OpenPDF Manual Select AStart Point
Significant Life Moment / Significant Life Event• A Significant Life Event   impacts many people at the same time• A Signi...
How did you feel about these events?
Who AM I ?• How do people see you?• What is your perception of yourself?• How is your internal perception and their  exter...
Cue DVD – Gangland Oakland    DVD  Gangland  Oakland
Reflection• Who do you think you are?• Where do you think you’re going?• How do you plan to get there?Materials Needed•Not...
Blind Trust Walk• How does this activity relate to trust?• Which was easier, leading or following?• What is one thing you ...
Needed For This Exercise•Blindfolds•Safe Walking Route
Diversity Island          What do you think of when I say              Diversity?Materials Needed•Flip chart•Markers
Needed for this ExerciseTable signs•Pencils/paper•Playing cards•Rules Sheet
Barnga• Did your feelings or what you were  thinking change during play?• What were your frustrations?• What did you learn...
Leadershipft Retreat, BCS, Inc. Youth Uprising
Leadershipft Retreat, BCS, Inc. Youth Uprising
Leadershipft Retreat, BCS, Inc. Youth Uprising
Leadershipft Retreat, BCS, Inc. Youth Uprising
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Leadershipft Retreat, BCS, Inc. Youth Uprising

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Develop a sense of community among young men and women using and shifting existing leadership skills into usable tools to build, life, community and big citizenship. For more information about Leadershift call 206-850-3626 or reco@bembryconsulting.com.

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  • Description: This exercise allows the group to explore the change process and how we use our brain to process information & data. Definition: A Significant Life Event (SLE) impacts many people at the same time. A Significant Life Moment (SLM) is how you were personally impacted by that event. DVD References: Inspirational Movie Clips - Curtis Lee Story, Ali, Malcolm X, MLK Eye on the Prize, John Carlos – Olympics Facilitators: Facilitator stands in the front of the room and asks the following questions: Q: How do we re-program our brains to change? A: Through Words, Triggers, Emotions – Use an example. Facilitator: Repeat after me the word “spot”… · Say the word ten times…. Facilitator interrupts and states the following: · What happens when you come to a green light Comment: Participants will feel the first one was luck so providing the activity a second time will prepare most for the change environment. Facilitator: Repeat after me, “ 10, 10, 10, 10, 10, 10, 10.” · Say it ten times…. Facilitator interrupts and states the following: · What is an aluminum can made of? Facilitator answers: Aluminum. Then ask them to: · Identify what they were doing the day the planes hit the World Trade Center Twin Towers in New York. · Identify an event which impacted your life as dramatically as September 11th. Co-facilitators Break into small groups of 5 to discuss the following: · Talk about how one of the following SLE‟s impacted your entire group? Examples : Death of Michael Jackson, Trial of O.J. Simpson, Trial of Rodney King, Election of Barack Obama, Terrorist Attack of 911 .(Copyright Clear – Edge Learning Institute C/O NYC)
  • The Change Cycle™ Model Change has always been a necessary aspect of life and work, and our world is changing more rapidly than ever. It is likely that you will have to cope with a variety of changes in the near future. Your success and fulfillment - your emotional, mental, spiritual and physical well-being - depend on how well you adapt to change. People react, respond and adjust to change in a sequence of six predictable stages. The Change Cycle model identifies the thoughts, feelings and behaviors associated with each stage of change. There is no better map to assist you in navigating through the changes in your life. Stage 1 – Loss to Safety In Stage 1 you admit to yourself that regardless of whether or not you perceive the change to be good or 'bad" there will be a sense of loss of what "was." Stage 2 – Doubt to Reality In this stage, you doubt the facts, doubt your doubts and struggle to find information about the change that you believe is valid. Resentment, skepticism and blame cloud your thinking. Stage 3 – Discomfort to Motivation You will recognize Stage 3 by the discomfort it brings. The change and all it means has now become clear and starts to settle in. Frustration and lethargy rule until possibility takes over. The Danger Zone The Danger Zone represents the pivotal place where you make the choice either to move on to Stage 4 and discover the possibilities the change has presented or to choose fear and return to Stage 1. Stage 4 – Discovery to Perspective Stage 4 represents the "light at the end of the tunnel." Perspective, anticipation, and a willingness to make decisions give a new sense of control and hope. You are optimistic about a good outcome because you have choices. Stage 5 - Understanding In Stage 5, you understand the change and are more confident, think pragmatically, and your behavior is much more productive. Good thing. Stage 6 - Integration By this time, you have regained your ability and willingness to be flexible. You have insight into the ramifications, consequences and rewards of the change -- past, present, and future.  
  • Retreat Session # 2 Who AM I Description : Participants will use art supplies to create a poster which reflects who they are. They will create a Poster, Coat of Arms and Life Map as a result the activity which shows others who they are in their own words. This activity reveals the power of storytelling. · Participants will engage in self-reflection. · Participants will have an increased understanding of self. · Participants will have an increased understanding of how people perceive them. Directions: This activity will be done individually rather than as a group. Participants may use any of the art materials available for the session to create their Poster, Life Map and Coat Of Arms. Facilitators: Facilitator stands in the front of the room and asks the following questions: · How do people see you? · What is your perception of yourself? · How is your internal perception and their external perception aligned? Materials Needed: Poster boards, paper plates, boxes of crayons, feathers, beads, glue sticks, colored markers, magazines, sparkles. Note: ADLO – Play calming music with no lyrics: Jazz, classical or meditative. Create a calming relaxing environment. Examples : DVD Images of a cityscape; the East Bay, the US, the World on a loop with no sound. This loop is designed to create perspective and vision in the room. (See: DVD of Retreat Images) Facilitators: Youth Workers
  • Opportunity for youth to truly start ton engage in the process of sharing true feelings of who they are as opposed to what perception they want others considered to be enemies to see them as. This activity will engage youth in art therapy, journal writing and an introduction to the reflective practitioner methodology For more information key the following : donald schon (schön): learning, reflection and change Donald Schon made a remarkable contribution to our understanding of the theory and practice of learning. His innovative thinking around notions such as  ‘the learning society’, ‘double-loop learning’ and ‘reflection-in-action’ has become part of the language of education. We explore his work and some of the key themes that emerge. What assessment can we make now? 
  • This Series is available at Blockbuster Video – released September 2009 - was not available during the first retreat however will certainly provide an overview of the perceptions many youth have of themselves and of Oakland. This provides an opportunity for youth to start to separate themselves from perception through the process of the reflective turn… Note: To fully appreciate theory-in-use we require a model of the processes involved. To this end Argyris and Schon (1974) initially looked to three elements: Governing variables: those dimensions that people are trying to keep within acceptable limits. Any action is likely to impact upon a number of such variables – thus any situation can trigger a trade-off among governing variables. Action strategies: the moves and plans used by people to keep their governing values within the acceptable range. Consequences: what happens as a result of an action. These can be both intended - those actor believe will result - and unintended. In addition those consequences can be for the self, and/or for others. (Anderson 1997)
  • Retreat Session # 3 Reflection Description: This is a journal writing exercise designed to get participants in touch with where they are developmentally and how/why they want to change for the better. Directions: Participants reflect on their lives, write a letter to themselves discussing what they want to change and how they want to become leaders. Facilitators: Youth Workers Questions: 1. Who do you think you are? 2. Where you think you’re going? 3. How do you plan to get there? After the Activity: Staff collects letters addressed to participants‟ home address. Participants place a stamp on their letter and staff will mail them to participants. Post Activity Directions: Confirm that participants have provided an accurate address. Then tell them that when they receive their letter, they will determine whether they‟ve accomplished their goals for the retreat. It will also serve as a reminder of the activity and key learnings. Tips: Remind youth that no one will read the letter except them, this exercise is a reflective exercise designed to support their personal and professional development as well as an exercise in trust. Note: The notions of reflection-in-action , and reflection-on-action were central to Donald Schon’s efforts in this area. The former is sometimes described as ‘thinking on our feet’. It involves looking to our experiences, connecting with our feelings, and attending to our theories in use. It entails building new understandings to inform our actions in the situation that is unfolding.   The practitioner allows himself to experience surprise, puzzlement, or confusion in a situation which he finds uncertain or unique. He reflects on the phenomenon before him, and on the prior understandings which have been implicit in his behaviour. He carries out an experiment which serves to generate both a new understanding of the phenomenon and a change in the situation. (Schön 1983: 68)
  • Transformational Leadership and Followership Bass (1990) suggested the implementation of transformational leadership could change followers into leaders. Humphreys and Einstein (2004) contended that transformational leadership could motivate followers to be self-directing and increase follower performance. Changing followers to become self-motivated, self-directive and a leader from within is consistent with Kelley’s (1992) exemplary followership style. These examples from the literature fall short of explaining the perceptions these followers have of the change from the follower perspective, as the perspective is consistently from the leader’s point of view. Dvir, Eden, Avolio, and Shamir, (2002) longitudinal field study attempted to examine follower development as opposed to leader development in terms of followership, but the result of Dvir et al.’s study contended that transformational leadership improves a follower’s ability to think for themselves, thus continuing the theme that leadership makes the follower. However, exchanges of roles between leader and follower aid in the development of motivation and trust to form the LFX.
  • Retreat Session #4 Blind Trust Walk Description : An activity designed to discover very quickly your level of comfort leading or being led by someone you are unfamiliar with. Directions:  Divide the group in half and pair individuals up.  Instruct participants that once paired, one must be blindfolded. The other participant will serve as the guide as they walk around the area.  NO TALKING!!  The participants will have to safely navigate through a predetermined course and back to the beginning area.  Complete steps 2-4 with the first guide blindfolded and the first blindfolded individual as a guide. After the Activity: Regroup for discussion/debrief. Discussion Questions: 1. How does this activity relate to trust? 2. Which was easier, leading or following? 3. What is one thing you learned from this activity that you could apply to the rest of the LeaderSHIFT modules? 4. How does this activity relate to building an effective team? 5. How did communication (or lack of) affect trust? 6. What could have been done differently to make the activity easier? Things to Consider/Remember:  As is often the case with new groups, they are operating without a full understanding of how the group works. In essence they are operating “blindly.” Tips: You can use any blindfold available to you or purchase one with your organizational logo (recommended).
  • Relationships and Culture Building relationships while identifying with the leader of an organization and their vision is essential to good followership. Jehn and Bezrukova (2003) contended that followership is a people oriented behavior, and this behavior builds relationships between leaders and other followers, providing an environment that promotes all organizational members to focus on a common goal. Jehn and Bezrukova suggested that good followers may be a catalyst for change in an organization as followership “Inspires others to follow toward a common goal; creates enthusiasm and desire to excel; fully engages others; builds confidence; moves the organization ahead as one entity rather than separate parts” (p. 728). As relationships are important between leaders and followers, the quality of these relationships are equally important factors in developing an organizational culture of followers who maintain the characteristics that promote good followership. Werlin (2002) contended that good followership relationships must build on motivation rather than control, and that instilling values into followers is essential to developing a culture of trust and good relationships. The balance of power between leader and follower; however, must be maintained in order to provide a culture of openness that promotes self-engagement. A good relationship between followership to leadership requires that both leader and follower share elements of each (Schruijer & Vansina, 2002). Schruijer and Vansina contended that the characteristics of leaders and followers define the relationship that becomes followership and leadership. Wong (2003) contended that organizational cultures must involve and value all members of the organization, and that the characteristics of all members define the roles of leaders and followers. The identification and sharing of roles lead to LEFX.
  • Retreat Session #4(a) Diversity Diversity Island Description: An exercise designed to understand diversity and value difference by sensitizing participants to the ways in which we gather information about each other and the value, validity and use of that information. Directions: Show the pre-drawn island/water picture to the participants and ask: “What do you think of when I say diversity?” Allow for responses. Explain how Diversity Island works: Characteristics you can easily identify when you meet someone are put on the island (skin color, gender, etc.), characteristics you cannot are put below the water line (religion, sexual orientation, etc.), and characteristics that you can sometimes tell and sometimes not are put near the water line (class, race, education, etc.) Ask again, “What do you think of when I say diversity?” Have the person responding place their answers on the island. But make sure to question them as to the validity of that placement (for instance, most will try to place ethnicity on the island, but can this really be seen?) Continue until all thoughts are placed onto the drawing, as time permits. Then have participants draw their own island and place the answers to the responses on the flip chart. For example: “gender” is on the flipchart on the island. They would place their gender on their own drawn island. Discussion Questions: 1. What did you learn? A: They should realize that the majority of words are below the water. 2. What does that tell you? A: We don‟t really know someone when we first meet them. B: We have to learn about other aspects of them. 3. What does diversity really mean? 4. How does diversity relate to respect? Tips: Be sure to have them reflect on how little we know about people based upon what we see. It‟s what we can‟t see that may be most important about a person.
  • Retreat Session # 6 Barnga Directions: · Count off by number of tables. Place each player at the table that corresponds with their count off number. · Distribute rules for five minute review to each table. Each table MUST receive different rules! · No Speaking, no writing, no signing! You may draw pictures only! · Begin the tournament at home tables. · After 5 minutes, rotate winners. Have as many rounds as time permits. After the Activity: Regroup into regular seats. Discussion Questions: 1. Did your feelings or what you were thinking change during play? 2. What were your frustrations? 3. What did you learn playing this game today? 4. How does this game relate to trust, respect or integrity? Things to Consider: · Trust, respect and integrity require effective communication. · Communicating demands sensitivity and creativity. · Not all people communicate the same. · Understand and reconcile differences to function as an effective group. Tips: Your only job is to keep things moving – DO NOT help! Make sure the rules aren‟t being broken but let the participants resolve conflicts on their own.
  • Active Engagement Solovy (2005) stated, "Exemplary followers work beyond the expected to produce exemplary results" (p. 32). This statement provides an element of active engagement of exemplary followership, and a review of the literature (Dvir & Shamir, 2003; Johnson, 2003; Petrausch, 2002; Solovy, 2005) pertaining to followership and active engagement has yielded a connection between active engagement and followership. In a longitudinal study, Dvir and Shamir found that “collectivistic orientation, critical-independent approach, [to follower development] active engagement in the task, and self-efficacy, positively predicted transformational leadership among indirect followers” (p. 327). Theories by Kelley (1992), Barnard (1938), and Chaleff (2003) implied that good followers actively engage and think for themselves. This supports the relationship between active engagement and followership in a way that complements the theories. The systems that support follower active engagement remain diverse in the developmental process, leader influence, individual performer character, learning, and the follower understanding of their role in an organization are key factors in developing a good followership mentality that supports active engagement. To implement change in an organization, the exemplary follower must understand transformational change and the role the follower has in transformation.
  • Leadershipft Retreat, BCS, Inc. Youth Uprising

    1. 1. OpenPDF Manual Select AStart Point
    2. 2. Significant Life Moment / Significant Life Event• A Significant Life Event impacts many people at the same time• A Significant Life Moment is how you were personally impacted by that eventMaterials Needed•LCD Projector•Power Point Slides
    3. 3. How did you feel about these events?
    4. 4. Who AM I ?• How do people see you?• What is your perception of yourself?• How is your internal perception and their external perception aligned?Materials Needed•LCD Projector•Power Point Slides
    5. 5. Cue DVD – Gangland Oakland DVD Gangland Oakland
    6. 6. Reflection• Who do you think you are?• Where do you think you’re going?• How do you plan to get there?Materials Needed•Note pads,•pens, pencils, envelopes, stamps,•Jazz and Classical music no lyrics.
    7. 7. Blind Trust Walk• How does this activity relate to trust?• Which was easier, leading or following?• What is one thing you learned from this activity that you could apply to the rest of the LeaderSHIFT modules?• How does this activity relate to building an effective team?• How did communication (or lack of) affect trust?• What could have done differently to make the activity easier?
    8. 8. Needed For This Exercise•Blindfolds•Safe Walking Route
    9. 9. Diversity Island What do you think of when I say Diversity?Materials Needed•Flip chart•Markers
    10. 10. Needed for this ExerciseTable signs•Pencils/paper•Playing cards•Rules Sheet
    11. 11. Barnga• Did your feelings or what you were thinking change during play?• What were your frustrations?• What did you learn playing this game today?• How does this game relate to trust, respect or integrity?

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