Workshops on the web

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  • Elearning Revolution http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=dlJshzOv2cw
  • http://www.nytimes.com/2012/11/04/education/edlife/massive-open-online-courses-are-multiplying-at-a-rapid-pace.html Social Media wasn’t working Facebook discussions weren’t going anywhere Spending hours a week and maybe reaching a few people Just launched a book Let’s do a MOOC! Whether you call it Workshops on the web, distance learning courses, online courses, eLearning… It’s a GREAT TIME to be online.
  • http://www.nytimes.com/2012/11/04/education/edlife/massive-open-online-courses-are-multiplying-at-a-rapid-pace.html Social Media wasn’t working Facebook discussions weren’t going anywhere Spending hours a week and maybe reaching a few people Just launched a book Let’s do a MOOC! Whether you call it Workshops on the web, distance learning courses, online courses, eLearning… It’s a GREAT TIME to be online.
  • http://nces.ed.gov/pubs2012/2012154.pdf 2000 to 2008, increase of undergraduates enrolled in an online course went from 8% to 20% http://sloanconsortium.org/sites/default/files/pages/OnlineLearningSurvey-Infographic-1.png Info graphic Equivalent or better than face-to-face http://www.sr.ithaka.org/research-publications/interactive-learning-online-public-universities-evidence-randomized-trials Provides more flexiblity for the learner Customizable for the instructor (allows for variable teaching techniques, delivery methods… video, text, audio – multi-modal delivery) Comprehensive Learning is being quantified in unconventional ways “ Jail-breaking” the degree. (degreed.com) “ Badges for skills” openbadges.com Degree doesn’t carry the weight it once had… “Look at LinkedIn… people are endorsing your SKILL sets, not your knowledge”
  • 10 years ago, online learning would be in the form of a correspondence course. You would download a pdf version of a workbook or they would send you DVD and then you’d login online to take a test and ta-dah… you’d be done. Or you’d watch a webinar where your mic is muted and listen for an hour (while checking your email)… These may be effective ways of dissminating information – but this is not learning (it’s very passive and distilled). And it requires YOU to process through a lot of information that you may or may not need. Cardio Fitness course – primary focus of the workshop was to teach clients/students the variables you could manipulate in their cardio training – between tempo training, interval workouts, hill runs, etc. Along with teaching them the basics of heart rate training. It was a 6 week course and it was nothing complicated. But a huge component was delivered via podcast. And in this particular case, they were asked to complete their training on a treadmill because we had some flexibility in the variables… we could talk about intensity, heart rate… Wireless technology / Mobile learning has allowed learners to consume information on-the-go Equivalent or better than face-to-face http://www.sr.ithaka.org/research-publications/interactive-learning-online-public-universities-evidence-randomized-trials Ability to have flexiblity Customizable Comprehensive Not time-limited
  • Not just your resources… but think about where your time goes --- onboarding new trainers? Are you educating your trainers with new techniques or certifications? Do you already have an education segment that supplements and supports members? Don’t need to have technical know-how Can host your own courses on your own terms Can manage your own enrollment and registration Confound by academic limitations That’s not to say that there isn’t any strategy to be in order to differentiate or that saturation didn’t occur because anyone or everyone could enter this space But it was easy for anyone to create an online presence --- launch a business, set up a website, put up a Facebook page and start tweeting Things are FREE now… so leverage it!!
  • http://www.classesandcareers.com/collegelife/online_education_facts/ 4.6 million college students are taking at least 1 online course By 2014, this number will be 18.65 million http://www.coursehero.com/blog/2012/03/23/infographic-the-growth-of-distance-learning/ 27% distance learners are employed full time Not just students
  • Teaching in the academia is not easy in that the jobs are coveted. Knowing how to teach online is valuable. PROS: Easy marketing Free Training/Workshops CONS: Not a lot of money Look at the catalog and discover the courses they have. Ask for syllabus
  • Why should you – fitness professionals – put your workshops (courses, programs, etc.) on the web? We are trained to think Information is king. That if our clients just KNEW what was good for them, they would do it. So if we just taught a course on proper running technique – that they’d go out and do it. If we taught them the nutrition facts – that they’d eat healthy. But we know this isn’t necessarily true. So, when it comes to online courses/workshops --- don’t think of it as designing information. Think of it as designing an EXPERIENCE. Figure out What Purpose will it serve? What problem will it solve? Creating courses as a way to disseminate information – in today’s digital age where information can be found online via Google search – you have to find a REASON why your class deserves to be online. Why? Why should your course, program, training, workshop… exist online? What problem is it going to solve? I want my trainers to have enhanced knowledge in training the obese client. I want more people to enroll in my boot-camp I want our members to be better at understanding heart-rate based training.
  • Because it will help you set your objectives. I want my trainers to have enhanced knowledge in training the obese client. I want more people to enroll in my boot-camp I want our members to be better at understanding heart-rate based training. It’s not to say that education as a way to increase awareness on a topic isn’t good… it can be. But the more valuable courses tend to be the ones that teach skills that people can translate into their personal or professional lives.
  • 500 people signed up 85 were actively engaged 85 students passed the course We
  • 500 people signed up 85 were actively engaged 85 students passed the course We
  • This will help determine your revenue model. Fitness professionals --- continuing education CECs, charge Clients – subscription… free for clients, but paid for non-clients General Audience Global audience Think less about their tech-savviness and think more about their online expierence Is this their first online course or not? Also, each online course is different --- so, you need to establish the ground rules… expectations Build this into your course design… (how long to acclimate, where do they start, student orientation on how to use the platform, navigate the course, etc.) This may not be so obvious.
  • Adult Learning Theory Learner-Centered Constructivist Theory Active Learning eLearning Best Practices This will help you in the design of the course and help you build the interactive pieces. The constructivist view of learning emphasizes active involvement of learners in constructing knowledge for themselves: The learner actively constructs knowledge, through achieving understanding Learning depends on what we already know, or what we can already do Learning is self-regulated Learning is goal-oriented Learning is cumulative In the research literature we see an increasing focus on the design of student-centred methods and environments: research on problem-based, project-based, enquiry-oriented pedagogies producing constructivist tasks and environments, placing emphasis on reflection and feedback. The following methods have been extensively researched: • Problem-based learning • Anchored instruction • Cognitive apprenticeships • Reciprocal teaching • Goal-based scenarios • Project-based learning This will be helpful when you are putting a team together for your courses and help in the design of the course. And if you do social media – 6/11 per week people spend on their social media http://www.nwlink.com/~Donclark/hrd/costs.html Development time Varying hours MOOC on Elearning and Digital cultures… and it’s free!
  • Adult Learning Theory Learner-Centered Constructivist Theory Active Learning eLearning Best Practices This will help you in the design of the course and help you build the interactive pieces. The constructivist view of learning emphasizes active involvement of learners in constructing knowledge for themselves: The learner actively constructs knowledge, through achieving understanding Learning depends on what we already know, or what we can already do Learning is self-regulated Learning is goal-oriented Learning is cumulative In the research literature we see an increasing focus on the design of student-centred methods and environments: research on problem-based, project-based, enquiry-oriented pedagogies producing constructivist tasks and environments, placing emphasis on reflection and feedback. The following methods have been extensively researched: • Problem-based learning • Anchored instruction • Cognitive apprenticeships • Reciprocal teaching • Goal-based scenarios • Project-based learning This will be helpful when you are putting a team together for your courses and help in the design of the course. And if you do social media – 6/11 per week people spend on their social media http://www.nwlink.com/~Donclark/hrd/costs.html Development time Varying hours MOOC on Elearning and Digital cultures… and it’s free!
  • Remember – these are not correspondence courses… you can’t just put material online and call it an online course. http://www.nwlink.com/~Donclark/hrd/costs.html Development time Varying hours MOOC on Elearning and Digital cultures… and it’s free! Pelz ‘s final principle is to ―strive for presence.‖ According to Pelz, there are three forms of presence for which to strive in online learning environments: Social Presence, Cognitive Presence, or Teaching Presence. These ideas are described in detail in Pelz‘s report:10  Social Presence : When participants in an online course help establish a community of learning by projecting their personal characteristics into the discussion — they present themselves as ―real people.‖ There are at least three forms of social presence: o Affective . The expression of emotion, feelings, and mood. o Interactive . Evidence of reading, attending, understanding, thinking about others ‘ responses. o Cohesive . Responses that build and sustain a sense of ‗belongingness, ‘ group commitment, or common goals and objectives  Cognitive Presence : The extent to which the professor and the students are able to construct and confirm meaning through sustained discourse (discussion) in a community of inquiry. o Cognitive presence can be demonstrated by introducing factual, conceptual, and theoretical knowledge into the discussion. o The value of such a response will depend upon the source, clarity, accuracy and comprehensiveness of the knowledge.  Teaching Presence : Teaching presence is the facilitation and direction of cognitive and social process for the realization of personally meaningful and educationally worthwhile learning outcomes. There are two ways that the professor and the students can add teaching presence to a discussion, as displayed in the following table. http://www.uwec.edu/AcadAff/resources/edtech/upload/Best-Practices-in-Online-Teaching-Strategies-Membership.pdf
  • Working with an Instructional Designer Instructional designers bring a focus on learning theory to the course development process. One key contribution is tying all course content and activities back to learning objectives and outcomes. Faculty are deep in the course content and have valuable classroom experience to inform the online course development. IDs bring the experience in learning theory and online methodologies. Faculty and instructional designer should develop a shared vision for the content/course -- this includes providing faculty with examples of how the content will be presented online. For subject areas in which the instructional designer has limited exposure or expertise, faculty may want to spend some time at the outset educating them on the course content. Prepare learning objectives and content overview before engaging with the instructional designer. This will guide the overall course development.
  • Not just your resources… but think about where your time goes --- onboarding new trainers? Are you educating your trainers with new techniques or certifications? Do you already have an education segment that supplements and supports members? Blog posts Articles YouTube videos Webinars (archived) Facebook groups What do you wish people knew how to do? Determine a course that emphasizes skills sets – measurable objectives Design a course that emphasizes experience instead of information. For instance: Heart Rate Training… Course of the gym… Teach them how to read their heart rate and know where to go for what… How to read the resources on…
  • Blended courses tend to have a higher completion rate, lower attrition 4-6-8 weeks tend to be a good average (any more than that is too short or too long)
  • Blended courses tend to have a higher completion rate, lower attrition 4-6-8 weeks tend to be a good average (any more than that is too short or too long)
  • Blended courses tend to have a higher completion rate, lower attrition 4-6-8 weeks tend to be a good average (any more than that is too short or too long)
  • Blended courses tend to have a higher completion rate, lower attrition 4-6-8 weeks tend to be a good average (any more than that is too short or too long)
  • $0-hundreds of dollars Planning CECs (back-end costs for you)
  • Not just your resources… but think about where your time goes --- onboarding new trainers? Are you educating your trainers with new techniques or certifications? Do you already have an education segment that supplements and supports members? Blog posts Articles YouTube videos Webinars (archived) Facebook groups What do you wish people knew how to do? Determine a course that emphasizes skills sets – measurable objectives Design a course that emphasizes experience instead of information. For instance: Heart Rate Training… Course of the gym… Teach them how to read their heart rate and know where to go for what… How to read the resources on…
  • Educational technology
  • Workshops on the web

    1. 1. 427: Workshops on the Web PRESENTED BY Biray Alsac-Seitz, M.S.© 2013 IDEA Health & Fitness Association. All Rights Reserved. www.ideafit.com
    2. 2. Leverage Education • IFJ July-August 2012 “30 Ways to Make More Money: Win the Leverage Lotto” • Develop online training programs • Deliver educational workshops online • Host certification courses online • Start a ‘small-group’ training program online • Repurpose content online© 2013 IDEA Health & Fitness Association. All RightsReserved.
    3. 3. This is the time to go online… eFitnessLearning Revolution© 2013 IDEA Health & Fitness Association. All RightsReserved.
    4. 4. This is the time to go online… “The Year of the MOOC” NY Times 11/12/2012© 2013 IDEA Health & Fitness Association. All RightsReserved.
    5. 5. CULTURE • Accepted form of learning • Learning is comparable (or better) than face-to-face workshops or courses • Trend towards non-traditional learning (“Jail-breaking” the degree) “From 2000 to 2008, the increase of undergraduates enrolled in an online course went from 8% to 20%© 2013 IDEA Health & Fitness Association. All RightsReserved.
    6. 6. TECHNOLOGY • Wireless and mobile technologies is making learning more flexible • Customized learning experience • Consistent learning experience© 2013 IDEA Health & Fitness Association. All RightsReserved.
    7. 7. LOW BARRIERS TO ENTRY “Online courses are to education today as social media was to marketing 8 years ago.” • Easy-to-Use web-based tools (i.e., Learning Management Systems - LMS) • Many free (low cost) course authoring tools • No need to have too much technical know-how • Integrates easily with current marketing (social media)© 2013 IDEA Health & Fitness Association. All RightsReserved.
    8. 8. MARKET • Increasing number of people who participate in distance learning • Targets market reaches a range of professionals and life learners “By 2014, 18.65 million people will take (at least) one online course.”© 2013 IDEA Health & Fitness Association. All RightsReserved.
    9. 9. AUDIENCE • Academic • Professional Development • Corporate • Non-Profit© 2013 IDEA Health & Fitness Association. All RightsReserved.
    10. 10. COST-EFFECTIVE • Digital materials • Sustainable / Re-usable design • Low delivery costs (no classroom, rentals, travel)© 2013 IDEA Health & Fitness Association. All RightsReserved.
    11. 11. COST-PROHIBITIVE • Time-intensive development • Technology costs • Development costs© 2013 IDEA Health & Fitness Association. All RightsReserved.
    12. 12. Workshops on the Web What purpose What problem will it serve? will it solve?© 2013 IDEA Health & Fitness Association. All RightsReserved.
    13. 13. 1. Set Your Goals • “I want my trainers to know how to effectively train a variety of clients.” “Trainers should be able to apply specific training techniques that motivate the obese client.” • “I want more people to come to my boot-camp class.” “I want clients to be able to modify the exercises to meet their fitness level.”© 2013 IDEA Health & Fitness Association. All RightsReserved.
    14. 14. 1. Set Your Goals • GOALS: Determine course learning objectives (LO) • COURSE LOs: Determine which learning objects are used (content, practice, assessment items) • ASSESSMENT: Tie-back (measure) learning objectives© 2013 IDEA Health & Fitness Association. All RightsReserved.
    15. 15. 1. Set Your Goals • GOALS: Increase knowledge of interval training • COURSE LOs: • Define interval training • Identify the different types of interval training • ASSESSMENT: Quiz© 2013 IDEA Health & Fitness Association. All RightsReserved.
    16. 16. 2. Consider Your Audience • Who will attend your course? (FitPros? Clients? General Public? Global?) • What’s their previous online experience?© 2013 IDEA Health & Fitness Association. All RightsReserved.
    17. 17. 3. Determine Your Time Commitment • Research time • Learning Theories (Adult Learning, Active Learning) • eLearning Best Practices • Take online courses (observe / evaluate)© 2013 IDEA Health & Fitness Association. All RightsReserved.
    18. 18. 3. Determine Your Time Commitment • Development time • Ranges from course to course • Dependent on complexity of learning objects • Approximately 90 – 132 hours to develop per hour of training (low interactivity to high interactivity) (just estimates)© 2013 IDEA Health & Fitness Association. All RightsReserved.
    19. 19. 3. Determine Your Time Commitment • Delivery time (live) • Weekly / 24/7 • Synchronous vs. Asynchronous • Your classroom presence • Social presence • Cognitive presence • Teaching presence© 2013 IDEA Health & Fitness Association. All RightsReserved.
    20. 20. 4. Get an Instructional Team Together • Education Coordinator (contact person) • Instructional Designer/Technologist (ADDIE) • Subject Matter Expert (You, another Trainer) • Primary Instructor • Assistant Instructor (TA) • Facilitator / Moderator© 2013 IDEA Health & Fitness Association. All RightsReserved.
    21. 21. 5. Evaluate Your Resources • What is your area of expertise? • What content already exists? • What activities are you good at? • What can you re-purpose?© 2013 IDEA Health & Fitness Association. All RightsReserved.
    22. 22. 6. Delivery Parameters • 100% online vs. blended + + +© 2013 IDEA Health & Fitness Association. All RightsReserved.
    23. 23. 6. Delivery Parameters • Duration • 4-week class? • 10-week class? • 6-weeks + 2 on-site days?© 2013 IDEA Health & Fitness Association. All RightsReserved.
    24. 24. 6. Delivery Parameters • Frequency • Are you offering it once? • Every 4 weeks? • Twice a year?© 2013 IDEA Health & Fitness Association. All RightsReserved.
    25. 25. 6. Delivery Parameters • Enrollment size • Exclusive - 25 people • Inclusive - 25,000 people© 2013 IDEA Health & Fitness Association. All RightsReserved.
    26. 26. 7. Determine Cost • Free • Indirect revenue (from textbooks, products) • Potential revenue (from future clients) • Paid • Direct revenue© 2013 IDEA Health & Fitness Association. All RightsReserved.
    27. 27. 8. Set Marketing / Enrollment Strategy • Social Media (used to get people into your class) • Align with universities and other online courses • Set up registration process • Who else has access to an audience of learners?© 2013 IDEA Health & Fitness Association. All RightsReserved.
    28. 28. 9. Begin Creating the Course (ADDIE) • Assess • Develop • Design • Implement • Evaluate Sound familiar?© 2013 IDEA Health & Fitness Association. All RightsReserved.
    29. 29. 10. Choose Your Technology • Hosting • Web-based (domain name, server space) • Platform – Learning Management System (LMS) • Instructional • Technology to create/support educational efforts, both in the classroom and eLearning. • 3 types of interaction • Learner-content • Learner-instructor • Learner-learner© 2013 IDEA Health & Fitness Association. All RightsReserved.
    30. 30. Google Me Biray Alsac-Seitz, MS BeFitWithBiray@gmail.com @befitt LinkedIn© 2013 IDEA Health & Fitness Association. All RightsReserved.

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