Saying no to native apps - UX Masterclass Copenhagen

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  • How many people have completed or in the process of working on mobile apps?\nHow many people built those apps specifically for iphone or android?\nHow many people built them as web apps?\nWho’s not sure what the difference is?\n
  • They’re everywhere, on everything\n
  • Peter-Paul Koch is a mobile platform strategist, consultant, and trainer in Amsterdam, the Netherlands.\n
  • An app who’s sole purpose is to make a single calculation. These guys just wanted to have something in the app store.\n
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  • It’s an imperative\n
  • It’s an imperative\n
  • It was a blackberry phone\n
  • It’s great if you only care about your customers with iPhones, but, then you have to do it all over again, from scratch, for each platform\nBuild (in different languages), test, maintain – all independently – you’re quadrupling your efforts and costs.\n\nEvernote was making different argument -- but they develop for 5 native platforms!!!\n\n
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  • This is more local, and based on people actually using the web on their phones\n
  • The context of this quote is he was defending the need to go native\n
  • Need to get programming language for Blackberry, Windows...\n
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  • Basically what they know is if they download it in the the app store\n
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  • http://www.quora.com/Why-choose-HTML5-over-native-code-for-a-mobile-app?q=native+app\n
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  • Instagram is a massive hit. But it’s a project that’s conceived of as an app. They have a one-page website. This has nothing to do with your business.\n\nThey have no customers, so they start with one platform. This makes sense for them. You or your clients probably have a lot of customers already -- this approach makes much less sense. It’s not that you’re cutting off potential customers -- you’re cutting off actual customers.\n
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  • http://www.quora.com/What-are-the-best-hybrid-mobile-apps-html5-embedded-in-native-app-for-added-functionality\n\nThis basically eliminates the distinction between native and mobile web app\n
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  • Hold on a second, what about all this talk about this talk about responsive web design?\n
  • Book is from 2010 -- entirely focused on iphone apps. He puts this point in brackets.\n\n“For the foreseeable future, I believe the best way forward is a common-denominator mobile website—with graceful degradation so that a majority of mobile users are served—paired with one or three audience-appropriate native apps.”\n
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  • Saying no to native apps - UX Masterclass Copenhagen

    1. 1. Saying No to Native AppsBrian DonohueUX Masterclass, Copenhagen, April 2011
    2. 2. iPhone appsare ubiquitous
    3. 3. iPhone appsare ubiquitous
    4. 4. Execs just want an iPhone apphttp://url.ie/a1wt
    5. 5. But they’re often “vanity apps”
    6. 6. But mobile is not a vanity thing
    7. 7. For the biggest players, it’s the focus
    8. 8. “Throwaway” user test questionMe: “So have you ever tried to(almost embarrassed asking it) access utility client’s website on your phone?”Participant:(tradesman, not computer savvy)
    9. 9. “Throwaway” user test questionMe: “So have you ever tried to(almost embarrassed asking it) access utility client’s website on your phone?”Participant: “I was sitting on my couch(tradesman, not computer savvy) watching TV. My computer was down in the hallway. I couldn’t be arsed getting off the couch. So, I tried to see if I could get my bill on my phone.” (He couldn’t.)
    10. 10. What execs don’t understand: fragmentation
    11. 11. Going native is a policy of exclusion...
    12. 12. Going native is a policy of exclusion...
    13. 13. http://url.ie/a1xc
    14. 14. supports 5 native mobile platforms
    15. 15. supports 5 native mobile platforms“We could probably save 70% of ourdevelopment budget by switching to a single,cross-platform client Phil Lebin, CEO http://url.ie/a1xl
    16. 16. Defining “native” vs. “mobile web” Objective C HTML, CSS, JS works best on webkit browsers Java C ++
    17. 17. Different platforms usually meansdifferent people Java Objective C
    18. 18. But what’s the difference to customers?
    19. 19. and do I access it here...
    20. 20. Native isn’t always better Native app only Both Web app only  Gyroscope and  Store data offline  Much easier to test, Accelerometer  Access GPS prototype, and rollout  Accessing filesystems  Have app-like UI and  Can update (e.g. address book, transitions immediately (no app photos) store approval),  Accessible as app  Fully-immersive customers don’t have from home screen experience (e.g. to update the app gaming)  Can link to the app  ??Findability?? (e.g. SMS with link to  Support in-app purchases your bill) (Apple takes 30% cut)  HTML 5 is continually  Camera adding hardware capabilities  Smoother and more responsive
    21. 21. Are there any UX benefits to mobileweb app?
    22. 22. Are there any UX benefits to mobileweb app?
    23. 23. Do you have a 1-page website too?
    24. 24. If mobile is a complement to yourwebsite, it’s very likely the mobile approute makes more sense
    25. 25. Hybrid is an almost magical solution
    26. 26. Who’s going with HTML 5?
    27. 27. Who’s going with HTML 5?
    28. 28. Who’s going with HTML 5?
    29. 29. But what about this “responsive webdesign” stuff?
    30. 30. Be wary -- this stuff changes fast 2010: “(Website owners interested in developing an iPhone app might start by developing an iPhone- targeted website, where most of this book’s design principles also apply.)”
    31. 31. Be wary -- this stuff changes fast 2010: “(Website owners interested in developing an iPhone app might start by developing an iPhone- targeted website, where most of this book’s design principles also apply.)” 2011: “Platforms are risky places to put your business...If you can do it with the Web -- do it with the Web. It’s faster, cheaper, and easier.” Web app masters tour, 2011: http://www.lukew.com/ff/entry.asp?1281
    32. 32. The takeaway:start by saying no to native
    33. 33. The takeaway: start by saying no to nativeIt’s not that native apps are the wrongapproach. But your starting point foryour mobile strategy should be a webapp. Force yourself to justify the nativedecision. Stand up to your CEO.

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