South Africa’s Skills Crisis Gill Connellan Chairperson
Are We Getting the Skills Development Deserve? <ul><li>17% of school leavers  achieved  the standard necessary to proceed ...
Are We Getting the Skills Development Deserve? <ul><li>Prognosis for the “matric” classes of 2010 and 2011 is not much bet...
Are We Getting the Skills Development Deserve? <ul><li>New single education system has not resolved the problem </li></ul>...
How Our School System is Contributing  to the National  Skills Crisis? <ul><li>We have not allowed enough time and have be...
How Our School System is Contributing  to the National  Skills Crisis? <ul><li>There are many challenges relating to mater...
State of Skills 2006 - 2007 <ul><li>Reviews the proposed interventions of the Joint Initiative </li></ul><ul><li>on Priori...
Purpose of the National  Scarce Skills List <ul><li>A set of indicators for  skills development interventions. </li></ul><...
State of Skills 2006 - 2007 <ul><li>11 major ‘families’ of occupation  experiencing shortages of skilled people -  </li></...
Important Observations on  the National Scarce Skills List <ul><li>Primarily the professions (including managerial positio...
Important Observations on  the National Scarce Skills List <ul><li>Imperative that we address the  </li></ul><ul><ul><li>s...
Important Observations on  the National Scarce Skills List <ul><li>The skills pipeline can usefully be analysed in terms o...
Unemployed graduates Source: The Minister of Education released these figures in a written answer to a question in   Parli...
Unemployed graduates <ul><li>A huge drop-out factor prevalent – </li></ul><ul><li>38% of university students </li></ul><ul...
Unemployed graduates <ul><li>The actual unemployment rate for this group has increased by half, </li></ul><ul><li>from 6.6...
State of Skills 2006 - 2007 <ul><li>Significant inefficiencies as South African learners move through higher education.  <...
Unemployed graduates <ul><li>Decline of work placements for University of Technology students </li></ul><ul><li>Without wo...
Unemployed graduates <ul><li>Even at some of our most advanced universities in South Africa, the yield in minimum time is ...
State of Skills 2006 - 2007 <ul><li>Dramatic decline in the number of new apprentices indentured since 1991 when the total...
  The ‘skills crisis’ can be  understood in three differing  ways:   <ul><li>A numeric shortage within a particular occupa...
Solutions Are Not Simple <ul><li>Maths and science scores amongst the lowest on the World Competitiveness Scale. </li></ul...
The New Developments in the skills landscape <ul><li>For the first time in South African educational and training history,...
The New Developments in the skills landscape <ul><li>The revolutionary nature of the new architecture involves the establi...
The New Developments in  the skills landscape <ul><li>The Position and Authority of the SETAs.  </li></ul><ul><li>Strength...
The New Developments in the skills landscape <ul><li>Accommodating Different Kinds of Learning </li></ul><ul><li>Revised n...
The New Developments in the skills landscape
The New Developments in the skills landscape
The New Developments in the skills landscape PROFESSIONALS perform analytical, conceptual and creative tasks through the a...
What we Propose <ul><li>3 occupational profiles </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Skills development administrator </li></ul></ul><ul>...
What we Propose 5 9 / 10 Master Strategist 5 8 / 9 Chartered 4 / 5 7 Practitioner Practitioner 3 / 4 5 / 6 Associate 3 / 4...
Final Considerations <ul><li>The skills crisis is over. The skills catastrophe has begun.  It stopped being a crisis when ...
<ul><li>Contact us at  </li></ul><ul><li>(021) 685 0451 </li></ul><ul><li>[email_address] </li></ul><ul><li>or </li></ul><...
Upcoming SlideShare
Loading in …5
×

south Africa's Scarce and Critical Skills

26,962 views

Published on

Published in: Education
0 Comments
0 Likes
Statistics
Notes
  • Be the first to comment

  • Be the first to like this

No Downloads
Views
Total views
26,962
On SlideShare
0
From Embeds
0
Number of Embeds
50
Actions
Shares
0
Downloads
212
Comments
0
Likes
0
Embeds 0
No embeds

No notes for slide
  • south Africa's Scarce and Critical Skills

    1. 1. South Africa’s Skills Crisis Gill Connellan Chairperson
    2. 2. Are We Getting the Skills Development Deserve? <ul><li>17% of school leavers achieved the standard necessary to proceed to university. </li></ul><ul><li>50% passed but did not qualify to proceed to university. </li></ul><ul><li>33% failed matric. </li></ul><ul><li>535 000 young people left school between the end of 2005 and 2007 with no “passing” certificate and into a very uncertain future. </li></ul><ul><li>The majority of these will join the ranks of the unemployed — young people between the ages of 20 and 24 comprise 14% of the labour force. </li></ul><ul><li>They are over-represented (27%) in the unemployed. </li></ul><ul><li>7,2 million illiterate people in South Africa. </li></ul>
    3. 3. Are We Getting the Skills Development Deserve? <ul><li>Prognosis for the “matric” classes of 2010 and 2011 is not much better. </li></ul><ul><li>Class of 2010 (Now Grade 10) – in 2001 (then Grade 3) </li></ul><ul><ul><li>30% did not have required standard of numeracy </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>54% did not have the required standard of literacy </li></ul></ul><ul><li>Class of 2011(Now Grade 9) – in 2005 (then Grade 6) </li></ul><ul><ul><li>72% did not have the required standard of numeracy </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>62% did not have the required standard of literacy </li></ul></ul>
    4. 4. Are We Getting the Skills Development Deserve? <ul><li>New single education system has not resolved the problem </li></ul><ul><ul><li>1 in 10 white children achieved an “A” aggregate </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>1 in 1000 black children achieved an “A” aggregate </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>66% of higher-grade maths passes – by 7% of the schools </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>0,6% of these are in historically African schools. </li></ul></ul><ul><li>Based on a national survey of performance by Dept. Education </li></ul>
    5. 5. How Our School System is Contributing to the National Skills Crisis? <ul><li>We have not allowed enough time and have been apathetic to gaining consensus to sustainable change in our education system. </li></ul><ul><li>We have tried to apply one size fits all teaching remedies to save time and energy, where differentiated teaching approaches are required. </li></ul><ul><li>Not enough differentiation between the needs of different schools and their states of readiness to implement change. </li></ul><ul><li>We have not paid nearly enough attention to sorting out our fundamental numeracy and literacy issues. </li></ul><ul><li>Our language of learning and teaching is seriously flawed. </li></ul>
    6. 6. How Our School System is Contributing to the National Skills Crisis? <ul><li>There are many challenges relating to material and other resources and not investment has gone into these issues. </li></ul><ul><li>Leadership and teaching staff have not been developed sufficiently, (especially at school and regional levels). </li></ul><ul><li>We have not identified appropriate social support mechanisms (although not for lack of trying). </li></ul><ul><li>The urban areas are lacking a community support base. </li></ul><ul><li>Planning has been poor (largely reactive). </li></ul>
    7. 7. State of Skills 2006 - 2007 <ul><li>Reviews the proposed interventions of the Joint Initiative </li></ul><ul><li>on Priority Skills Acquisition (JIPSA) in relation to three </li></ul><ul><li>priority fields: </li></ul><ul><li>Unemployed graduates </li></ul><ul><li>Engineers </li></ul><ul><li>Artisans </li></ul>Formal launch of the Joint Initiative in Priority Skills Acquisition (JIPSA) - 27 March 2006. A clear signal from government that skills development is now a number one priority in government’s effort to stimulate economic growth and reduce poverty and inequality.
    8. 8. Purpose of the National Scarce Skills List <ul><li>A set of indicators for skills development interventions. </li></ul><ul><li>A set of indicators for course development and career guidance that should be provided to learners and communities, including schools, FET, Colleges, Universities, Universities of Technology and learners across these institutions. </li></ul><ul><li>A basis for establishing the Work Permit Quota List and for evaluating employer-sponsored applications for work permits. </li></ul><ul><li>Begins to provide a platform for targeted interventions and mechanisms to monitor and evaluate both the success and impact of measures aimed at redressing particular scarcities. </li></ul>
    9. 9. State of Skills 2006 - 2007 <ul><li>11 major ‘families’ of occupation experiencing shortages of skilled people - </li></ul><ul><li>1. Engineering and built environment professions. </li></ul><ul><li>2. Health professions. </li></ul><ul><li>3. Finance professions. </li></ul><ul><li>4. Law professions. </li></ul><ul><li>5. City planners. </li></ul><ul><li>6. IT/ICT professions. </li></ul><ul><li>7. Natural science professions. </li></ul><ul><li>8. Management professions. </li></ul><ul><li>9. Education professions. </li></ul><ul><li>10. Transport professions. </li></ul><ul><li>11. Artisans. </li></ul>
    10. 10. Important Observations on the National Scarce Skills List <ul><li>Primarily the professions (including managerial positions) which are facing the largest magnitude of scarcity. </li></ul><ul><li>‘ Skills acquisition challenge is not a numbers challenge: it is a systems challenge’ - </li></ul><ul><li>JIPSA </li></ul><ul><li>A system malfunction characterised by bottlenecks and logjams which have slowed the production of the required amounts of skilled personnel needed in the skills pipeline from education and training into the labour market . </li></ul>
    11. 11. Important Observations on the National Scarce Skills List <ul><li>Imperative that we address the </li></ul><ul><ul><li>systems blockages and inefficiencies and the </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>quality problems that impede the acquisition of relevant, high quality skills to sustain growth over the medium to longer term. </li></ul></ul><ul><li>A major issue is the ageing, retirement or emigration of the skilled workforce, and the supply (and on-the-job mentoring) of younger artisans, technicians and engineers to replace them. </li></ul>
    12. 12. Important Observations on the National Scarce Skills List <ul><li>The skills pipeline can usefully be analysed in terms of: </li></ul><ul><li>The outputs of the school system </li></ul><ul><li>The training pathways from the school system into the public as well as the private further and higher education systems </li></ul><ul><li>Wastage, particularly with regard to throughput and attrition rates </li></ul><ul><li>Systems coordination and cooperation </li></ul><ul><li>Institutional capacity </li></ul><ul><li>Quality assurance </li></ul><ul><li>Measurement, monitoring and reporting (JIPSA, 2006e: 5). </li></ul>
    13. 13. Unemployed graduates Source: The Minister of Education released these figures in a written answer to a question in Parliament, September 2006. 20 9 71 37 798 Distance Education Total 10 32 58 43 484 Technikon Total 12 50 38 38 407 University total Not completed by 2004 % Graduated by 2004 % Dropped out by 2004 % First- time undergraduates in 2000 Universities
    14. 14. Unemployed graduates <ul><li>A huge drop-out factor prevalent – </li></ul><ul><li>38% of university students </li></ul><ul><li>58% of technikon students </li></ul><ul><li>71% distance education students </li></ul><ul><li>leaving these institutions in the period 2000-2004. </li></ul>
    15. 15. Unemployed graduates <ul><li>The actual unemployment rate for this group has increased by half, </li></ul><ul><li>from 6.6% to 9.7%, which represents the largest relative change for all </li></ul><ul><li>education groups. </li></ul><ul><li>A disturbing finding is the - </li></ul><ul><li>High levels of unemployment among graduates with certificates and diplomas in scarce skill areas such as business, commerce, management and the natural sciences. </li></ul><ul><li>Perceived poor quality of tuition at historically disadvantaged higher education institutions. </li></ul><ul><li>Poor labour market value of diploma and certificate courses obtained from FET Colleges, the former technikons and many private institutions offering these qualifications. </li></ul><ul><li>Absence of opportunities for work placement, and poor career guidance at school (DPRU, 2006: 19-20). </li></ul>
    16. 16. State of Skills 2006 - 2007 <ul><li>Significant inefficiencies as South African learners move through higher education. </li></ul><ul><li>Inadequate academic preparation </li></ul><ul><li>Financial difficulties </li></ul><ul><li>Lack of exposure to work experience </li></ul><ul><li>Receiving tuition in a language other than the home language </li></ul><ul><li>HIV and Aids </li></ul>
    17. 17. Unemployed graduates <ul><li>Decline of work placements for University of Technology students </li></ul><ul><li>Without work placements students are unable to graduate, although they may have passed all the theoretical requirements of the academic programme. </li></ul><ul><li>Industries are no longer interested in taking qualified students for work placement. </li></ul><ul><li>Industries rather take in unemployed or lower-skilled people on a learnership because of the payment they receive from the relevant SETA. </li></ul><ul><li>The fact that 5 300 of the 8 560 students are in the engineering sciences – a major scarce skill area - represents a serious wastage of human resources desperately required by the country’s growing economy. </li></ul>
    18. 18. Unemployed graduates <ul><li>Even at some of our most advanced universities in South Africa, the yield in minimum time is quite low <30% </li></ul><ul><li>Universities in India, Tanzania and Kenya - average yield in minimum time is closer to 90% and 95% of students graduate. </li></ul><ul><li>These students are subject to the same criteria of international accreditation as South African students. </li></ul><ul><li>These institutions also have less than a quarter of the resources going to South African institutions. </li></ul>
    19. 19. State of Skills 2006 - 2007 <ul><li>Dramatic decline in the number of new apprentices indentured since 1991 when the total number peaked at 10 758. </li></ul><ul><li>The total number of final year apprentices qualifying as artisans was at its highest in 1986 at 11 769 </li></ul><ul><li>Subsequently shrunk to 3 960 prior to the advent of the new government and its new training policies. </li></ul><ul><li>JIPSA’s proposal on artisans is to increase training output to 50 000 over the period 2007-2010 - translating into 12 500 artisans per annum, or an additional 7 500 new artisans each year. </li></ul>
    20. 20. The ‘skills crisis’ can be understood in three differing ways: <ul><li>A numeric shortage within a particular occupation or profession. </li></ul><ul><li>An ‘experience’ crisis rather than a ‘skills’ crisis. </li></ul><ul><li>Systemic bottleneck constraining the workings of the skills pipeline. </li></ul>
    21. 21. Solutions Are Not Simple <ul><li>Maths and science scores amongst the lowest on the World Competitiveness Scale. </li></ul><ul><li>The Growing Association of unemployed graduates is becoming increasingly unemployable. </li></ul><ul><li>What we have is the raw materials for the greatest system in the world. </li></ul><ul><li>Our national human resources strategy is the best in the world, along with all the elements of the strategy – NQF, SAQA etc. </li></ul>
    22. 22. The New Developments in the skills landscape <ul><li>For the first time in South African educational and training history, we now have a potential framework that has the possibility of creating intellectual parity across all knowledge & learning areas whether this happens in formal educational institutions, structured and/or unstructured workplace learning and other informal learning environments. </li></ul><ul><li>Prof. Merlyn Mehl – 3LAcademy </li></ul>
    23. 23. The New Developments in the skills landscape <ul><li>The revolutionary nature of the new architecture involves the establishment of a Quality Council for Trades and Occupations. </li></ul><ul><li>Situated within the Department of Labour </li></ul><ul><li>Operating across all 10 levels of the NQF </li></ul><ul><li>Working in synergy with the Department of Education through the Council on Higher Education (CHE) and Umalusi. </li></ul>
    24. 24. The New Developments in the skills landscape <ul><li>The Position and Authority of the SETAs. </li></ul><ul><li>Strengthening workplace training provision. </li></ul><ul><li>The legislative and policy framework. </li></ul><ul><li>Key considerations for 2nd economy for skills development. </li></ul><ul><li>Ongoing and sustainable funding mechanisms. </li></ul><ul><li>Cooperation between the various delivery agencies. </li></ul>
    25. 25. The New Developments in the skills landscape <ul><li>Accommodating Different Kinds of Learning </li></ul><ul><li>Revised national qualifications framework </li></ul><ul><li>Across different kinds of contexts </li></ul><ul><li>Challenges Facing the QCTO </li></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Philosophical </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Structural </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>The Design of the QCTO </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>The Organising Framework for Occupations </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>The Need for High Level Qualifications </li></ul></ul></ul>
    26. 26. The New Developments in the skills landscape
    27. 27. The New Developments in the skills landscape
    28. 28. The New Developments in the skills landscape PROFESSIONALS perform analytical, conceptual and creative tasks through the application of theoretical knowledge and experience in the fields of the arts, media, business, design, engineering, physical and life sciences, transport, education, health, information and communication technology, the law, social science and social welfare
    29. 29. What we Propose <ul><li>3 occupational profiles </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Skills development administrator </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Skills development practitioner </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Skills development strategist??? </li></ul></ul><ul><li>5 levels of professional registration </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Technician </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Associate </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Practitioner </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Chartered </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Master </li></ul></ul><ul><li>3 categories </li></ul><ul><ul><li>HRD/OD internal with core skills development </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>HRD/OD business consultant (skills development) </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Marginal skills development facilitator (non-core) </li></ul></ul>
    30. 30. What we Propose 5 9 / 10 Master Strategist 5 8 / 9 Chartered 4 / 5 7 Practitioner Practitioner 3 / 4 5 / 6 Associate 3 / 4 4 Technician Administrator OFO Skill level NQF level ASDFSA Professional body OFO
    31. 31. Final Considerations <ul><li>The skills crisis is over. The skills catastrophe has begun. It stopped being a crisis when we started arguing about whether we had a crisis. </li></ul><ul><li>We’re still talking about skills development and training: we’re not doing it. </li></ul><ul><li>The biggest challenges we face are overcoming our apathy. </li></ul><ul><li>We’re living and working in a global economy. </li></ul><ul><li>The danger exists that companies will again abrogate their own training responsibilities and leave it up to government to resurrect Indlela and other similar facilities, simply poaching the graduates. </li></ul>
    32. 32. <ul><li>Contact us at </li></ul><ul><li>(021) 685 0451 </li></ul><ul><li>[email_address] </li></ul><ul><li>or </li></ul><ul><li>[email_address] </li></ul>Questions?

    ×