing’s Reflex – increased intracranial pressure Initial – pulse decrease BP increase Late – pulse increase BP decrease with increased body temp
  • Geriatric considerations – use family and staff to evaluate usual mentation
  • Alt Ment A – Acidosis, alcohol E – Epilepsy I – Infection O – Overdose U – Uremia (kidney failure) T – Trauma, tumor I – Insulin P – Psychosis, Poison S – Stroke, seizure Assessment – AVPU, use bystanders and family to evaluate and determine underlysing cause, perform physical exam to uncover any hidden injuries Management – protect airway using spinal precautions, support ventilations using suplemental oxygen obtain vitals, pulse and BP place on monitor establish IV Treatable causes determine blood glucose – “hyperglycemia produced by administration of glucose will do limited harm in the short tim before arrival at the hospital.” Narcan prn Thiamine – wernicke’s syndrome and korsakoff’s psycosis Mannitol – osmotic diuretic for increased intracranial pressure
  • Wernicke’s Sydrome – caused by thiamine deficiency, characterized by encephalopathy, irreversible memory loss, disorientation, etc. Hyperventilation reduces intracranial pressure by reducing CO2. Manitol is an oncotic diuresis, which reduces brain swelling.
  • Stroke – Brain Attack, tPA must be administered within 3 hours Occlusive stroke Embolic – may c/o severe head ache Thrombotic – s/s develop slowly Hemorrhagic – acute onset co/ headache Intracerebral Subarachnoid
  • Assessment – motor, speech and sensory deficits. Unequal pupils Soft palate deficit Syncope Facial droop Headache Dysphasia Aphasia (inability to speak) Hemiparesis (weakness) Hemiplegia (paralysis) Dizzyness
  • Distinguishing TIA Transient Ischemic Attack – may last for several hours, usually resolves in 24. History of disease
  • Causes Hypoxia Hypoglycemia Febrile Tumors Eclampsia Idiopathic epilepsy – epilepsy means the potential to develop seizures without known cause Generalized Seizures Tonic-Clonic (Grand Mal) seizures Aura LOC Tonic – muscle contraction Clonic – muscle spasm Postictal – confused During seizure, teeth remain clenched. Diaphragm is paralyzed and pt may becom cyanotic. Pt may be incontinent. Absence (Petit Mal) – short term LOC. Usually occur under 20 years of age Pseudoseizers Simple Partial Seizure (focal motor) may not involve LOC Complex partial seizure (psychomotor seizure) distinctive auras, originating in the temporal lobe
  • Continuous Headaches may be a sign of Meningitis – Particularly if they also complain of Fever Confusion Neck stiffness Nausea and vomiting Rash
  • Have they had any medication changes Include resp cardio endocrine evaluation
  • Usually progressive MD – a group of genetic diseases characterized by progressive muscle weakness and degeneration. MS - demyelination of nerve fibers, caused by autoimmune disease. Onset begins in 20 to 40s Dystonias – muscle contraction that cause twisting or repetitive movements. Or freezing in action
  • Parkinson’s is a motor system disorder which causes shaking, shuffling gaitg, rigidity or resistance to movement, bradykinesia is slowed movement. Bell’s Palsy – facial paralysis of unknown cause, recover within 3 months Lou Gehrig’s – Amyotriphic Lateral Sclerosis (ALS) – degenration of nerve cells that control voluntary movement. Eventually weakens the diaphragm which leads to breathing problems pulmonary infection and death. Polio – Poliomyelitis – infectious inflammatory viral disease of CNS that can result in paralysis.
  • Neurology

    1. 1. Neurology
    2. 2. Sections Anatomy & Physiology Pathophysiology General Assessment Findings Management of Nervous System Emergencies
    3. 3. Anatomy & Physiology The Central Nervous System  The Neuron  Protective Structures  The Brain  The Spinal Cord
    4. 4. Anatomy &Physiology  The Neuron
    5. 5. Anatomy & Physiology Protective Structures  The Skull
    6. 6. Anatomy &Physiology  Protective Structures  The Spine
    7. 7. Anatomy & Physiology Protective Structures  The Meninges
    8. 8. Anatomy & Physiology The Brain  Divisions of the Brain  Areas of Specialization
    9. 9. Anatomy & Physiology The Brain  Vascular Supply
    10. 10. Anatomy & Physiology The Spinal Cord
    11. 11. Anatomy & Physiology The Peripheral Nervous System  The Autonomic Nervous System  The Sympathetic Nervous System “Fight-or-flight”  The Parasympathetic Nervous System “Feed-or-breed” or “Rest-and-repair”
    12. 12. Pathophysiology Alteration in Cognitive Systems CNS Disorders  Structural Lesions (Tumor, contusions)  Toxic Metabolic States  Other Causes  Cardiovascular  Respiratory  Infections  Drugs
    13. 13. Pathophysiology Peripheral Nervous System Disorders  Mononeuropathy  Polyneuropathy
    14. 14. General Assessment Findings Scene Size-up and Initial Assessment  AVPU  General Appearance  Speech  Skin & Facial Drooping  Mood, Thought, Perception, Judgment, Memory, & Attention
    15. 15. General Assessment Findings Focused History & Physical Exam  History-Taking  Trauma-Related  Underlying Medical Problems  Environmental Clues  Physical Exam  Face, Eyes, Nose, & Mouth
    16. 16. GeneralAssessment Findings  Respiratory Patterns
    17. 17. General Assessment Findings  Nervous System Status • Sensorimotor Evaluation • Motor System & Cranial Nerve Status
    18. 18. GeneralAssessment Findings  Nervous System Status • Glasgow Coma Scale
    19. 19. General Assessment Findings Vital Signs • Cushing’s Reflex
    20. 20. General Assessment Findings  Other Assessment Tools • End-Tidal CO2 Detector • Pulse Oximeter • Blood Glucometer  Geriatric Considerations in Neurological Assessment Ongoing Assessment
    21. 21. Management ofNeurological Emergencies General Principles  Airway & Breathing  Circulatory Support  Pharmacological Intervention  Psychological Support  Transport Considerations
    22. 22. Altered Mental Status AEIOU-TIPS Assessment Management  Initial Assessment  IV Access  Treatable Causes  Hypoglycemia, Narcotic Overdose, Suspected Alcoholic
    23. 23. Altered Mental Status Chronic Alcoholism  Wernicke’s Syndrome  Korsakoff’s Psychosis Increased Intracranial Pressure  Hyperventilation  Mannitol
    24. 24. Stroke & Intracranial Hemorrhage Occlusive Strokes  Embolic & Thrombotic Strokes Hemorrhagic Strokes
    25. 25. Stroke & Intracranial Hemorrhage Signs  Symptoms  Facial Drooping  Confusion  Headache  Agitation  Aphasia/Dysphasia  Dizziness  Hemiparesis  Vision Problems  Hemiplegia  Paresthesia  Gait Disturbances  Incontinence
    26. 26. Stroke & Intracranial Hemorrhage Transient Ischemic Attacks  Indicative of carotid artery disease.  Symptoms of neurological deficit:  Symptoms resolve in less than 24 hours.  No long-term effects.  Evaluate through history taking:  History of HTN, prior stroke, or TIA.  Symptoms and their progression.
    27. 27. Stroke & Intracranial Hemorrhage Management  Scene safety & BSI  Maintain the airway.  Support breathing.  Obtain a detailed history.  Position the patient.  Determine the blood glucose level.  Establish IV access.  Monitor the cardiac rhythm.  Protect paralyzed extremities.
    28. 28. Stroke &IntracranialHemorrhage
    29. 29. Seizures Generalized Seizures  Tonic-Clonic  Aura  Loss of Consciousness  Tonic Phase  Hypertonic Phase  Clonic Phase  Postseizure  Postictal  Absence  Pseudoseizures
    30. 30. Seizures Partial Seizures  Simple Partial Seizures  Involve one body area.  Can progress to generalized seizure.  Complex Partial Seizures  Characterized by auras.  Typically 1–2 minutes in length.  Loss of contact with surroundings.
    31. 31. Seizures Assessment  Differentiating Between Syncope & Seizure  Bystanders frequently confuse syncope and seizure.
    32. 32. Seizures Patient History  History of Seizures  History of Head Trauma  Any Alcohol or Drug Abuse  Recent History of Fever, Headache, or Stiff Neck  History of Heart Disease, Diabetes, or Stroke  Current Medications  Phenytoin (Dilantin), phenobarbitol, valproic acid (Depakote), or carbamazepine (Tegretol)  Physical Exam  Signs of head trauma or injury to tongue, alcohol or drug abuse
    33. 33. Seizures Management  Scene safety & BSI.  Maintain the airway.  Administer high-flow oxygen.  Establish IV access.  Treat hypoglycemia if present.  Do not restrain the patient.  Protect the patient from the environment.  Maintain body temperature.
    34. 34. Seizures Management  Position the patient.  Suction if required.  Monitor cardiac rhythm.  Treat prolonged seizures.  Anticonvulsant medication  Provide a quiet atmosphere.  Transport.
    35. 35. Seizures Status Epilepticus  Two or More Generalized Seizures  Seizures occur without a return of consciousness.  Management  Management of airway and breathing is critical.  Establish IV access and cardiac monitoring.  Administer 25g 50% dextrose if hypoglycemia is present.  Administer 5–10mg diazepam IV.  Monitor the airway closely.
    36. 36. Syncope A Sudden, Temporary Loss of Consciousness Assessment  Cardiovascular.  Dysrhythmias or mechanical problems.  Noncardiovascular.  Metabolic, neurological, or psychiatric condition.  Idiopathic.  The cause remains unknown even after careful assessment.  Extended unconsciousness is NOT syncope.
    37. 37. Syncope Management  Scene safety & BSI.  Maintain the airway.  Support breathing.  Check circulatory status.  Monitor mental status.  Establish IV access.  Determine blood glucose Level.  Monitor the cardiac rhythm.  Reassure the patient and transport.
    38. 38. Headache Types  Vascular  Migraines • Throbbing pain, photosensitivity, nausea, vomiting, and sweats; more frequent in women • May last for extended periods of time.  Cluster • One-sided with nasal congestion, drooping eyelid, and irritated or watery eye; more frequent in men • Typically lasts 1–4 hours.
    39. 39. Headache Types  Tension  Organic  Occurs due to tumors, infection, or other diseases of the brain, eye, or other body system.  Headaches associated with fever, confusion, nausea, vomiting, or rash can be indicative of an infectious disease.
    40. 40. Headache Assessment  What was the patient doing at the onset of pain?  Does anything provoke or relieve the pain?  What is the quality of the pain?  Does the pain radiate to the neck, arm, back, or jaw?  What is the severity of the pain?  How long has the headache been present?
    41. 41. Headache Management  Scene safety and BSI  Maintain the airway.  Position the patient.  Establish IV access.  Determine blood glucose level.  Monitor the cardiac rhythm.  Consider medication.  Antiemetics or analgesics  Reassure the patient and transport.
    42. 42. “Weak and Dizzy” Assessment  Symptomatic of Many Illnesses  Focused Assessment  Include a detailed neurological exam.  Specific signs and symptoms: • Nystagmus • Nausea and vomiting • Dizziness
    43. 43. “Weak and Dizzy” Management  Scene safety & BSI.  Maintain airway & administer high-flow oxygen.  Position of comfort.  Establish IV access & monitor cardiac rhythm.  Determine blood glucose level.  Consider medication.  Antiemetic  Transport and reassure patient.
    44. 44. Neoplasms Tumors  Benign  Malignant Assessment  Signs & Symptoms  Recurring or severe headaches  Nausea and vomiting  Weakness or paralysis  Lack of coordination or unsteady gait  Dizziness, double vision  Seizures without a prior history of seizures
    45. 45. Neoplasms  History  Surgery, chemotherapy, radiation therapy, or holistic therapy  Experimental treatments Management  Scene size-up and BSI.  Maintain airway & administer high-flow oxygen.  Position of comfort.  Establish IV access and monitor cardiac rhythm.  Consider medication administration.  Analgesics, antiseizure meds, anti-inflammatory meds  Transport and reassure patient.
    46. 46. Brain Abscess Abscess  Collection of Pus Assessment  Signs & Symptoms  Lethargy, hemiparesis, nuchal rigidity  Headache, nausea, vomiting, seizures Management  Similar to Neoplasm
    47. 47. Degenerative Neurological Disorders Types of Disorders  Alzheimer’s Disease  Most frequent cause of dementia in the elderly.  Results in atrophy of the brain due to nerve cell death in the cerebral cortex.  Muscular Dystrophy  Characterized by progressive muscle weakness.  Multiple Sclerosis  Unpredictable disease resulting from deterioration of the myelin sheath.  Dystonias
    48. 48. Degenerative Neurological Disorders  Parkinson’s Disease  Tremor, rigidity, bradykinesia, postural instability  Central Pain Syndrome  Bell’s Palsy  Amytrophic Lateral Sclerosis  Myoclonus  Spina Bifida  Poliomyelitis
    49. 49. Degenerative Neurological Disorders Assessment  Obtain history.  Exacerbation of chronic illness or new problem? Management  Special considerations  Mobility, communication, respiratory compromise, and anxiety  Interventions  Determine blood glucose level.  Establish IV access.  Monitor cardiac rhythm.  Transport and reassure the patient.
    50. 50. Back Pain & Nontraumatic Spinal Disorders Low Back Pain Causes  Disk Injury  Vertebral Injury  Cysts & Tumors  Other Causes
    51. 51. Back Pain & Nontraumatic Spinal Disorders Assessment  Evaluate history.  Speed of onset.  Risk factors such as vibration or repeated lifting.  Determine if pain is related to a life-threatening problem. Management  Consider c-spine.  Immobilize if in doubt.  Consider analgesics.
    52. 52. Summary Anatomy & Physiology Pathophysiology General Assessment Management of Nervous System Emergencies

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