OT Journey - OT Summary, Creation to the flood

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Study on Old Testament, Genesis from Adam to Enoch. Updated Aug 25th 2014 with objectives, lesson plan, activities.

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  • The Masoretic Text (MT) is regarded as the authoritative texts of the Old Testament. Most of our Bibles are based on these texts. These date back only to 7th to 11th centuries. During this time, the non-semitic “Masorites of Tiberias” created a school on the shores of the Sea of Galilee, and carefully standardised and preserved copies of the Old Testament.
  • The dead sea scrolls were discovered in caves near the ancient town of Qumran, 20 kilometres east of Jerusalem, between 1947 and 1956. They contain the oldest known Hebrew text of the Old Testament, written between 150 BC and 70 AD. More that 15,000 fragments and 500 manuscripts have been found from around 900 separate scrolls. They contain every book of the Old Testament with the exception of Esther, including 19 copies of Isaiah, 25 of Deuteronomy, and 30 of the Psalms.
  • The Septuagint (LXX) is the name for the Greek translation of the Old Testament. It was translated between the 3rd and 2nd centuries BC, and this is the version quoted by the New Testament and by early church fathers. It was used as the basis for Old Latin versions, Slavonic, Syriac, Old Armenian, Old Georgian and Coptictranslations. Remarkably there some early fragments of the LXX dating back to the second and third centuries BC, such as this one from the Rylands Library, containing parts of Deuteronomy 23-38:
  • Before the discovery of the Dead Sea scrolls, the oldest known Hebrew text was in the Nash Papyrus. It dates approximately 150-100 BC and was housed at Cambridge University. It contains the text of the Ten Commandments, fromExodus 20:2-17 and Deuteronomy 5:6-21
  • A geniza is a storeroom. Although many texts were thrown out, if a piece of writing contained the name of God, they were to be treated with respect, and even given a burial. Before they were buried, they were stored, meaning that we now have almost 300,000 fragments dating from 870 through to the late 1800′s.
  • Translated during the second century directly from the Hebrew into Syriac, a dialect of Aramaic.
    Peshitta means “simple” or “direct” translation.
    One example is manuscript 14,425 dating from the fifth century and contains Genesis, Exodus, Numbers and Deuteronomy. It is housed in the British Library, London. A complete manuscript is B. 21 inf housed in Milan, which dates from the sixth or seventh century, and a text held in Paris, Syr. 341, dates from the eighth century..
  • Finally, the Vulgate is a Latin translation of the Bible thanks to the labour ofJerome. Jerome translation came independently from the Hebrew, with the exception of Psalms. His translation was completed in 405 AD. The Codex Amiatinus is the earliest surviving nearly complete Vulgate Bible, dating from the start of the 8th century.
  • The First Council of Nicaea (/naɪˈsiːə/; Greek: Νίκαια [ˈni:kaɪja]) was a council of Christian bishops convened in Nicaea in Bithynia by the Roman Emperor Constantine I in AD 325. This first ecumenical council was the first effort to attain consensus in the church through an assembly representing all of Christendom.[5] It was presided over by Hosius of Corduba, a bishop from the West.

    Its main accomplishments were settlement of the Christological issue of the nature of the Son of God and his relationship to God the Father,[3] the construction of the first part of the Creed of Nicaea, establishing uniform observance of the date of Easter,[6] and promulgation of early canon law.[4][7] https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/First_Council_of_Nicaea
  • Ignatius of Antioch acknowledged about seven books (A.D. 115).
    Polycarp, a disciple of John the apostle, acknowledged 15 books (A.D. 108). Later, Irenaeus mentioned 21 books (A.D. 185). Hippolytus recognized 22 books (A.D. 170-235). The New Testament books receiving the most controversy were Hebrews, James, 2 Peter, 2 John, and 3 John.
    Canon of scripture by FF Bruce, Logos bible software It was actually not until 367 AD that the church father Athanasius first provided the complete listing of the 66 books belonging to the canon. (biblica.com)
    The first “canon” was the Muratorian Canon, which was compiled in AD 170. The Muratorian Canon included all of the New Testament books except Hebrews, James, and 3 John. In AD 363, the Council of Laodicea stated that only the Old Testament (along with one book of the Apocrypha) and 26 books of the New Testament (everything but Revelation) were canonical and to be read in the churches. The Council of Hippo (AD 393) and the Council of Carthage (AD 397) also affirmed the same 27 books as authoritative. Canon of scripture by FF Bruce, Logos bible software there was much less controversy over the canon of the Old Testament. Hebrew believers recognized God’s messengers and accepted their writings as inspired of God. While there was undeniably some debate in regards to the Old Testament canon, by A.D. 250 there was nearly universal agreement on the canon of Hebrew Scripture. The only issue that remained was the Apocrypha, with some debate and discussion continuing today. The vast majority of Hebrew scholars considered the Apocrypha to be good historical and religious documents, but not on the same level as the Hebrew Scriptures.Canon of scripture by FF Bruce, Logos bible software

    The Roman Catholic Church did not officially canonize the Apocrypha until the Council of Trent (1546 AD). This was in part because the Apocrypha contained material which supported certain Catholic doctrines, such as purgatory, praying for the dead, and the treasury of merit.
    Not one of them is in the Hebrew language, which was alone used by the inspired historians and poets of the Old Testament.
    Not one of the writers lays any claim to inspiration.
    These books were never acknowledged as sacred Scriptures by the Jewish Church, and therefore were never sanctioned by our Lord.
    They were not allowed a place among the sacred books, during the first four centuries of the Christian Church.
    They contain fabulous statements, and statements which contradict not only the canonical Scriptures, but themselves; as when, in the two Books of Maccabees, Antiochus Epiphanes is made to die three different deaths in as many different places.
    The Apocrypha inculcates doctrines at variance with the Bible, such as prayers for the dead and sinless perfection.
    And the day following Judas came with his company, to take away the bodies of them that were slain, and to bury them with their kinsmen, in the sepulchers of their fathers. And they found under the coats of the slain some of the donaries of the idols of Jamnia, which the law forbiddeth to the Jews: so that all plainly saw, that for this cause they were slain. Then they all blessed the just judgment of the Lord, who had discovered the things that were hidden. And so betaking themselves to prayers, they besought him, that the sin which had been committed might be forgotten. But the most valiant Judas exhorted the people to keep themselves from sin, forasmuch as they saw before their eyes what had happened, because of the sins of those that were slain. And making a gathering, he sent twelve thousand drachmas of silver to Jerusalem for sacrifice to be offered for the sins of the dead, thinking well and religiously concerning the resurrection, (For if he had not hoped that they that were slain should rise again, it would have seemed superfluous and vain to pray for the dead,) And because he considered that they who had fallen asleep with godliness, had great grace laid up for them. It is therefore a holy and wholesome thought to pray for the dead, that they may be loosed from sins. (2 Maccabees 12:39-46)
    The apocrypha contains offensive materials unbecoming of God's authorship.
    Ecclesiasticus 25:19 Any iniquity is insignificant compared to a wife's iniquity.
    Ecclesiasticus 25:24 From a woman sin had its beginning. Because of her we all die.
    Ecclesiasticus 22:3 It is a disgrace to be the father of an undisciplined, and the birth of a daughter is a loss.

    Pope Damasus (366-384) authorized Jerome to translate the Latin Vulgate. The Council of Carthage declared this translation as "the infallible and authentic Bible." Jerome was the first to describe the extra 7 Old Testament books as the "Apocrypha" (doubtful authenticity). Needless to say, Jerome's Latin Vulgate did not include the Apocrypha.

    http://www.bible.ca/catholic-apocrypha.htm

  • The History of Israel
    - A Chronological Presentation
    1. Early Times (1000 BCE - 135 CE)

    Ca. 1000 (BCE) - The Jewish Kingdoms
    King David ruled with Jerusalem as his capital over Judea, the first united kingdom in an area, which roughly corresponds to today's Israel including the West Bank. After the death of David's son, Solomon, in 931 BCE the kingdom was divided into a southern part, Judea, and Israel in the north.

    722 (BCE) - The Assyrians
    The Assyrians, a powerful people from northern Mesopotamia
    (today northern Iraq), invaded the northern Kingdom of Israel and deported the Jews to other parts of the Assyrian Empire. The Kingdom of Israel perished.

    586 (BCE) - The Babylonians
    After the fall of the Assyrian Empire the Babylonian king, Nebuchadnezzar II, conquered Jerusalem. The most influential Jews of Judea were deported to Babylon (in southern Mesopotamia, today Iraq). The first Jewish temple in Jerusalem was destroyed.


    The Kingdom of Solomon, the divided kingdom and Judea at the time of the Maccabees (the exact borders are subject to some uncertainty). The red line describes Israel's current borders incl. Gaza, the West Bank and the Golan Heights.

    538 (BCE) - The Persians
    King Cyrus of Persia (today Iran) conquered the entire Babylonian Empire, allowed the exiled Jews to return from Babylon, and accepted a form of Jewish home rule in Jerusalem. The Jewish temple was rebuilt.

    332 (BCE) - The Greeks
    The Greek-Macedonian ruler Alexander the Great destroyed the Persian Empire, thereby gaining control over Judea. After the death of Alexander his Hellenistic (Greek) Empire was divided into three parts, and the Jews got squeezed between the competing Greek rulers.

    164 (BCE) - The Maccabees
    A Jewish tribe, the "Maccabees", revolted against the Hellenistic occupiers, and from 142 BCE and the following 80 years Judea once again was an independent, Jewish state.

    63 (BCE) - The Roman Conquest
    The Romans invaded Greece and also conquered the Hellenistic Seleucid Empire in the Middle East. Though the Jews were granted some measure of autonomy in Jerusalem, Judea was in reality ruled from
  • The red line indicates israel today
  •  It is worth noting that these books were not accepted by the Roman Catholic church until 1546 in the Council of Trent. Therefore, for over 1300 years, since the inception of the Roman Church in the Fourth Century, even they did not consider them inspired of God. apocryphal meaning..bible.ca
  • Before the fall:
    Perfect rule: Ruler of earth, sea and all on it
    Perfect fellowship: Walked and talked with them
    Perfect environment – no sin, sickness, pain.
    Perfect enjoyment - everything but one fruit
    - the fruit of tree of knowledge of good and evil
    Perfect Access – Even tree of life was within reach
    Perfect Communication – Even talk to animals
  • God created people not puppets!
  • The word curse is used only for Satan and
    the ground. God’s pronouncements
    represent retaliatory justice.
    Adam and Eve sinned by eating;
    …they would suffer in order to eat.
    She manipulated her husband;
    …she would be mastered by her husband.
    The serpent destroyed the human race;
    …he will be destroyed.
  • Labour on unproductive land
    Be subject to Satan’s hurts and attacks
  • Your desire will be for your husband??
    A sustained and indefinable awareness that 'something is missing' in the relationship, [It is God alone who can supply what is now missing.]
    A primary focus of life on the desire to please the husband, which conflicts (sometimes terribly) with, or over-rides, the wife's personal desires, and which has replaced the order of creation [Read 1 Corinthians 7:34]
    Related to this, is a destructive desire for the husband's reputation and standing
    An almost magnetic attraction to the husband, to the extent that abused women repeatedly return to their abusive husbands. She is thwarted in fulfilling her desires because they are now under the rule and authority of her husband.
    Another side of the original term, that of a desire to overcome or defeat another eg. "[Sin's] desire is for you, but you should rule over it.“
    http://www.godswordforyou.com/bible-studies/marriage/85-study-four-curse-and-condemnation
  • Why did Adam and Eve eat the fruit of that one tree when they had a perfect life and everything he needed?
    Satan’s biggest trap – making them desire –
    what they did not need,
    what reduced their quality of life drastically
    What broke their fellowship with God
    What gave Satan control over the world
    What impacted those he loved as well
    What brought him a minute of pleasure in exchange for a lifetime of pain
    Every time we sin, we are repeating the same mistake Adam and Eve made
  • Pain and suffering are the consequences of man’s choice not God’s creation.
    In order to eliminate these he will have to eliminate mankind (as in Noah’s age)
    He is giving as many people opportunities to make the right choice and win a future without sin and suffering
  • Essentially a woman needs to love God over her man in order for her partnership, mission and potential to be realized.
    “4And Adam was not the one deceived; it was the woman who was deceived and became a sinner. 15But women will be saved through childbearing—if they continue in faith, love and holiness with propriety.” 1 Tim 2:14,15
  • He judged them
    He covered them
    He restored them (but not to their former position)
    He already planned for permanent restoration through Jesus (“he shall bruise his head”) refers to Jesus destroying Satan.
  • While Adam and Eve were agonizing over the one forbidden tree, right next to it was the tree of life – not forbidden. Are we battling over forbidden fruit when we can be experiencing God’s surprises?
  • Days where terrible heavenly creatures (cherubim were visible), protecting the perfect city

    There is every reason to assume that the garden of Eden was obliterated at the time of the Noachian deluge! In other words, it's quite likely that the cherubim (the Bible does not state how many were so assigned) were stationed at the entries of the garden of Eden.. How many times prior to the flood of Noah, did human travelers either accidentally stumble across one of the cherubim God had placed to guard the way to the garden of Eden? And what does a cherubim look like?" (Recall the biblical description in Ezekiel.)"

    Think about it. Adam and Methuselah were contemporaries. Men lived to a great age during the pre-flood period. For all of these hundreds of years, approximately ONE THOUSAND YEARS, these great creatures were stationed at the entrance to the garden of Eden, refusing entry to any humans who assayed to enter the garden!
    Now, think about the incredible collection of fables existant in many, many cultures around the earth!
    ... According to various tales, the castle is guarded by a dragon; but in any event, it is inhabited by a giant, who possesses a "goose that lays the golden egg."
    Dozens of varieties of this, and other mythological tales all portray similar scenes:
    1) That a fabulous, treasure-filled, idyllic castle, subterranean world, lost continent, or city is in existence somewhere.
    2) That such a castle or great-gilded city is guarded by a DRAGON. (Saint George and the dragon is but a derivative of this original myth.)
    3) The hero always encounters a huge, serpentine-appearing creature with wings, probably featuring FIRE coming out of his mouth!
    4) If the hero of the myth can somehow conquer the dragon, behold, the gates to the continent, city, or castle lay open before him, wherein are treasures unimaginable!

  • The time period from Adam to the Flood was 2256 years. The population at that time would have amounted to several billion people.
    The First-century historian Josephus, (Antiquities of the Jews, Chap. 2 vs. 3 footnote), says that Adam and Eve had 33 sons and 23 daughters, that is, c = 28. If this was a typical family size, the total world population before the Flood would have been totally beyond any reasonable numbers(World Population Since Creation by Lambert Dolphin)
    Adam and Methuselah were contemporaries
    Cherubim guarding garden of Eden – visible to all.

  • Ezekiel 1:4-11 shows us in great detail what cherubim look like:"4 And I looked, and, behold, a whirlwind came out of the north, a great cloud, and a fire infolding itself, and a brightness [was] about it, and out of the midst thereof as the colour of amber, out of the midst of the fire. 5 Also out of the midst thereof [came] the likeness of four living creatures. And this [was] their appearance; they had the likeness of a man. 6 And every one had four faces, and every one had four wings. 7 And their feet [were] straight feet; and the sole of their feet [was] like the sole of a calf's foot: and they sparkled like the colour of burnished brass. 8 And [they had] the hands of a man under their wings on their four sides; and they four had their faces and their wings. 9 Their wings [were] joined one to another; they turned not when they went; they went every one straight forward. 10 As for the likeness of their faces, they four had the face of a man, and the face of a lion, on the right side: and they four had the face of an ox on the left side; they four also had the face of an eagle. 11 Thus [were] their faces: and their wings [were] stretched upward; two [wings] of every one [were] joined one to another, and two covered their bodies. " (KJV)
  • (sons of God and daughters of men resulting in giants)
  • Enoch went on to walk with God another 300 years and was taken up ("translated") into heaven by God without dying. Methuselah survived to age 969, the oldest man who ever lived. True to prediction, the flood came the year Methuselah died.
  • ..Few other men and women among
    the billions who rebelled
  • What do we learn from Abel’s giving (Gen 4:2-16)? WINNING CONTRIBUTION
    Prime produce
    Pleasing to God
    What do we learn from Cain’s offering? WASTED CONTRIBUTION
    God disregarded it as Second best
    God gave him a second chance
    God warned him that sin was crouching and waiting to master him (Gen 4:5)
    Thot: Is our giving (time, talents, money) pleasing and acceptable to God or is it a waste of resources?
  • What do we learn from Abel’s giving (Gen 4:2-16)? WINNING CONTRIBUTION
    Prime produce
    Pleasing to God
    What do we learn from Cain’s offering? WASTED CONTRIBUTION
    God disregarded it as Second best
    God gave him a second chance
    God warned him that sin was crouching and waiting to master him (Gen 4:5)
    Thot: Is our giving (time, talents, money) pleasing and acceptable to God or is it a waste of resources?
  • Rest refers to removal of the curse of soil, which gave humankind rest. Noah was the 10th generation from Adam and a contemporary of Methuselah (who’s name meant “when he dies the flood will come”)
  • The above picture is a 1/32 scale model. This view shows the interior and the three decks God commanded Noah to make. The inside and outside was coated with pitch. A window was set 18 inches (one cubit) from the top (Genesis 6:16). Notice the size of the ark in comparison to the larger animals such as the hippopotamus! Also note the caging system used for the animals.

    How BIG was the inside? God stated its dimensions were to be 300 by 50 by 30 cubits. If we assume a cubit is roughly 18 inches (45.7 centimeters), the ark was 450 feet (137.2 meters) long, 75 feet (22.9 meters) wide and 45 feet (13.7 meters) high. The volume of the ship would be 1,518,000 cubic feet. The actual floor space would be more than 101,000 sq. feet (9,383 sq. meters)!

    Only air breathing, land based animals were taken on Noah's Ark (see Genesis 6:17,19-20, 7:22). Animals like whales, dolphins, alligators, fish, turtles, lobsters, etc. etc. didn't need saving from the flood since they already could live in water! That leaves roughly 40,000 or less animals, with the average size being that of a sheep, needing to be put on the ship. When fully loaded only 30% of the space was taken up by animals!
    www.biblestudy.org
  • He could have brought grains, wheat, dried fruits, vegetables, nuts and utilized milk and eggs of animals in ark as food for all in ark.

    Noah took additional clean animals (7 pairs) on board the ark. These were used for sacrifices.
    “built an altar to the Lord, and took of every clean animal and of every clean bird, and offered burnt offerings on the alter”
    It is also possible that they could have been used as food after exiting the ark as God then allows Noah and animals to have a non vegetarian diet.
  • Faith and obedience
  • Methuselah’s name was a warning – almost 1000 years before the flood
    Noah’s 100 plus years of ark construction was a prominent warning
    God’s clear communication to Noah on his intention to destroy the earth – a clear warning
    God warns us through our consciences and His word.

  • during the construction of the ark, in which a few, that is, eight persons, were brought safely through the water.21Corresponding to that, baptism now saves you-- not the removal of dirt from the flesh, but an appeal to God for a good conscience-- through the resurrection of Jesus Christ, 1 Peter 3
  • The world had reduced to one righteous man… in the final days, there will be few righteous men even in the church holding fast to the word of life..
    There will be few or no role models….only those who keep their eyes on Christ will be able to hold firm.
  • OT Journey - OT Summary, Creation to the flood

    1. 1. GOD’S TOUCHPOINTS Old Testament (OT) Journey Lesson 1: Old Testament Summary Old Testament Summary The Patriarchal Ages The Judges The Reign of Royalty The Prophetic Era
    2. 2. OT Walkthru – OT Summary
    3. 3. OT Summary – Presentation Overview • Objective • OT Book Summary • New Testament (NT) Book Summary • OT Timeline • The OT Rollercoaster • Bible Sources • OT Locations • Israel Today • Activity • Appendix – Lesson Plan
    4. 4. Objectives To understand: •The infallibility of the Scriptures •Their consistency through historical ages •The authenticity and timelessness of the sources
    5. 5. Introduction The bible is • Divinely inspired • Divinely compiled • With transforming power All Scripture is God-breathed and is useful for teaching, rebuking, correcting and training in righteousness, 2 Timothy 3:16
    6. 6. Christ’s Last Command 19 Go therefore and make disciples …20 teaching them to observe all that I commanded you; and lo, I am with you always, even to the end of the age.”
    7. 7. Great Diversity The bible is written by 40 authors: • In two major languages (& a minor) • With various occupations • In 3 continents • In 66 books (39 + 27) • Over a period of 1600 years • Yet converging at…..
    8. 8. Amazing Unity One theme : • There is one true God One purpose : • Redemption of mankind One Saviour : • Jesus Christ
    9. 9. OT Book Summary (39 books) • Genesis to DeuteronomyLaw • Joshua to EstherHistory • Job to Song of SolomonPoetry • Isaiah to DanielMajor Prophets • Hosea to MalachiMinor Prophets
    10. 10. NT Book Summary (27 books) • Matthew to JohnGospels • ActsHistory • Romans to PhilemonPaul’s Letters • Hebrews to JudePowerful Letters • RevelationProphecy
    11. 11. Timeline of Israel History One Kingdom Upto King Solomon Israel Captured by Assyria (722 BC) Judah Captured by Babylon(586 BC) Return to Israel
    12. 12. OT Rollercoaster Fall- Flood Noah Babel Abraham Egypt Moses Wilderness Joshua Idolatory Judges Call for King David Evil Kings Prophets Idolatory Jesus
    13. 13. OT Sources 1. Masoretic Text • Most Bibles based on these. • Date to 7th to 11th centuries AD. • “Masorites of Tiberias” created a school on the shores of the Sea of Galilee.
    14. 14. OT sources cont’d 2. Dead Sea Scrolls • Discovered in caves near Qumran, 20 km east of Jerusalem, between 1947 and 1956. • Oldest known Hebrew OT text, written between 150 BC and 70 AD. • More than 15,000 fragments and 500 manuscripts • 900 separate scrolls. • Contain every book of the Old Testament except Esther
    15. 15. OT Sources (Cont’d…) 3. The Septuagint (LXX) Greek translation of OT Between the 3rd and 2nd centuries BC Quoted in NT and by early church fathers. Basis for old Latin, Slavonic, Syriac, old Armenian, old Georgian and Coptic translations
    16. 16. OT Sources (Cont’d..) 4. Nash Papyrus • Dates approximately 150-100 BC • Was housed at Cambridge University. • Contains text of the Ten Commandments,
    17. 17. OT Sources (Cont’d…) 5. Cairo Geniza Fragments • Geniza or storeroom to keep writings on God before burial to treat them with respect. • We now have almost 300,000 fragments dating from 870 through to the late 1800′s.
    18. 18. OT Sources (Cont’d…) 6. Syriac Peshitta • Translated during the second century directly from the Hebrew into Syriac, a dialect of Aramaic. • Peshitta means “simple” or “direct” translation. • Housed in the British Library, London, Milan, Paris, etc. dating from 6th, 7th, 8th centuries.
    19. 19. OT Sources (Cont’d..) 7. Latin Vulgate Latin translation of the Bible by Jerome. Independent of the Hebrew, with the exception of Psalms. Completed in 405 AD. Dates from the start of the 8th century.
    20. 20. Establishing the Foundations The Council of Nicea led by Emperor Constantine put together the “Nicene Creed”, and foundations of the faith in 325 AD - represented by all Christendom.
    21. 21. Compiling the Canon In 367 AD Athanasius provided listing of the 66 books. Inputs/ endorsements also from: • Ignatius of Antioch (A.D. 115). • Polycarp, a disciple of John (A.D. 108). • Irenaeus (A.D. 185). • Hippolytus (A.D. 170-235). [1][2] • the Council of Laodicea (AD 363) • The Council of Hippo (AD 393) • Council of Carthage (AD 397) • Much less controversy over OT books, with exception of Apocrypha (Catholic inclusions in 1546 AD)
    22. 22. OT Locations – The Promised Land Abraham’s Journey
    23. 23. Some Important Locations in OT
    24. 24. OT Locations (Cont’d..)
    25. 25. Israel under Foreign Rule • n 931 BCE the kingdom was divided into a southern part, Judea, and Israel in the north. • 722 (BCE) - The Assyrians • 586 (BCE) - The Babylonians • 538 (BCE) - The Persians • 332 (BCE) - The Greeks • 164 (BCE) - The Maccabees (One sect of Jews) • 63 (BCE) - The Roman Conquest
    26. 26. Different Shapes of Israel 1000 BC – 100 BC
    27. 27. The Regathering of Israel – Last Three Centuries While Jews were scattered, persecuted, tortured killed in large numbers following Christ’s death • The waste desertland of Israel started becoming irrigated by returning Jews as prophesied • The nation which did not exist was reborn (1948) • Is the only Jehovah worshipping nation in the world • Is it coming together for Christ’s second coming?
    28. 28. Today
    29. 29. Discussion • What has been your biggest obstacle in reading the OT ? • Is OT only a book of history written by different people at different times ? If not, what are the other benefits of OT ? • How can you relate OT to NT ? • How can you relate OT to the present times ?
    30. 30. References 1. Canon of scripture by FF Bruce, 2. Logos bible software 3. biblica.com
    31. 31. GOD’S TOUCHPOINTS Old Testament (OT) Journey Lesson 2: Adam – A Fallen Faith Old Testament Summary The Patriarchal Ages The Judges The Royal Verses Prophets, Priests and Kings
    32. 32. OT Journey - The Patriarchal Ages • Adam – A Fallen Faith • From Fall to Flood • Noah – Surviving Faith • The World in Confusion – Babel • Job – Faith under Fire • Abraham – Soaring Faith • Isaac – Winging Faith • Jacob – Clinging Faith • Joseph – Unwavering Faith • God’s Direct Interventions in Genesis • God’s Special Interventions in Genesis • Moses – Humbled Faith • Israel – Leanness of Soul • God’s Commandments
    33. 33. Presentation Overview Adam – A Fallen Faith • Objective • A perfect world • Forbidden Fruit • The World with Satan • Pain and Suffering • Woman and the Fall • Satan’s Strategy • God’s Love • Discussion
    34. 34. Objectives To understand: • The consequences of the fall • Satan’s role and strategy • The problem of suffering • God’s hidden surprises
    35. 35. Adam and Eve – in a Perfect World Before the fall: • Perfect rule • Perfect fellowship • Perfect environment. • Perfect enjoyment • Perfect access • Perfect communication
    36. 36. Forbidden Fruit Why did God keep it in Adam’s reach? • Obedience is a choice • Following God is a choice • Following Satan is a choice
    37. 37. Curse, Punishment, or Justice? • God’s pronouncements represent retaliatory justice. • Curse was only for Satan and the ground.
    38. 38. God’s Justice To the serpant • Crawl on belly • Be crushed on head
    39. 39. God’s Justice To man • Labour • Attacked by Satan
    40. 40. God’s Justice • To woman • Bear children in pain • Desire her husband • Be ruled over by her husband
    41. 41. The World – in Satan’s Power Why did Adam and Eve mess their perfect life? Satan made them desire what: • They did not need • Reduced quality of life • Broke fellowship • Gave Satan control • Impacted his loved ones
    42. 42. Satan’s Strategy To make desire so powerful and titillating that it overpowers reason. To manipulate you into questioning God’s word To persuade you to divert blame instead of owning up 100% and repenting
    43. 43. Why Suffering?? The Lord is not slow to do what he has promised as some think. Instead He is patient with you, because He does not want anyone to be destroyed, but wants all to turn away from their sins.2 Pet 3:9
    44. 44. Woman’s Redemption How does woman get over the consequences of the fall? ..women will be saved through childbearing—if they continue in faith, love and holiness with propriety.” 1 Tim 2:15 Equal in status, different in role
    45. 45. God’s Love How did God respond to Adam’s sin? • He judged them • He covered them • He restored them • Planned restoration through Jesus
    46. 46. Discussion: Our Response • When is knowledge of evil best avoided? • How can we resist today’s forbidden fruit? • How do we lessen the impact of the fall?
    47. 47. What are we Reaching out to? Adam and Eve were agonizing over the forbidden tree, they missed the tree of life – just next to it! surprises?
    48. 48. References 1. http://www.jesusplusnothing.com/questions/gen3curse.h tm
    49. 49. GOD’S TOUCHPOINTS Old Testament (OT) Journey Lesson 3: Noah, Surviving Faith Old Testament Summary The Patriarchal Ages The Judges The Royal Verses Prophets, Priests and Kings
    50. 50. OT Journey - The Patriarchal Ages • Adam – A Fallen Faith • Noah – Surviving Faith • The World in Confusion – Babel • Job – Faith under Fire • Abraham – Soaring Faith • Isaac – Winging Faith • Jacob – Clinging Faith • Joseph – Unwavering Faith • God’s Direct Interventions in Genesis • God’s Special Interventions in Genesis • Moses – Humbled Faith • Israel – Leanness of Soul • God’s Commandments
    51. 51. Presentation Overview Noah – Surviving Faith – Presentation Overview• Objectives • The Times • First Prediction of Doom • A Few Good Men • Abel – Competent in Living and Giving • Enoch – Close Communion • Noah – Clean Character • Noah: • Held on to the word • Heeded God’s warning • Heart for worship • Inside the Ark • God’s covenant with Noah • Discussion
    52. 52. Objectives To understand: • The “days of Noah” vs. today • How to stand alone like the righteous few • God’s warning patterns • The magnitude of God’s provision • God’s covenant with Noah
    53. 53. The Darkness Deepens • Days of dragons, cherubims, giants and dinosaurs • Men lived long lives, toiling on cursed soil • Civilization had advanced significantly • Does this sound material of fairy tales? • Wickedness abounded. Genesis 6:5, 6
    54. 54. The Times • Population at the time of the flood would have amounted to several billion people. • Adam and Methuselah were contemporaries • Cherubim guarding garden of Eden
    55. 55. The Times • Ezekiel 1:5,6,10.. they had the likeness of a man. 6 And every one had four faces, and every one had four wings. • 10 As for the likeness of their faces, they four had the face of a man, and the face of a lion, on the right side: and they four had the face of an ox on the left side; they four also had the face of an eagle. (KJV)
    56. 56. The Darkness Deepens …… every imagination and intention of all human thinking was only evil all the time. 6:5 (Amplified)
    57. 57. The Times-Spiritual Climate In those days: •There was no bible •Few role models •Lessons handed down orally.
    58. 58. The First Prediction of Doom At age 65, Enoch became the father of Methuselah, whose name means "when he dies it (the flood) shall come."
    59. 59. A Few Good Men Few men stood apart including: • Abel – Competent in living and giving • Enoch – Close Communion • Noah – Clean Character
    60. 60. Abel – Competent in Living and Giving • Winning Contribution (Abel) - And the Lord had regard for Abel and for his offering v4 • Wasted Contribution (Cain) -For Cain and for his offering He had no regard v 5 (Gen 4:2-16)
    61. 61. Abel – Competent in Living and Giving Are we acceptable to God Is our giving (time, talents, money) pleasing and acceptable to God or is it a waste of resources?
    62. 62. Enoch – Close Communion Enoch: • Walked with God • Taken by God (Gen 5:21-25) • Pleased God (Hebrews 11) • Prophesied Christ’s coming with the saints (Jude 1)
    63. 63. Noah – Clean Character • Noah meant “rest” • Noah lived to see 10 generations including Abram’s birth • Patiently waited: • Decades while building the ark • Over a year in the ark • In the ark after earth around was dry – 8 weeks
    64. 64. God’s Specifications 14 So make yourself an ark of cypress wood; make rooms in it and coat it with pitch inside and out. 15 This is how you are to build it: The ark is to be three hundred cubits long, fifty cubits wide and thirty cubits high. 16 Make a roof for it, leaving below the roof an opening one cubit high all around. Put a door in the side of the ark and make lower, middle and upper decks. (Genesis 6:14-16)”
    65. 65. Inside the Ark It is estimated that around 8000 species of animals (possibly including young dinosaurs were in the ark) and occupied only half or one third the space.
    66. 66. Inside the Ark
    67. 67. What did the Inhabitants of Ark Eat?and Animals eat in Ark? • God instructed Noah to carry food into the ark2”You are to take every kind of food that is to be eaten and store it away as food for you and for them. “ Gen 6:21 • God was running the show and ensured everyone’s needs were provided.
    68. 68. Noah – Held on to the Word “Noah did everything just as God commanded him” Gen 6:22
    69. 69. Noah – Heeded God’s Warning This required: • Trust • Courage • Obedience • Willingness to stand alone
    70. 70. Noah – Heart for Worship • Noah’s first action on coming out of the ark was to build an altar to God • In response, God, via the rainbow, covenanted with Noah: • Never to destroy the world again • To remove the curse of the soil given to Adam
    71. 71. Recap • Abel – Competent in living and giving • Enoch – Close Communion • Noah – Clean Character • Held on to the word • Heeded God’s warning • Heart for worship • God’s covenant with Noah: • Curse of soil removed • God’s promise never to destroy world with flood. • God allows non veg food consumption.
    72. 72. Discussion: God’s Covenant with Noah 1. In what ways do you see similarity between those days and our current times? 2. What lessons do we learn from Enoch, Abel and Noah? 3. What warnings do we need to heed? 4. How are we, in a similar way to Noah’s ark, protected today? (1 Peter 3:20,21)
    73. 73. 'But as the days of Noah were, so shall also the coming of the Son of man be. For as in the days that were before the flood they were eating and drinking, marrying and giving in marriage, until the day that Noah entered into the ark, and knew not until the flood came, and took them all away; so shall also the coming of the Son of man be.'Matthew 24:37-39
    74. 74. References 1. http://www.arksearch.com/nabefore.htm 2. Search for Noah’s ark – Matthew Kneider

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