I. Origins and intent of Copyright II. Congress and Copyright extensions, the DMCA III. A Response: the Creative Commons L...
I. Origin of Copyright "The Congress shall have Power ...  To promote the Progress of Science and useful Arts,  by se...
I. Origin of Copyright The Intent of Copyright Protection   <ul><ul><li>is  to promote the progress of science and the use...
I. Origin of Copyright What are the “Rights” in Copyright?   <ul><li>Copyright gives authors the following exclusive, inta...
I. Origin of Copyright What are the “Rights” in Copyright?   <ul><li>Additional, related author's rights include: </li></u...
I. Origin of Copyright <ul><li>Copyright protects all of the following: </li></ul><ul><ul><li>An author's original work.  ...
II. Congress and Copyright extensions, the DMCA During 1998, the 105th congress passed two bills to amend the 1976 Copyrig...
II. Congress and Copyright extensions, the DMCA Eldred V. Ashcroft
III. A Response: the Creative Commons Licenses The Licensing Project This project enables users to build and attach machin...
III. A Response: the Creative Commons Licenses
III. A Response: the Creative Commons Licenses
What, me worry? (about the commons of creativity and innovation) IV. Protecting the commons of Creativity & Innovation
 
IV. Protecting the commons of Creativity and Innovation <ul><li>USPTO changes, the courts as arbiters, power to litigate <...
V. Acknowledgements and Resources <ul><li>Brenda Laurel and Rob Tow </li></ul><ul><li>Lawrence Lessig </li></ul><ul><li>Jo...
V. Acknowledgements and Resources <ul><li>This presentation is at:  www.digitalspace.com/presentations/artcenter/ </li></u...
VI. Discussion
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Bruce Damer's presentation on the Creative Comons at Art Center College of Design (Jan 2003)

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Bruce Damer's presentation on the Creative Comons at Art Center College of Design (Jan 2003)

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Bruce Damer's presentation on the Creative Comons at Art Center College of Design (Jan 2003)

  1. 1. I. Origins and intent of Copyright II. Congress and Copyright extensions, the DMCA III. A Response: the Creative Commons License IV. Protecting the commons of Creativity and Innovation V. Acknowledgements and Resources VI. Discussion The Creative Commons License, the Intercommons and a general discussion of Intellectual Property A presentation for: Art Center College of Design (1/23/2003) The Digital Space Commons Presents
  2. 2. I. Origin of Copyright &quot;The Congress shall have Power ... To promote the Progress of Science and useful Arts, by securing for limited Times to Authors and Inventors the exclusive Right to their respective Writings and Discoveries.&quot;
  3. 3. I. Origin of Copyright The Intent of Copyright Protection <ul><ul><li>is to promote the progress of science and the useful arts, </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>so authors get a mini-monopoly as one inducement to develop new work, </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>but copyright is limited when it appears to conflict with the overriding public interest of encouraging further development; </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>is not to promote the author's own interests or increase the author's own wealth. </li></ul></ul>
  4. 4. I. Origin of Copyright What are the “Rights” in Copyright? <ul><li>Copyright gives authors the following exclusive, intangible rights: </li></ul><ul><ul><li>reproduction right: the right to make copies of protected work; </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>distribution right: the right to sell or otherwise distribute copies to the public; </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>derivative right: the right to create new works (derivative works or adaptations) based on the protected work; </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>performance and display rights: the right to perform a protected work, such as a stageplay, or to display a protected work, such as a film, in public (where the specific rights depend on the medium). </li></ul></ul><ul><li>Copyrights are a collection of property rights : they belong to their owner and may be sold or otherwise exploited for economic benefit.s </li></ul>
  5. 5. I. Origin of Copyright What are the “Rights” in Copyright? <ul><li>Additional, related author's rights include: </li></ul><ul><li>rights of attribution: authors have the right to have their names associated with their work, and </li></ul><ul><li>rights of integrity: authors have the right to not have their names associated with unflattering modifications to their work. </li></ul>
  6. 6. I. Origin of Copyright <ul><li>Copyright protects all of the following: </li></ul><ul><ul><li>An author's original work. </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Legitimate derivative works. </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Material an author legally adds to already-copyrighted work. </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>The selection, coordination, and arrangement of a compilation. </li></ul></ul><ul><li>What is copyright infringement? </li></ul><ul><li>Copyright infringement (aka copyright piracy) occurs when a person other than the copyright owner exploits one or more of the copyright owner's exclusive rights without the owner's permission. Such use is theft . </li></ul><ul><li>Copyright law does not prevent infringement from occurring. It does offer remedies for situations in which infringement does occur: the owner can obtain damages, penalties, and reimbursements. </li></ul>What does Copyright Protect, what is Infringement?
  7. 7. II. Congress and Copyright extensions, the DMCA During 1998, the 105th congress passed two bills to amend the 1976 Copyright Act: the Sonny Bono Copyright Term Extension Act and the Digital Millenium Copyright Act (DMCA). Lawrence Lessig: “The Mickey Mouse Protection Act”
  8. 8. II. Congress and Copyright extensions, the DMCA Eldred V. Ashcroft
  9. 9. III. A Response: the Creative Commons Licenses The Licensing Project This project enables users to build and attach machine-readable licenses that dedicate at least some of the rights within a &quot;copyright&quot; to the public. LAUNCHED:December, 2002 Founders' Copyright This project enables contributors to dedicate their work to the public domain after a copyright term of just 14 years – the same term as the initial term established by the First Congress of the United States in 1790. LAUNCHED: December, 2002
  10. 10. III. A Response: the Creative Commons Licenses
  11. 11. III. A Response: the Creative Commons Licenses
  12. 12. What, me worry? (about the commons of creativity and innovation) IV. Protecting the commons of Creativity & Innovation
  13. 14. IV. Protecting the commons of Creativity and Innovation <ul><li>USPTO changes, the courts as arbiters, power to litigate </li></ul><ul><li>Impact of “dot com bomb” and VC-Venture Speculation </li></ul><ul><li>Effects of open source </li></ul><ul><li>Attempts and risks in creating Conservancies </li></ul><ul><li>Standards wars, survival of standards? </li></ul><ul><li>Slowing of pace of innovation </li></ul><ul><li>Innovation necessary for survival </li></ul><ul><li>The Intercommons and other commons initiatives </li></ul>
  14. 15. V. Acknowledgements and Resources <ul><li>Brenda Laurel and Rob Tow </li></ul><ul><li>Lawrence Lessig </li></ul><ul><li>Jordan Pollack </li></ul><ul><li>Jan Hauser </li></ul><ul><li>Creative Commons </li></ul><ul><li>Intercommons community </li></ul>
  15. 16. V. Acknowledgements and Resources <ul><li>This presentation is at: www.digitalspace.com/presentations/artcenter/ </li></ul><ul><li>www. creativecommons .org Creative Commons </li></ul><ul><li>The Intercommons: www.intercommons.com </li></ul><ul><li>www.digitalspace.com The Digital Space Commons </li></ul><ul><li>www.calpoly.edu/~cschefti/Talks/IPRW/outline.html origin and definition of Copyright </li></ul><ul><li>Lawrence Lessig homepage & blogs: cyberlaw . stanford . edu / lessig / </li></ul><ul><li>Contact: damer @ digitalspace .com , 831.338.9400 </li></ul>
  16. 17. VI. Discussion

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