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<ul><li>Autonomy, Dependency, and Attainment of Young Adulthood Tasks in Individuals with High Functioning Autism Spectrum...
Introduction <ul><li>High Functioning Autism Spectrum Conditions (HFASC) are neuro-developmental conditions characterized ...
Objectives  <ul><li>This study examined the developmental challenges individuals with HFASC face upon entering adult life ...
Method <ul><li>Sixteen young adults with HFASD and 24 typically developing (TD) controls  were matched on age, sex, and ed...
Results <ul><li>Participants with HFASC perceived themselves as less autonomous and as having poorer relationships with th...
<ul><li>Parents of young adults with HFASC described them as less autonomous and more dependent than controls’ parents.  <...
Results & Discussion <ul><li>Parents' evaluations of their young adult son/daughter's competence and dependency on them va...
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Autonomy, Dependency, and Attainment of Young Adulthood Tasks in Individuals with High Functioning Autism Spectrum Conditions

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Autonomy, Dependency, and Attainment of Young Adulthood Tasks in Individuals with High Functioning Autism Spectrum Conditions

  1. 1. <ul><li>Autonomy, Dependency, and Attainment of Young Adulthood Tasks in Individuals with High Functioning Autism Spectrum Conditions Abstract # 970010 </li></ul><ul><li>Alma Yannay-Shani & Ofer Golan Department of Psychology, Bar-Ilan University & The Association For Children at Risk </li></ul><ul><li>For further details: ofer.golan@biu.ac.il </li></ul>
  2. 2. Introduction <ul><li>High Functioning Autism Spectrum Conditions (HFASC) are neuro-developmental conditions characterized by social communication difficulties and restricted and repetitive behavior patterns, alongside intact cognitive and language abilities. </li></ul><ul><li>Young adulthood involves the manifestation of social skills and disengagement of the young adult from the practical and psychological dependency on his parents. </li></ul><ul><li>Young adults with HFASC experience difficulties meeting young adulthood developmental tasks. Upon their entrance to adulthood, they face a significant shortage of support systems, beyond that of the family. </li></ul>
  3. 3. Objectives <ul><li>This study examined the developmental challenges individuals with HFASC face upon entering adult life and their ways of coping with these challenges. </li></ul><ul><li>We explored perceived autonomy and dependency experienced by young adults with HFASC and evaluated by their parents. In particular, we explored: </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Quality of parent-young adult relationship (QPYAR) </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Young adult’s autonomy from parents (YAAP), </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>the young adults’ extent and quality of social relationships </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>The association of these relationships to the young adults’ attainment of adulthood’s developmental tasks, including the ability to sustain age-appropriate social relationships. </li></ul></ul>
  4. 4. Method <ul><li>Sixteen young adults with HFASD and 24 typically developing (TD) controls were matched on age, sex, and education. </li></ul><ul><li>Participants were interviewed on their experience of entering adulthood. </li></ul><ul><li>Interviews and questionnaires were scored on levels of autonomy, dependence, and relationships quality. </li></ul><ul><li>Participants' parents filled in a questionnaire evaluating their relationships with their son/daughter. </li></ul><ul><li>Participants with HFASC filled in a questionnaire assessing attainment of young-adulthood developmental tasks.  </li></ul>
  5. 5. Results <ul><li>Participants with HFASC perceived themselves as less autonomous and as having poorer relationships with their parents, compared to controls. </li></ul><ul><li>Relationships with mothers were particularly hampered. </li></ul><ul><li>Individuals with HFASC perceived themselves as having fewer social relationships and experiencing less closeness and support in them, compared to controls. </li></ul>Figure 1: QPYAR scores with both parents Table 1: Young Adult’ Scores on Relationships with Parents and Peers QPYAR -- Quality of parent young adult relationships ; YAAP -- Young adult's autonomy from parents ; SR – Social Relationships *p<0.05 **p<0.01
  6. 6. <ul><li>Parents of young adults with HFASC described them as less autonomous and more dependent than controls’ parents. </li></ul><ul><li>Mothers (but not fathers) perceived their son/daughter as more oppositional. </li></ul>Table 2: Parent’s reports on adult’s behavior & attitude Table 2: Parent’s reports on adult’s behavior & attitude
  7. 7. Results & Discussion <ul><li>Parents' evaluations of their young adult son/daughter's competence and dependency on them validated the young adult’s perspective. </li></ul><ul><li>The more parents evaluated their son/daughter as competent, the more he/she attained young adulthood developmental tasks. </li></ul><ul><li>Quality of relationships with father was negatively correlated to quality of relationships with mother. </li></ul><ul><li>These findings reflect complex dynamics in the HFASC group’s families, stressing the need for a systemic view of the challenges that individuals with HFASC face upon entering young adulthood, and for accessible social support systems for these young adults in the community. </li></ul>

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